This popular and versatile veggie may taste slightly different depending on the color, size, and where it's grown.The sugar in carrots gives them a slightly sweet flavor, but they also can taste earthy or bitter.Studies have found that it can help with or prevent age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of vision loss in the U.S.Antioxidants have been proven to fight off harmful free radicals in your body, and that can make you less likely to have cancer.And third, they have fiber, which can help you stay at a healthy weight and lower your chances of heart disease. .

Carrots 101: Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits

Carrots are a particularly good source of beta carotene, fiber, vitamin K1, potassium, and antioxidants ( 1 ).They’re a weight-loss-friendly food and have been linked to lower cholesterol levels and improved eye health.What’s more, their carotene antioxidants have been linked to a reduced risk of cancer.2.8 grams Fat: 0.2 grams Carbs Carrots are mainly composed of water and carbs.Vitamins and minerals Carrots are a good source of several vitamins and minerals, especially biotin, potassium, and vitamins A (from beta carotene), K1 (phylloquinone), and B6.Vitamin K1: Also known as phylloquinone, vitamin K1 is important for blood coagulation and can promote bone health ( 17 , 18 ).They are also a good source of several B vitamins, as well as vitamin K and potassium.Eating fat with carrots can help you absorb more of the beta carotene ( 19 ).The main plant compounds in carrots are: Beta carotene: Orange carrots are very high in beta carotene.Orange carrots are very high in beta carotene.SUMMARY Carrots are a great source of many plant compounds, especially carotenoids, such as beta carotene and lutein.Reduced risk of cancer Diets rich in carotenoids may help protect against several types of cancer.Lower blood cholesterol High blood cholesterol is a well-known risk factor for heart disease.Eye health Individuals with low vitamin A levels are more likely to experience night blindness, a condition that may diminish by eating carrots or other foods rich in vitamin A or carotenoids ( 34 ).SUMMARY Eating carrots is linked to a reduced risk of cancer and heart disease, as well as improved eye health.Studies comparing organic and conventionally grown carrots did not find any difference in the amount of carotenoids or antioxidant content and quality ( 38 , 39 , 40 , 41 , 42 ).There’s very little difference in nutrients between regular and baby carrots, and they should have the same health effects.SUMMARY Baby carrots are whole carrots harvested before they grow large, while baby-cut carrots are pieces from larger carrots that have been machine-cut, peeled, polished, and washed before packing.SUMMARY Carrots may cause reactions in people allergic to pollen. .

Carrots: Benefits, nutrition, diet, and risks

In this article, learn more about the nutrients in carrots and their health benefits.Some people think of carrots as the ultimate health food, while generations of parents have told their children that eating carrots will help them see in the dark.Antioxidants are nutrients present in plant-based foods.Carrots contain vitamin A, and a vitamin A deficiency may result in xerophthalmia, a progressive eye disease.The findings of a study published the following year suggest that people who consume a high-fiber diet have a lower risk of colorectal cancer than those who consume little fiber.Carrots have a sweet flavor and contain natural sugars.What does this mean for people with diabetes?This index can help people with diabetes understand which foods are likely to raise their blood sugar levels.This means that they are unlikely to trigger a blood sugar spike and are safe for people with diabetes to eat.Meanwhile, authors of a 2018 review concluded that consuming a high-fiber diet may help prevent the development of type 2 diabetes.High-fiber foods may also help people with type 2 diabetes manage their blood sugar levels.Blood pressure and cardiovascular health.The fiber and potassium in carrots may help manage blood pressure.Meanwhile, a 2017 review concluded that people with a high fiber intake are less likely to develop cardiovascular disease than people who eat little fiber.Which foods may help reduce blood pressure?Another antioxidant that carrots provide is vitamin C.A healthy immune system may prevent a range of diseases, including cancer, according to a 2017 study . .

4 Foods with More Vitamin A than Carrots

While both types are important, you don't have to rely only on carrots to get your fill.Here are some foods that actually have more vitamin A per serving than a half-cup of raw carrots, which comes in at 10,692 international units (IU) of retinol and 0.534 milligrams of beta-carotene.One cup of puree will give you 14,100 IU of retinol and 0.706 milligrams of beta-carotene.Sweet potatoes deliver carb-y satisfaction while still being packed with vitamins, especially A.One potato contains 21,909 IU of retinol and 1.096 milligrams of beta-carotene, or 438 percent of your daily recommended intake of vitamin A. Oh, and it has more potassium than a banana!Kale is known as a superfood for a reason: Aside from the 70,829 IU of retionol and 3.5 milligrams of beta-carotene in four cups, you’ll get 500 percent of your daily vitamin C and 3,000 percent of your vitamin K.

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Of retinol, ruses and root veggies: The fantastic tale of carrots

Carrots and eye health have some history.By this time, air raid blackouts were a common occurrence, as was civilian food rationing due to widespread shortages of goods.On the one hand, the RAF has worked up something that will change history; on the other, the Ministry of Food intends to promote an easily homegrown substitute for restricted foodstuffs—carrots.Concurrently, the Ministry of Food launched a propaganda campaign that encouraged carrot consumption with a poignant message, "Carrots Keep You Healthy and Help You See in the Dark.".It resonated among blackout-weary civilians, unaware of radar, but nonetheless seeing the RAF success.World War II boosted the carrot's popularity as a nutritious superfood.It comes down to vitamin A.However, there's a distinction to be made when it comes to vitamin A, says Susan Summerton, O.D., a certified nutrition specialist with the Ocular Nutrition Society, and that's between preformed vitamin A and beta carotene."I believe the confusion of terms with the carotenes is because humans can convert carotenes to vitamin A, with beta-carotene being most easily converted to vitamin A," Dr. Summerton says.Preformed vitamin A (retinol) comes only from animal fats that contain active vitamin A—such as liver, eggs, buttercream or cod liver oil—whereas carrots contain beta carotene, a provitamin A that is bioconverted to vitamin A.However, carrots aren't down and out as a source of eye-healthy nutrients.Beta carotene-rich carrots can help eye health, especially in at-risk populations otherwise deficient in vitamin A; however, not to the same extent that the animal-based retinol form of vitamin A will help.Whether a liver lover or carrot craver, your eyes will thank you. .

Which Vitamins Are in Carrots?

One cup of raw, chopped carrots provides about 50 calories and 430 percent of the daily value for vitamin A, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.Carrots are also an excellent source of vitamin K. Although your body can manufacture this fat-soluble nutrient from bacteria in your gut, you still need a small amount each day to protect against deficiency.Vitamin K is mainly required for blood to clot, but it's also thought to play an important role in building and maintaining healthy bones.This antioxidant nutrient plays an essential role in the production of the tissues that make up your blood vessels, bones, teeth, gums, muscle and skin.It also supports immune system function and helps your body absorb the iron in beans, grains and other plant-based foods.The vegetable's beta-carotene becomes more accessible when its tough cell walls are slightly broken down, and fat helps your body absorb beta-carotene.Steamed carrots can be pureed and used to make a naturally sweet condiment for grilled fish or a rich, creamy soup. .

Reasons Why Carrots (of All Colors) Are Healthy For You

Packed with vitamins, minerals and fiber, no wonder this veggie is a fan favorite.Advertising Policy Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center.The nutrition facts for 1/2 cup of raw carrots are:.Dietary fiber: 2.8 grams.With only 41 calories in 1/2 cup, this delicious food is packed with health benefits.They’re a great source of vitamin A .Plus, one study noted that women who have high circulating levels of carotenoids may also have a reduced risk of breast cancer.Plus, one study noted that women who have high circulating levels of carotenoids may also have a reduced risk of breast cancer.However, studies found that eating more carrots has been linked to lower cholesterol levels, thereby decreasing your risk for heart disease.However, studies found that eating more carrots has been linked to lower cholesterol levels, thereby decreasing your risk for heart disease.Since 1/2 cup of carrots only have 41 calories, they can actually help you feel fuller longer and in turn, decrease the amount of calories you eat.Whatever their color, all carrots are filled with nutrients — so why not sample the rainbow?Orange : The classic color you probably think of when you think of carrots, orange carrots are higher in beta carotene, an antioxidant pigment (the carotenoid mentioned above).: The classic color you probably think of when you think of carrots, orange carrots are higher in beta carotene, an antioxidant pigment (the carotenoid mentioned above).Yellow : These also contain beta carotene and lutein, a carotenoid researchers think may protect the eyes, since antioxidants help shield cells from damage.: These also contain beta carotene and lutein, a carotenoid researchers think may protect the eyes, since antioxidants help shield cells from damage. .

Vitamin A - Consumer Health News

Why do I need vitamin A?That old tale is actually true -- the beta carotene in carrots and many other vegetables is converted in the intestines to vitamin A (also known as retinol), and vitamin A is undoubtedly good for the eyes.The recommended daily allowance is 700 micrograms a day for women an 900 micrograms a day for men.In fact, the Institute of Medicine recommends against beta carotene or vitamin A supplements except in certain cases.Can I get too much vitamin A?Your body won't turn these pigments into vitamin A unless there's a need. .

9 Health and Beauty Benefits of Carrots

Keep Hair Happy and Healthy.Easily one of the top beauty benefits of carrots is gorgeous hair. .

Are you getting enough vitamin A? Probably, but half of the world isn

According to the World Health Organization, vitamin A deficiency affects children and adults in more than half of all the countries in the world, contributing to blindness in children, chronic illness and death from infections.The body absorbs vitamin A from two primary sources: preformed vitamin A which is found in animal products, such as dairy and meat, and provitamin A from plants.The body makes provitamin A out of plant pigments, particularly beta-carotene found in fruits and vegetables.The body makes provitamin A out of plant pigments, particularly beta-carotene found in fruits and vegetables.The best sources of vitamin A according to the National Institutes of Health are organ meats such as liver, broccoli, sweet red peppers, carrots, cantaloupe, dairy, mangos, apricots, squash, sweet potatoes, spinach, salmon and, in the United States, fortified breakfast cereals.Xerophthalmia is a chronic eye dryness that causes poor night vision and can eventually destroy the corneas and lead to blindness.Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of preventable blindness in children, according to the World Health Organization.The deficiency seriously impacts children and pregnant women. .

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