“This is a very interesting study that suggests that receptors on our tongue that allow us to sense bitter flavours are also linked to our vulnerability to respiratory infections like COVID-19,” says David Aronoff, director of the division of infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University Medical Centre, in Nashville, Tennessee, who was not involved with this research.Variations in the structure of the T2R38 protein the gene encodes correlates with a person’s tolerance of bitter compounds—such as phenylthiocarbamide and propylthiouracil—which are abundant in many vegetables, including broccoli, cabbage, and brussels sprouts.Supertasters have a higher likelihood of having polyps in their colon, a risk factor for cancer associated with lower intake of those bitter vegetables.These “extraoral” areas include the epithelial cells that line the nose and upper respiratory tract, where they respond to invading pathogens.A 2012 study led by Noam Cohen, a rhinologist at the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, found that bacteria responsible for sinus infections activate the T2R38 protein receptors on cells lining the respiratory tract, causing them to produce nitric oxide.The numbers of “taste receptors decrease with age, which potentially explains why the elderly population seems to do worse than their younger counterparts,” Barham says.The relatively small number of adults examined were in a fairly narrow age range, so it’s not known whether the correlation between taste preferences and COVID-19 severity exists in children or the elderly.Barham’s findings suggest that taste-testing could provide a safe, fast, and inexpensive way to categorise people into risk groups for COVID-19 and other infections. .

Could a distaste for broccoli indicate greater resistance to COVID-19?

It sounds a little hard to swallow, but a new study suggests that how people react to bitter flavors correlates with the severity of their COVID-19 infection.If this association holds true, it implies, for example, that people who don’t find broccoli too bitter are in a higher risk group for severe COVID-19.“This is a very interesting study that suggests that receptors on our tongue that allow us to sense bitter flavors are also linked to our vulnerability to respiratory infections like COVID-19,” says David Aronoff, director of the division of infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, in Nashville, Tennessee, who was not involved with this research.Variations in the structure of the T2R38 protein the gene encodes correlates with a person’s tolerance of bitter compounds—such as phenylthiocarbamide and propylthiouracil—which are abundant in many vegetables, including broccoli, cabbage, and brussels sprouts.Supertasters have a higher likelihood of having polyps in their colon, a risk factor for cancer associated with lower intake of those bitter vegetables.These “extraoral” areas include the epithelial cells that line the nose and upper respiratory tract, where they respond to invading pathogens.A 2012 study led by Noam Cohen, a rhinologist at the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, found that bacteria responsible for sinus infections activate the T2R38 protein receptors on cells lining the respiratory tract, causing them to produce nitric oxide.The numbers of “taste receptors decrease with age, which potentially explains why the elderly population seems to do worse than their younger counterparts,” Barham says.The relatively small number of adults examined were in a fairly narrow age range, so it’s not known whether the correlation between taste preferences and COVID-19 severity exists in children or the elderly.Barham’s findings suggest that taste-testing could provide a safe, fast, and inexpensive way to categorize people into risk groups for COVID-19 and other infections. .

Aversion to Broccoli May Have Genetic Roots

If you have heart disease, your doctor might tell you, eat more vegetables.Jennifer L. Smith is a nurse researcher at the University of Kentucky who now has a preliminary answer about why change is so hard: it might depend on your genes.“So broccoli is definitely one of them.If these findings hold up to more testing, Smith says, perhaps doctors could advise patients with this gene variant to avoid the most offensively bitter veggies but to try the others.

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Broccoli Beats Ulcers, Cancer

May 28, 2002 -- If new research holds true, the current President Bush and his famous father may want to rethink their shared distaste for broccoli. .

George H. W. Bush broccoli comments

George H. W. Bush, the 41st president of the United States, mentioned his distaste for broccoli a number of times.When asked if he'd lost the "broccoli vote" because of his comments,[1] Bush made the following casual remark about the vegetable outside the White House in an exchange with reporters:[3].I do not like broccoli.And I'm President of the United States.She eats it all the time herself.George S. Dunlop, President of the United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association, gave First Lady Barbara Bush a bouquet of broccoli and an additional ten tons of the vegetable in trucks.[10][11] Many parents, who were trying to get their children to eat vegetables, were enraged at the president's comments.Therefore, you can make people buy broccoli.44th President of the United States Barack Obama announced in 2013 that his favorite food was broccoli at an anti-obesity event for children.

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Broccoli, Hated By a President, Is Capturing Popular Votes

Unwilling to join the Bush camp and fresh from a plate of broccoli with garlic sauce, Mr. Blount said this new couplet captured his from-the-heart feelings:.Since the new research findings emerged, the wholesale price of broccoli has doubled, said Howard Glickberg, an owner of the Fairway market on the Upper West Side.Steven Provost, a spokesman for Kentucky Fried Chicken in Louisville, Ky., said his company was considering broccoli, with 30 or so other ingredients, as a side dish."I hate to sound like Pat Buchanan," he said, "but the elite in New York and Washington who think meat should be a condiment are simply out of touch.". .

Supertaster: What They Are and How To Know If You're One

But some people are far more sensitive to taste than others.The number of FPs and the number of taste buds on each FP vary by person.The study authors didn’t find a link between supertasting PROP and the number of FPs a person had, suggesting that genetics or other factors lead to supertasting.Another study found that supertasters who were sensitive to the taste of fats may be more likely to have more FPs.Pros and cons of being a supertaster Being a supertaster isn’t bad — it’s just the way you experience the world.Eating fewer vegetables could mean you’re not getting enough fiber.Does supertasting lead to picky eating in children?While there are many reasons for this, one possibility is that kids start life with a whole bunch of FPs but have fewer as they age.Compared with 30-year-olds, people over age 70 have up to 70 percent fewer cells in their bodies.What does changing taste mean for supertasters?Convincing young supertasters to eat veggies Here are some inventive ways for superparents to get supertaster children to eat their veggies without them even realizing it (but this takes time and patience): Smoothies are a great way to combine vegetables with fruit and yogurt to make a tasty and nutritious meal. .

Coronavirus: Your distaste for bitter flavours may make you less

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Stalking a Broccoli-Basher : Counteroffensive: Growers and

Ventura County’s broccoli growers and politicians proclaimed their love of the vegetable Thursday after President Bush said he has hated broccoli ever since he was a boy and will never eat it again.On the other hand, a lot of Ventura County schoolchildren made it clear that they agree with the President completely and hate broccoli just as much as he did when his mother forced him to eat it as a child.“That brought a lot of publicity to the parade, and this will help focus attention on the fact that we grow broccoli here.”.“Probably the President just doesn’t know how to fix it,” Flynn said, adding that his family prefers broccoli steamed and crisp.Growers in the northern reaches of Lagomarsino’s district in Santa Maria took the President’s comments more seriously.In addition to O’Connell, the President got lots of sympathy from Ventura County’s school population.In elementary schools in Oxnard, Simi Valley, Moorpark, Thousand Oaks, Ventura and Camarillo where broccoli is cultivated on surrounding farms, the vegetable has been missing--but not missed--from the lunch menu because it is left uneaten, school officials said.At Poinsettia Elementary School during the lunch hour Thursday, faces broke out in disgust at the mention of having to eat “that green stuff” or “little trees” at meals at school and home.Some students admitted to feeding their pets broccoli after being ordered to clean their plates.It was a different story at one Ralphs supermarket where shoppers have not slacked in their love for the vegetable just because of Bush’s dislike for broccoli, said Paul Hagstrom, produce manager.Shopper Maryanne Gomez, 31, of Oxnard criticized Bush’s dislike for the vegetable as she loaded four large bundles of broccoli into a basket full of groceries for her family.Gomez said that her two children love the vegetable and that she would continue to feed them ample servings.“Broccoli’s good for you.He should set a good example for the kids.”.I do not eat much broccoli.But it’s a bum rap that I don’t like any vegetables.Ventura County district attorney.Anything I don’t like I feed to the horse.”.Ventura County supervisor.“Maybe the President doesn’t know how to fix it. .

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