While it may look a lot like lettuce, it actually belongs to the Brassica genus of vegetables, which includes broccoli, cauliflower and kale (1).It comes in a variety of shapes and colors, including red, purple, white and green, and its leaves can be either crinkled or smooth.This vegetable has been grown around the world for thousands of years and can be found in a variety of dishes, including sauerkraut, kimchi and coleslaw.As you can see in the list above, it is rich in vitamin B6 and folate, both of which are essential for many important processes in the body, including energy metabolism and the normal functioning of the nervous system.In addition, cabbage is high in fiber and contains powerful antioxidants, including polyphenols and sulfur compounds (2).Cabbage is especially high in vitamin C, a potent antioxidant that may protect against heart disease, certain cancers and vision loss ( 3 , 4 , 5 ).In fact, research has shown that eating more cruciferous vegetables reduces certain blood markers of inflammation ( 8 ).Collagen gives structure and flexibility to the skin and is critical for the proper functioning of the bones, muscles and blood vessels ( 12 ).Vitamin C works to protect the body from damage caused by free radicals, which has been associated with many chronic diseases, including cancer ( 14 ).In fact, a recent analysis of 21 studies found that the risk of lung cancer decreased by 7% for each daily 100-mg increase in vitamin C intake ( 17 ).However, this study was limited because it could not determine whether the decreased risk of lung cancer was caused by vitamin C or other compounds found in fruits and vegetables.One cup (89 grams) of chopped red cabbage packs in 85% of the recommended intake for vitamin C, which is the same amount found in a small orange (21).Insoluble fiber helps keep the digestive system healthy by adding bulk to stools and promoting regular bowel movements ( 22 ).These bacteria perform important functions like protecting the immune system and producing critical nutrients like vitamins K2 and B12 ( 24 , 25 ).May Help Keep Your Heart Healthy Red cabbage contains powerful compounds called anthocyanins.Many studies have found a link between eating foods rich in this pigment and a reduced risk of heart disease ( 26 ).In a study including 93,600 women, researchers found that those with a higher intake of anthocyanin-rich foods had a much lower risk of a heart attack ( 27 ).It found that increasing flavonoid intake by 10 mg per day was associated with a 5% lower risk of heart disease (28).Increasing your intake of dietary anthocyanins has also been shown to reduce blood pressure and the risk of coronary artery disease ( 29 , 30 ).Inflammation is known to play a major role in the development of heart disease, and anthocyanins’ protective effect against it is likely due to their anti-inflammatory qualities.However, recent evidence suggests that increasing your dietary potassium is just as important for lowering blood pressure (33).Eating more potassium-rich cabbage is a delicious way to lower high blood pressure and may help keep it within a healthy range (33).A large analysis of 67 studies showed that when people ate 2–10 grams of soluble fiber per day, they experienced a small, yet significant, decrease in LDL cholesterol levels of roughly 2.2 mg per deciliter ( 38 ).Increasing phytosterol intake by 1 gram per day has been found to reduce LDL cholesterol concentrations by as much as 5% ( 40 ).Cabbage is a terrific source of vitamin K1, delivering 85% of the recommended daily amount in a single cup (89 grams) (2).Without vitamin K, the blood would lose its ability to clot properly, increasing the risk of excessive bleeding.It can be eaten raw or cooked and added to a wide variety of dishes like salads, soups, stews and slaws.No matter how you prepare cabbage, adding this cruciferous vegetable to your plate is a tasty way to benefit your health. .

Cabbage: Health benefits, facts, research

Many studies have suggested that increasing consumption of plant-based foods like cabbage decreases the risk of diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and overall mortality.A compound found in cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables known as 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM) has been shown to increase short-term survival rates in some animal studies on radiation.Research over the past 30 years has consistently shown that consuming cruciferous vegetables is associated with a lower risk of cancer.Promising results at the molecular level have been seen with multiple types of cancers, including melanoma, esophageal, prostate, and pancreatic.Researchers have discovered that sulforaphane has the power to inhibit the harmful enzyme histone deacetylase (HDAC), known to be involved in the progression of cancer cells.The ability to stop HDAC enzymes could make sulforaphane-containing foods a potentially powerful part of cancer treatment.The same potent anthocyanins in red cabbage that help protect against cancer have been shown to suppress the inflammation that may lead to cardiovascular disease.Healthy microbes generate an acidic environment to preserve and develop flavor; the enzymes produced in fermentation make vitamins and minerals easier to absorb.Recent studies have shown that dietary fiber may even play a role in regulating the immune system and inflammation, consequently decreasing the risk of inflammation-related conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and obesity. .

Cabbage Juice: Uses, Benefits, and Side Effects

Cabbage juice is loaded with nutrients, such as vitamins C and K, and drinking it is linked to many purported benefits, including weight loss, improved gut health, decreased inflammation, balanced hormones, and body detoxification.These include sulforaphane, a sulfur compound found in many Brassica vegetables, and kaempferol, a potent antioxidant with anti-inflammatory effects ( 8 , 9 ).In a group of mice with contact dermatitis, an inflammatory skin condition, topically applied cabbage extract ointment significantly reduced inflammation ( 11 ).May benefit gut health Drinking cabbage juice may help prevent and treat stomach ulcers.In fact, cabbage juice has been used as a traditional remedy for stomach ulcers, with some dated research suggesting that it may be an effective treatment ( 12 , 13 , 14 ).Although current human research is limited, recent animal studies have shown that cabbage juice may help heal stomach ulcers.The juice that results from making sauerkraut, a type of fermented cabbage, is high in lactic acid bacteria.Studies show drinking its juice results in better absorption of beta carotene, compared with eating whole cabbage ( 21 , 22 ).Studies show drinking its juice results in better absorption of beta carotene, compared with eating whole cabbage ( , ).Due to the difference in volume, it’s easier to consume a lot of cabbage in juice form, compared with eating it raw.In fact, a few studies have noted a correlation between cruciferous vegetable intake and the risk of thyroid cancer, although the results were somewhat inconclusive ( 23 , 24 , 25 ).However, a significant amount of research on cruciferous vegetables and disease prevention suggests that the benefits may outweigh the potential risks ( 27 , 28 ).Fiber promotes feelings of fullness, maintains your gut health, helps stabilize blood sugar, and can reduce cholesterol ( 30 , 31 ).Largely due to their high fiber content, cruciferous vegetables like cabbage have been acknowledged for their ability to positively alter gut bacteria ( 32 ).It’s also high in fructans, a type of carb that individuals with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) often have a difficult time digesting ( 33 ).Even with low intakes of cabbage, people with IBS may experience symptoms, such as bloating, abdominal pain, and diarrhea ( 34 ).However, individuals with IBS and those taking certain medications should check with their healthcare provider before incorporating cabbage juice into their diets. .

13 Health Benefits of Cabbage

It turns out this humble cruciferous vegetable has such a dense nutritional profile, it should probably grace your plate more often than just once or twice a year.It comes in several varieties—green, red, and savoy—which can be eaten raw* or cooked, thrown in a soup, tossed in a salad or stir fry, topped on fish tacos, or simply just steamed by itself.The inexpensiveness and health benefits of cabbage earned it its nickname “drug of the poor” during the Middle Ages.If you are truly trying to improve your diet, adding this cruciferous vegetable to your meal plan is a good place to start.Its fiber and water content can help to prevent constipation and maintain a healthy digestive tract.Eating cabbage in fermented form (sauerkraut) also gives you a boost of probiotics, one of the best things for a healthy digestive system and gut.Cabbage is frequently recommended to people who want to lose weight since it is packed with so many nutrients and its high fiber content makes it quite filling.Its fiber and nutrients bind with bile acids in the intestine and pass out in the stool, rather than being absorbed into the blood.Anthocyanins, the powerful antioxidants that give red cabbage its vibrant color, have been shown to slow the formation and even kill already-formed cancer cells.Glutamine, an amino acid found in cabbage, is a strong anti-inflammatory agent, helping to reduce joint pain, arthritis, and ease allergies.Reduces the Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke: Researchers have identified nearly twenty different flavonoids and fifteen different phenols in cabbage, all which demonstrate antioxidant activity.Next time you feel sluggish, swap out that cup of afternoon sugary coffee for a serving of cabbage—coleslaw might make the perfect snack!Fun Fact: One cup of shredded raw cabbage contains 190% of the recommended daily amount of vitamin C. .

Simple and Easy Boiled Cabbage Recipe

This basic boiled cabbage recipe calls for just four ingredients—cabbage, butter, salt, and pepper—and it cooks in about 20 minutes. .

Cabbage: Health Benefits May Surprise You

Did you know the USDA reports cabbage is the second most economical vegetable, (after potato), on your grocery list?These cruciferous vegetables derived their name from the shape of their flowers, which have 4 petals resembling a cross.This family of vegetables also includes cauliflower, broccoli, bok choy, kale, kohlrabi, collard and mustard greens, and of course, Brussels sprouts.Substitute cabbage, since it has all the health benefits of other cruciferous vegetables, but with a milder flavor.Cabbage is high in carotenoids like lutein, which helps protect your eyes from developing macular degeneration as you age.Traditional methods of steaming or boiling cabbage can extract flavor and nutrients.Use the leaves (cooked or raw) like bread or tortillas to hold sandwich fillings, meat, beans or rice dishes, or bake up delicious stuffed cabbage rolls.The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has found cabbage to be the 2nd most economical vegetable (potatoes came in 1st).A bag of shredded cabbage will save you time, but usually costs you more than an uncut head and might not keep as long.Notes: Enjoy the sweet mild flavor of cooked cabbage or spice it up with your favorite seasoning!Recipe and fact sheet provided by Oregon State University Extension Service with Healthy Bytes Community Networking Initiative. .

Boiled Cabbage: Fast, Easy and Highly Nutritious

Cabbage is a cruciferous vegetable in the same family as broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, collard greens, Swiss chard and others. .

Fact or Fiction: Raw Veggies are Healthier than Cooked Ones

It softens food, such as cellulose fiber and raw meat, that our small teeth, weak jaws and digestive systems aren't equipped to handle.Several studies conducted in recent years (at Harvard Medical School, among others) have linked high intake of lycopene with a lower risk of cancer and heart attacks.Rui Hai Liu, an associate professor of food science at Cornell University who has researched lycopene, says that it may be an even more potent antioxidant than vitamin C.Cooked carrots, spinach, mushrooms, asparagus, cabbage, peppers and many other vegetables also supply more antioxidants, such as carotenoids and ferulic acid, to the body than they do when raw, Liu says.Deep fried foods are notorious sources of free radicals, caused by oil being continuously oxidized when it is heated at high temperatures.A 2002 study in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences also found that sulforaphane may help fight the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which causes ulcers and increases a person's risk of stomach cancer.Specific polyphenols have been shown to have antioxidant properties and to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer, according to a 2005 report in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.Comparing the healthfulness of raw and cooked food is complicated, and there are still many mysteries surrounding how the different molecules in plants interact with the human body. .

The health benefits of the traditional Saint Patrick's Day boiled dinner

Janette Gaumer RD/LD, CHC, Dietitian and Certified Health/Wellness Coach for Speare Memorial Hospital says “Don’t deny yourself of special meals….like the St. Patrick’s Day dinner.This meal can be healthy if you limit your meat to the size of a deck of cards (3 oz) and load your plate with vegetables.That traditional boiled dinner offers many health benefits and is made up of corned beef, cabbage, potatoes, onions, carrots, and white turnips.The health benefits of cabbage include frequent use as a treatment for constipation, stomach ulcers, headaches, obesity, skin disorders, eczema, jaundice, scurvy, rheumatism, arthritis, gout, eye disorders, heart diseases, aging, and Alzheimer’s disease.A small (2-1/2 inch) unpeeled boiled potato is also good source of fiber, offering 35% more than its skinless counterpart.Phytochemicals, or phytonutrients, are naturally occurring compounds in fruits and vegetables that are able to react with the human body to trigger healthy reactions.Aim to fill at least half your plate with vegetables too and those potassium-rich veggies will help balance some effects of the sodium, particularly if you have high blood pressure.

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