As nouns the difference between greens and cabbage is that greens is (green) while cabbage is an edible plant (brassica oleracea var capitata ) having a head of green leaves.As verbs the difference between greens and cabbage is that greens is (green) while cabbage is to form a head like that of the cabbage; as, to make lettuce cabbage.Collardgreens vs Cabbage Greens vs Cabbageimportantinfoaboutacabbage Cabbages vs Greens greens English Noun (head) (plurale tantum) The leaves of certain edible green plants, especially of brassicas, eaten as a vegetable.(uncountable) The leaves of this plant eaten as a vegetable.(uncountable, slang) Cloth or clippings cabbaged or purloined by one who cuts out garments.Synonyms * (plant) cabbage plant, cole * (leaves of this plant eaten as a vegetable) cole, greens * (person with severely reduced mental capacities due to brain damage) vegetable Verb (cabbag) To form a head like that of the cabbage. .

Cabbage

Leafy vegetable in the flowering plant family Brassicaceae.Cabbage, comprising several cultivars of Brassica oleracea, is a leafy green, red (purple), or white (pale green) biennial plant grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads.oleracea), and belongs to the "cole crops" or brassicas, meaning it is closely related to broccoli and cauliflower (var.Cabbage is prone to several nutrient deficiencies, as well as to multiple pests, and bacterial and fungal diseases.Cabbage was most likely domesticated somewhere in Europe before 1000 BC, although savoys were not developed until the 16th century AD.By the Middle Ages, cabbage had become a prominent part of European cuisine.Cabbage.Cabbage (Brassica oleracea or B. oleracea var.All of these developed from the wild cabbage B. oleracea var.oleracea, also called colewort or field cabbage.This original species evolved over thousands of years into those seen today, as selection resulted in cultivars having different characteristics, such as large heads for cabbage, large leaves for kale and thick stems with flower buds for broccoli."Cabbage" was originally used to refer to multiple forms of B. oleracea, including those with loose or non-existent heads.[5] A related species, Brassica rapa, is commonly named Chinese, napa or celery cabbage, and has many of the same uses.[5] Many European and Asiatic names for cabbage are derived from the Celto-Slavic root cap or kap, meaning "head".The cabbage inflorescence , which appears in the plant's second year of growth, features white or yellow flowers, each with four perpendicularly arranged petals.Plants are 40–60 cm (16–24 in) tall in their first year at the mature vegetative stage, and 1.5–2.0 m (4 ft 11 in–6 ft 7 in) tall when flowering in the second year.[13] Heads average between 0.5 and 4 kg (1 and 8 lb), with fast-growing, earlier-maturing varieties producing smaller heads.[9] About 90 percent of the root mass is in the upper 20–30 cm (8–12 in) of soil; some lateral roots can penetrate up to 2 m (6 ft 7 in) deep.[9] The initial leaves form a rosette shape comprising 7 to 15 leaves, each measuring 25–35 cm (10–14 in) by 20–30 cm (8–12 in);[13] after this, leaves with shorter petioles develop and heads form through the leaves cupping inward.Many shapes, colors and leaf textures are found in various cultivated varieties of cabbage.Leaf types are generally divided between crinkled-leaf, loose-head savoys and smooth-leaf firm-head cabbages, while the color spectrum includes white and a range of greens and purples.The appearance of the cabbage head has been given importance in selective breeding, with varieties being chosen for shape, color, firmness and other physical characteristics.[32] The ancient Greeks had some varieties of cabbage, as mentioned by Theophrastus, although whether they were more closely related to today's cabbage or to one of the other Brassica crops is unknown.The Greeks were convinced that cabbages and grapevines were inimical, and that cabbage planted too near the vine would impart its unwelcome odor to the grapes; this Mediterranean sense of antipathy survives today.[39] Pliny the Elder listed seven varieties, including Pompeii cabbage, Cumae cabbage and Sabellian cabbage.[5] During the 16th century, German gardeners developed the savoy cabbage.Cultivation [ edit ].[14] Seedlings typically emerge in about 4–6 days from seeds planted 13 mm (1⁄2 in) deep at a soil temperature between 20 and 30 °C (68 and 86 °F).Some varieties of cabbage have been developed for ornamental use; these are generally called "flowering cabbage".They do not produce heads and feature purple or green outer leaves surrounding an inner grouping of smaller leaves in white, red, or pink.[14] Early varieties of cabbage take about 70 days from planting to reach maturity, while late varieties take about 120 days.The outer leaves are trimmed, and any diseased, damaged, or necrotic leaves are removed.[59] Delays in harvest can result in the head splitting as a result of expansion of the inner leaves and continued stem growth.Savoy – Characterized by crimped or curly leaves, mild flavor and tender texture [24].Green – Light to dark green, slightly pointed heads.White, also called Dutch – Smooth, pale green leaves[24].Some sources only delineate three cultivars: savoy, red and white, with spring greens and green cabbage being subsumed under the last.Cultivation problems [ edit ].Rhizoctonia solani causes the post-emergence disease wirestem, resulting in killed seedlings ("damping-off"), root rot or stunted growth and smaller heads.Pests include root-knot nematodes and cabbage maggots, which produce stunted and wilted plants with yellow leaves; aphids, which induce stunted plants with curled and yellow leaves; harlequin cabbage bugs, which cause white and yellow leaves; thrips, which lead to leaves with white-bronze spots; striped flea beetles, which riddle leaves with small holes; and caterpillars, which leave behind large, ragged holes in leaves.[64] The caterpillar stage of the "small cabbage white butterfly" (Pieris rapae), commonly known in the United States as the "imported cabbage worm", is a major cabbage pest in most countries.[67] In India, the diamondback moth has caused losses up to 90 percent in crops that were not treated with insecticide.Production [ edit ].Local market and storage [ edit ].Consumption [ edit ].Food preparation [ edit ].[77] In the United States, cabbage is used primarily for the production of coleslaw, followed by market use and sauerkraut production.Nutrients and phytochemicals [ edit ].[80] Cabbage is also a moderate source (10–19% DV) of vitamin B6 and folate, with no other nutrients having significant content per 100-gram serving (table).[81] Studies on cruciferous vegetables, including cabbage, include whether they may lower the risk against colon cancer.[82] Cabbage is a source of indole-3-carbinol, a chemical under basic research for its possible properties.Herbalism [ edit ].[85] The ancient Roman, Pliny the Elder, described both culinary and medicinal properties of the vegetable.[91] Two outbreaks of E.

coli in the United States have been linked to cabbage consumption.References [ edit ]. .

Using Cabbage Leaves for Weaning, Mastitis, Engorgement, More

Using cabbage leaves for mastitis Hands down, one of the most painful breastfeeding complications is mastitis, inflammation and infection of the breast tissue.Here’s exactly how to use cabbage leaves for relief from symptoms of mastitis: Clean, dry, and chill several cabbage leaves for each breast that you want to treat.You should keep your nipples bare, especially if they’re sore, cracked, or bleeding.If you aren’t weaning, you can use this treatment for 20 minutes three times per day, but not more often — overuse of cabbage leaves can lead to a decrease in milk supply (more on that later!).The review found that using cabbage leaves reduced the pain and hardness of engorged breasts and made it easier for people to continue breastfeeding for longer.Since this is a remedy that can also help dry up your milk supply (aka weaning, which we’ll get to next), you could accidentally decrease your supply if you keep using them after they’ve worked to reduce your swelling.If so, don’t repeat the process — remember that continuing to use cabbage leaves after the engorgement has resolved may cause a decrease in milk supply.If you’re still uncomfortable, the treatment can be used two or three times a day while engorgement persists.You can leave cabbage leaves on your breasts until the leaves begin to wilt (rather than for 20 minutes max) and you can repeat the treatment as many times per day as you want.Can I eat cabbage while breastfeeding?But there’s no evidence that when mothers eat gassy foods, those gassy effects are passed down to the baby. .

Cabbage Leaves for Breast Pain, Engorgement, and Weaning

Many breastfeeding moms believe that placing cold cabbage leaves on the breasts is helpful for reducing the pain and breast inflammation that may occur during breastfeeding.Breast engorgement, an overabundant supply of breast milk, or weaning a baby from breastfeeding can cause discomfort.How to Use Cabbage Leaves on Breasts.In the sink, use cold water to rinse off the two leaves you just removed.Once you remove the stem and cut the slit, the leaves will be able to fit nicely over your breasts without covering your nipple.Next, place the clean, cold cabbage leaves on your breasts.While the use of cold compresses or cold cabbage leaves does help to lessen breast swelling and engorgement, it can also lower your milk supply. If you continue to use cold cabbage leaves on your breasts after you relieve the swelling and engorgement, it's possible to end up with a greater decrease in your breast milk supply than you were expecting. .

Know Your Cabbages! Green, Red, Savoy, Napa, and More

Choy Sum – We’re including this one just because we’ve seen it a lot at our regular grocery store. .

Kale, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and cabbage are all varieties of

This makes it pretty interesting that kale and cabbage — along with broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, collard greens, and kohlrabi, and several other vegetables — all come from the exact same plant species: Brassica oleracea.That wild form — which still exists and is known as wild mustard — looks like this:.To maximize the amount of food they got from it, they preferentially planted seeds from plants that grew more leaves, and after many generations, this sort of artificial selection produced a leafy version of wild mustard that looked more like modern-day kale or collard greens.Though they're all the same species, these various crops are cultivars — different varieties bred to have desirable qualities for human purposes. .

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