Also known as foodborne illness, it can cause a range of symptoms, most commonly stomach cramps, diarrhea, vomiting, nausea and loss of appetite.This is mainly due to two types of bacteria, Campylobacter and Salmonella, which are commonly found in the guts and feathers of these birds.These bacteria often contaminate fresh poultry meat during the slaughtering process, and they can survive up until cooking kills them ( 1 , 2 ).The good news is that although these harmful bacteria can live on raw poultry, they’re completely eliminated when meat is cooked thoroughly.In fact, fruits and vegetables have caused a number food poisoning outbreaks, particularly lettuce, spinach, cabbage, celery and tomatoes ( 10 ).Vegetables and leafy greens can become contaminated with harmful bacteria, such as E. coli, Salmonella and Listeria.Contamination can occur from unclean water and dirty runoff, which can leach into the soil that fruits and vegetables are grown in ( 11 ).Summary Vegetables and leafy greens can often carry harmful bacteria such as E.

coli, Salmonella and Listeria.However, shellfish caught from unmonitored areas may be unsafe due to contamination from sewage, stormwater drains and septic tanks.Summary Fish and shellfish are a common source of food poisoning due to the presence of histamine and toxins.Uncooked rice can be contaminated with spores of Bacillus cereus, a bacterium that produces toxins that cause food poisoning.If cooked rice is left standing at room temperature, these spores grow into bacteria that thrive and multiply in the warm, moist environment.They can become contaminated with harmful bacteria including Listeria and Staphylococcus aureus at several stages during processing and manufacturing.The reported rates of Listeria in sliced beef, turkey, chicken, ham and paté range from 0–6% ( 22 , 23 , 24 , 25 ).It is important to note that all meat carries a risk of food poisoning if it is not cooked or stored properly.Summary Deli meats including ham, salami and hot dogs can be contaminated with bacteria that cause food poisoning.Unpasteurized Dairy Pasteurization is the process of heating a liquid or food to kill harmful microorganisms.Food manufacturers pasteurize dairy products including milk and cheese to make them safe to consume.Pasteurization kills harmful bacteria and parasites such as Brucella, Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, E. coli, Listeria and Salmonella.Summary Pasteurization involves heating foods and liquids to kill harmful microorganisms such as bacteria.The good news is that since 1990, improvements have been made in egg processing and production, which has led to fewer Salmonella outbreaks ( 33 ).Fruits grown on the ground such as cantaloupe (rockmelon), watermelon and honeydew melon have a high risk of causing food poisoning due to Listeria bacteria, which can grow on the rind and spread to the flesh ( 35 ).Summary Fruits carry a high risk of food poisoning, particularly melon and berries.In 2014, beansprouts contaminated with Salmonella bacteria caused food poisoning in 115 people, a quarter of whom were hospitalized ( 40 ).Fortunately, cooking sprouts helps kill any harmful microorganisms and reduces the risk of food poisoning.Summary Sprouts grow in moist, warm conditions and are an ideal environment for the growth of bacteria.Avoid washing raw meat and poultry: This does not kill the bacteria — it only spreads it to other foods, cooking utensils and kitchen surfaces.Practice good hygiene, check use-by dates, wash fruits and vegetables before eating them and keep food out of the temperature danger zone of 40–140°F (5–60°C).

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Food Poisoning or Stomach Bug? How to Tell the Difference

Taste of Home Marinated Oranges This flavorful fruit was actually the topping in a cake recipe.—Aysha Schurman, Ammon, Idaho Go to Recipe Baby carrots go over big when seasoned with the subtle taste of rosemary.My family and I enjoy it so much that it’s a staple on our southern front porch.—Melissa Pelkey Hass, Waleska, Georgia Go to Recipe Fresh sprigs of lemon thyme make this citrusy tea so refreshing—it’s like sipping summer from a cup.—Anthony Graham, Ottawa, lllinois Go to Recipe When I was sick, my mom would make me this heartwarming chicken noodle soup.—Becky Walch, Orland, California Go to Recipe Don’t be afraid to bring out the roasted Brussels sprouts.—Christina Addison, Blanchester, Ohio Go to Recipe To get my son to eat veggies, I mix and match flavors and spices.It gets its delicious flavor from toasted fennel seeds—a pleasant complement to the carrots, apple and sweet potato.It gets its delicious flavor from toasted fennel seeds—a pleasant complement to the carrots, apple and sweet potato.—Aysha Shurman, Ammon, Idaho Go to Recipe When I have some leftover veggies, I dress the salsa up a little with some diced green onions and bell peppers.Pumpkin & Cauliflower Garlic Mash I wanted healthy alternatives to my family's favorite recipes.—Jan Valdez, Lombard, Illinois Go to Recipe The key to this savory chicken is the combination of garlic, fresh rosemary and thyme.—Deirdre Cox, Kansas City, Missouri Go to Recipe Cutting the carrots lengthwise makes this dish look extra pretty.Taste of Home Herb Roasted Root Vegetables Here's a simple-to-fix side that is perfect for a festive dinner.—Deirdre Cox, Kansas City, Missouri Go to Recipe Here's a simple-to-fix side that is perfect for a festive dinner.—Chris Dalton, Mundelein, Illinois Go to Recipe I came up with this soup one weekend when my wife and I were hungry for something better than the standard.—Katelyn Kelly, Perryville, Maryland Go to Recipe Inspired by the spicy chai drinks served at coffee shops, I whipped up a caramel-drizzled latte I can enjoy at home anytime.—Joy Zacharia, Clearwater, Florida Go to Recipe Zingy vinaigrette combines orange juice, ginger and a flick of cayenne.—Joanna Sargent, Sandy, Utah Go to Recipe A good friend made us this rich, comforting, creamy chicken noodle soup after the birth of our son.—Norma Reynolds, Overland Park, Kansas Go to Recipe This satisfying soup with a hint of cayenne is brimming with vegetables, chicken and noodles.This creamy chicken and wild rice soup has been part of our Christmas Eve menu for years.To save time, I cook the chicken and wild rice and cut up the vegetables the day before.This creamy chicken and wild rice soup has been part of our Christmas Eve menu for years.To save time, I cook the chicken and wild rice and cut up the vegetables the day before.Ambrosia Salad Because it’s so simple to make, this tropical fruit medley is great as a last-minute menu addition.—Judi Bringegar, Liberty, North Carolina Go to Recipe Because it’s so simple to make, this tropical fruit medley is great as a last-minute menu addition.Pumpkin Bisque with Smoked Gouda I love the smell of this rich, cheesy soup as it bubbles on the stove.The Gouda cheese adds a delightful smokiness that just says autumn to me.—Kerry Dingwall, Ponte Vedra, Florida Go to Recipe I love the smell of this rich, cheesy soup as it bubbles on the stove.The Gouda cheese adds a delightful smokiness that just says autumn to me.—Kerry Dingwall, Ponte Vedra, Florida.Taste of Home Carrot Chowder My husband's grandmother passed this recipe on to us, and it's just wonderful—especially with a basket of warm, fresh bread on the side.Taste of Home Curly Noodle Chicken Soup I created this recipe to serve at a dinner I hosted for a group of friends.Ideal for entertaining, the recipe can be assembled in advance and popped in the oven when guests arrive.—Joanna Johnson, Flower Mound, Texas Go to Recipe Roasted garlic lends a rich flavor to this appetizing chicken entree, and it complements the spinach nicely.Ideal for entertaining, the recipe can be assembled in advance and popped in the oven when guests arrive.The creamy, nicely seasoned broth is chock-full of tender chicken, potatoes, carrots and celery.—Julee Wallberg, Salt Lake City, Utah Go to Recipe When the weather turns chilly, I stock my soup pot with this warmer-upper.The creamy, nicely seasoned broth is chock-full of tender chicken, potatoes, carrots and celery.Taste of Home Chive Buttered Carrots It's nice to have a reliable side dish like this that pairs well with any entree.—Opan Snell, Jamestown, Ohio Go to Recipe It's nice to have a reliable side dish like this that pairs well with any entree.Best Ever Chicken Fajita Chowder Warm up weeknights with bowls of this thick, cheesy soup that captures the zippy flavors of the Southwest.—Beverly Matthews, Pasco, Washington Go to Recipe Warm up weeknights with bowls of this thick, cheesy soup that captures the zippy flavors of the Southwest.—Andrea Early, Harrisonburg, Virginia Go to Recipe Gently spiced corn chowder is always a good option for kids, but feel free to rev up yours with hot pepper sauce.Taste of Home Lemon-Garlic Hummus You'll need just five ingredients to blend together this smooth and creamy bean dip.—Kris Capener, Ogden, Utah Go to Recipe You'll need just five ingredients to blend together this smooth and creamy bean dip.—Taste of Home Test Kitchen, Milwaukee, Wisconsin Go to Recipe This satisfying soup gets its Italian flair from fennel, thyme, basil and orzo pasta.—Taste of Home Test Kitchen Go to Recipe Turn carrot sticks into fun "fries" with a happier health profile by popping them in the oven and serving them fry-style.—Teresa Jacobson, St. Johns, Florida Go to Recipe My mother-in-law raves about the chicken and rice soup we serve at our house.—Donna Lamano, Olathe, Kansas Go to Recipe These colorful vegetables boasting a subtle herb flavor roast to perfection and are guaranteed to become a holiday favorite.—Shannon Reynoso, Bakersfield, California Go to Recipe Adding white wine, lemon juice and garlic gives a little kick to green beans.— Heather Thurmeier, Pense, Saskatchewan Go to Recipe What a treat to come home from work and have this savory soup ready to eat.Spicy Pumpkin & Corn Soup A seriously quick dish, it can satisfy a hungry household in 15 minutes.My family loves sharing this soup with cornbread, or you can add a zesty kick with some Rotel.— Heather Rorex, Winnemucca, Nevada Go to Recipe A seriously quick dish, it can satisfy a hungry household in 15 minutes.My family loves sharing this soup with cornbread, or you can add a zesty kick with some Rotel.—Amy Cheatham, Sandusky, Ohio Go to Recipe This satisfying veggie soup hits the spot at lunch or dinner.Veggie Chowder Packed with potatoes, carrots and corn, this soup is a great healthy dinner choice.—Vicki Kerr, Portland, Maine Go to Recipe Packed with potatoes, carrots and corn, this soup is a great healthy dinner choice.—Cathy Pawlowski, Naperville, Illinois Go to Recipe A tangy salad of romaine, celery and oranges with tarragon vinegar and hot pepper sauce makes a cool companion for turkey dishes.—Jean Keiser, West Chester, Pennsylvania Go to Recipe I order cauliflower mash every time we visit our favorite restaurant.Mom's Chicken Noodle Soup My mother was a pastor's wife, and she did a lot of cooking for potlucks.—Marlene Doolittle, Story City, Iowa Go to Recipe My mother was a pastor's wife, and she did a lot of cooking for potlucks.—Donna Morgan, Hend, Tennessee Go to Recipe I like to top bowls of this tasty soup with a little grated Parmesan cheese, and serve it with crusty bread to round out the meal.Every time I serve this type of soup , I remember my southern grandma, who was very special to me and was known as an outstanding cook.—Robin Haas, Cranston, Rhode, Island Go to Recipe This lower-fat soup is creamy, really intense in flavor and offers 545 mg of potassium.—Sally Goeb, New Egypt, New Jersey Go to Recipe Hot soup on a cold day is something I just can't get enough of.Spiced Garlic Carrots This classic Moroccan side dish is served as often as possible, hot or as a cold salad, in most Sephardic Jewish homes.The natural sweetness of the carrots tempers the garlic and balances the sizzle of the pepper flakes.—David Feder, Buffalo Grove, Illinois Go to Recipe This classic Moroccan side dish is served as often as possible, hot or as a cold salad, in most Sephardic Jewish homes.The natural sweetness of the carrots tempers the garlic and balances the sizzle of the pepper flakes.—Zan Brock, Jasper, Alabama Go to Recipe Instead of the usual side dishes, consider serving a vegetable-laden soup at Thanksgiving or other holidays.—Mary Walters, Westerville, Ohio Go to Recipe This citrusy tea accented with tarragon is the perfect way to warm up a chilly winter's afternoon.—Doris Heath, Franklin, North Carolina Go to Recipe This refreshing fruit salad has a hint of mint, honey and ginger that adds subtle flavor to the sweet combination of melons, grapefruit, oranges, pineapple and bananas.—Pam Correll, Brockport, Pennsylvania Go to Recipe While traveling to Taiwan, I had the pleasure of trying a unique vegetable dish that included fresh pumpkin.—Justin Weber, Milwaukee, Wisconsin Go to Recipe My wife loves chai, but I have never been satisfied with any of the store-bought mixes, so I created my own. .

Sprouts can make you sick — and this is why

Strutting over in your favorite outfit, you’ll open the door to the sandwich joint, walk up to order, and then see it: A warning that eating sprouts can make you sick. .

One Major Side Effect of Eating Brussels Sprouts, Says Science

Brussels sprouts were never glamorized in the same way other vegetables like buttery corn on the cob or celery sticks with peanut butter were during childhood.Roasted Brussels sprouts may not be palatable to all, but even those who enjoy the slightly bitter taste and crispy exterior may not tolerate the vegetable well—digestively speaking.As a member of the cruciferous vegetable family—whose relatives include other hard-to-digest veggies such as cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower—Brussels sprouts contain a type of carbohydrate known as raffinose. .

10 Healthy Foods That Can Make You Feel Gross

If ditching refined, white carbs is the obvious healthy choice, then why is it that whole-wheat toast or linguine can still make us feel heavy?Fiber is an indigestible carbohydrate and quickly increasing your intake or eating too much at once can cause gas, bloating, and belching, explains nutritionist Kristin Kirkpatrick, RD, wellness manager at the Cleveland Clinic.?If you're making the switch or upping fiber in your diet, increase it slowly to give your body time to adjust and drink water with any fiber-rich meal to help move digestion along.?But certain brands contain carrageenan, a thickening agent derived from seaweed that has been linked to digestive problems, including inflammatory bowel disease, says Katie Cavuto, RD, a Philadelphia-based nutritionist.If your cup of tea is causing you to be woozy, switch to some non-caffeinated herbal varieties like chamomile and peppermint, which also deliver health perks.Steaming is an easy hack that not only breaks down the raffinose to make vegetables easier to digest, it also helps preserve the cancer-kicking compounds, which can be lost when boiling or in the microwave."Eating too much dairy leads to digestion in the large intestine instead of the stomach, which can result in symptoms such as diarrhea and gas," explains Cavuto."It's worth noting that some hard cheeses like Parmesan and cheddar and fermented dairy products, like kefir, are lower in lactose and more tolerable," Cavuto says.Aim for three servings of dairy per day and remember that nutrients such as calcium can come from non-dairy sources like dark leafy greens and sardines, too.Rinse canned beans before using and soak the dry variety overnight in water and baking soda to reduce the starches and help ease the post-dinner toot.If you're not a bean fiend, it helps to gradually up consumption over a couple weeks and eat them on the regular so you won't be bothered by gas, she says.Chewing on a stick of gum could help keep teeth healthy and has even been shown to boost concentration, but the breath-freshening solution could be the sneaky culprit behind your bloat."When you're constantly chewing, you're also swallowing air which gets trapped in the intestines and causes gas and that uncomfortable feeling of fullness," says Kirkpatrick.What's more, a 2008 German study revealed that the biggest sugarless gum-chewers—16 to 20 sticks a day—risked not only gas and bloating, but also severe diarrhea and unexpected weight loss, all thanks to sorbitol. .

Health Benefits of Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are in the cruciferous family -- relatives of broccoli, cauliflower, collard greens, and kale.Health Benefits Brussels sprouts have a lot of a natural, sulfur-based substance with a name that's a bit of a tongue twister: glycosinolate glucobrassicin.Eating a lot of Brussels sprouts and other cruciferous veggies may help protect against cancers of the stomach, lungs, kidney, breast, bladder, and prostate.Brussels sprouts also have carotenoids, colorful pigments found in plants, which are good for your eyes. .

Can Dogs Eat Brussels Sprouts? – American Kennel Club

This cruciferous vegetable is loaded with nutrients, like vitamins, fiber, and antioxidants that are good for humans and canines, alike.Brussels sprouts contain vitamin K, which helps blood clot properly, builds bones, and protects the heart.So, if Brussels sprouts are so good for your dog, why not feed him a hearty helping each day?Sprouts contain a high level of a substance called isothiocyanate that improves the intestinal muscle's ability to push food and waste through the gastrointestinal tract.This nutritious veggie has no toxins or poisons, and there’s no immediate cause for alarm if your dog experiences a temporary stomach upset or a record-setting level of flatulence.If your dog has any dietary or allergic issues, do not feed him Brussels sprouts without first consulting your veterinarian.If your dog is cleared to eat this vegetable, start by giving him a small portion, 1/2-to-1 sprout, depending on his size. .

Beer, Wine and Brussels Sprouts – Their Toxic Link -

Arsenic is a semi-metal on the periodic table of elements that is odorless and tasteless and goes unnoticed in certain foods and water.It gets into the water system from environmental runoff contained in pesticides, glass and electronic waste, and wood treatment.General: Cancer of the bladder, lungs, kidney, prostate, skin, nasal passages, liver.Yet, even with the EPA protections in place, recent research out of Dartmouth College reveals that, if you drink more than a few glasses of beer and white wine per week, you could be significantly upping your intake of arsenic.The researchers measured the levels of arsenic in the study participants by analyzing toenail clippings.The researchers found that those who consumed more beer and wine and ate more Brussels sprouts had the highest levels of arsenic in their toenail clippings.In addition, their study notes several foods you may be eating that can contribute to building up too much arsenic:.Their study notes the sulfur compounds in Brussels sprouts as binding to arsenic so that it may not metabolize as quickly as it should.This finding is contradictory, though, to advice from other health researchers that recommends high sulfur foods as a method of detoxing arsenic from your body.Dark meat fish contains arsenic metabolites that are not safely metabolized by the human body.With the results of these findings, you may want to cut down on your beer and wine consumption as well as limit Brussels sprouts, and other high sulfur containing vegetables.Since many people over the age of 40 have B12 deficiencies, from the inability of their gut to absorb it, it’s a good idea to have your B12 levels checked.Fiber binds to heavy metals in the intestines and pulls them out of your body through elimination before they can enter your bloodstream.As I’ve noted above, some of the findings of this new research is contradictory to what’s previously been recommended as natural detox methods for arsenic.Yet, I feel it’s wise to not eat high sulfur containing vegetables raw as cooking/steaming can decrease their arsenic content.Limiting alcohol consumption from beer and wine to a few drinks a week is a smart health move regardless of their arsenic content. .

At last a reason to avoid them! Too many sprouts could leave you in

Christmas favourite: Brussels sprouts contain high levels of vitamin K, which can interfere with blood thinning drugs if eaten to excess.But he was admitted to the specialist heart unit at the Golden Jubilee National Hospital in Clydebank, West Dunbartonshire, after his condition dramatically worsened.Consultant cardiologist Dr Roy Gardner said: 'Patients who are taking anticoagulants are generally advised not to eat too many green leafy vegetables, as they are full of vitamin K, which antagonise the action of this vital medication.'.While Warfarin can generally balance out levels in the diet any sudden changes - such as gorging on Brussel sprouts - could put patients at risk. .

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