Concerning length of therapy and vast majority of side effects, herbal medication may be suitable substitute for these drugs.In this single-blind, placebo controlled study, lipid profiles of 150 hyperlipidemic patients in cardiology outpatient department of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences were checked at same conditions.All patients were put on NCEP type Π diet and Six weeks later, lipid profiles were checked. .

Effect of garlic powder on performance and lipid profile of broilers

(2001) Body and intestinal growth of broiler chicks on a commercial starter diet.Journal of the American Chemical Society, 60, 1952-1958.Poultry Science, 23, 327-340.[7] Lewis, M.R., Rose, S.P., Mackenzie, A.M. and Tucker, L.A.

(2003) Effects of dietary inclusion of plant extracts on the growth performance of male broiler chickens.Poultry Science, 76, 1264-1271.(1991) Effects of dietary garlic (Allium sativum) on performance, carcass composition and blood chemistry changes in broiler chickens.Canadian Journal of Animal Science, 71, 939-942. doi:10.4141/cjas91-113.(2002) Effects of dietary garlic on cholesterol metabolism in laying hens.Poultry Science, 81:1856-1862.(2004) The effectof a mixture of herbal essential oils or α-tocopheryl acetate on performance parameters and oxidation of body lipid in broilers.South African Journal of Animal Science, 34, 52-61.

doi:10.4314/sajas.v34i1.4039.Poultry Science, 83, 169-174.South African Journal of Animal Science, 35, 61-72.(2009) Effects of alcoholic extract of two herbs (garlic and thymus) on the per-formance and blood lipids of broiler chickens.Journal of Agri-cultural Sciences and Natural Resources, 16, 61-72.(2001) Utilization of garlic (Allium sati-vum L.) as growth promoter of broilers.and Puri, J.P. (2009) Lipid profile of chicken (Gallus domesticus) in response to dietary supplementation of garlic (Allium sativum).International Journal of Poultry Science, 8, 270-276. doi:10.3923/ijps.2009.270.276.Poultry Science, 88, 398-405. doi:10.3382/ps.2008-00179.[31] Raeesi, M., Hoe-ini-Aliabad, S.A., Roofchaee, A., Zare Shahneh, A. and Pirali, S. (2010) Effect of periodically use of garlic (Allium sativum) power on performance and carcass characteristics in droiler chickens.Journal of Essential Oil Research, 10, 618-627.Journal of Animal and Feed Sciences, 12, 583-596.[37] Williams P.

and Losa, R. (2001) The use of essential oils and their compounds in poultry nutrition. .

A meta-analysis of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled

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The Effect of Regular Aerobic Exercise and Garlic Supplementation

The results indicated that garlic supplementation combined with exercise training improved blood pressure but was not effective on lipid profile in inactive subjects.In consistent with our study, Wilmore et al. reported that 20 weeks of regular aerobic activity significantly decreased systolic and diastolic blood pressure among inactive individuals [34].Several mechanisms have been suggested to the blood pressure lowering effect of regular exercise.Decrease in the activity of the autonomic nervous system and following reduction in systemic vascular resistance is most likely involved in the exercise-induced reduction of blood pressure [31].In the present study garlic supplementation alone had no significant effect on blood pressure, but in combination with aerobic training was more effective.Previous studies have suggested several mechanisms by which regular exercise affects lipid profile [44].The lack of exercise effect on lipid profile in the present study might have been attributable to the lack of weight loss during the experimental period. .

Effect of garlic on total serum cholesterol. A meta-analysis

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Health Effects of Garlic

Sulfur compounds, including allicin, appear to be the active components in the root bulb of the garlic plant.C 5 to13 Patients at risk of thrombosis should be advised that garlic may have a modest but significant effect on platelet aggregation compared with placebo.C 5 to13 Patients at risk of thrombosis should be advised that garlic may have a modest but significant effect on platelet aggregation compared with placebo.Historically, garlic has been used around the world to treat many conditions, including hypertension, infections, and snakebites, and some cultures have used it to ward off evil spirits.Allicin is formed when alliin, a sulfur-containing amino acid, comes into contact with the enzyme alliinase when raw garlic is chopped, crushed, or chewed.The antimicrobial, hypolipidemic, antioxidant, and antithrombotic effects that have been attributed to garlic are thought to be related to allicin and other breakdown products.Uses and Efficacy Garlic has been studied extensively in vitro, in animal and human clinical trials, and in epidemiologic evaluations for its multiple medicinal properties.A European trial12 comparing garlic with a commercial lipid-lowering drug (bezafibrate, a fibric acid derivative not available in the United States) found them to be equally effective in decreasing lipids to a statistically significant extent.Only three trials showed a statistically significant reduction in diastolic blood pressure (2 to 7 percent), and one showed a statistically significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (approximately 3 percent) in patients treated with garlic compared with placebo.Contraindications, Adverse Effects, Interactions The ingestion of one to two cloves of raw garlic per day is considered safe in adults. .

Efficacy of Oral Administration of Allium sativum Powder “Garlic

Utilization of herbal remedies, especially garlic extract, in these patients has resulted in promising improvement in lipid profile, inflammation, and cardiovascular markers.Following obtaining laboratory data, BUN, creatinine, Na, K, Ca, Ph, homocysteine, and lipid profile were compared.No significant differences were shown at baselines of outcomes between the garlic and placebo group ( value>0.05).However, there was a significant decrease in absolute values of OXLDL (mean placebo = 979.63, mean garlic = 676.54; value<0.001) and HCY (mean placebo = 36.54, mean garlic = 27.78; value<0.001).In addition, significant treatment differences were seen in change values of Ca (placebo = 1.17, garlic = 0.21; p value = 0.006), TG (placebo = −6.71, garlic = -24.14; value = 0.014), OXLDL (placebo = −281.30, garlic = -699.78; value<0.001), and HCY (placebo = −0.24, garlic = −6.68; value<0.001).In this study, Allium sativum powder demonstrated efficacy in lipid profile improvement and renal protective effects among hemodialysis patients.Hence, we designed this study to assess the efficacy and safety of the garlic extract in reducing inflammatory status, improving lipid profile, and modifying cardiovascular risk factors in hemodialysis patients.In this study, we applied balanced block randomization with a block size of four; then, we used computer-generated random numbers to allocate the sequences.STATA software generated random numbers chains, consisting of one to six until the desired sample size was acquired.Results were compared as garlic arm (before and after receiving garlic for eight weeks in both groups) and placebo arm of the study.Since this is the first study determined to show garlic effects on inflammatory markers and lipid profile in hemodialysis patients, according to the optimal sample size estimation for a pilot randomized trial approach [24], a sample size of 70 precipitants is sufficient enough to detect a clinically significant effect size of 35% between groups, using a two-sided Z-test of the difference between proportions with 90% power and a 5% significance level.Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was measured by the Wintrobe method, and the results were expressed as millimeters in one hour.For each variable, differences of values were calculated before and after each 8-week treatment of garlic powder or placebo and compared between the two arms of the study (garlic arm comparing values before and after garlic intake in both groups, and placebo arm comparing effects of placebo in both groups) using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA).According to the results, no significant differences were shown at baselines of outcomes between the garlic and placebo group ( value>0.05).However, there was a significant decrease in absolute values of OXLDL (mean placebo = 979.63, mean garlic = 676.54; value<0.001) and HCY (mean placebo = 36.54, mean garlic = 27.78; value<0.001).In addition, significant treatment differences were seen in change values of Ca (placebo = 1.17, garlic = 0.21; value = 0.006), TG (placebo = −6.71, garlic = -24.14; value = 0.014), OXLDL (placebo = -281.30, garlic = −699.78; value<0.001), and HCY (placebo = −0.24, garlic = -6.68; value<0.001) (Table 1).Moreover, Table 1 shows the subjects’ mean outcomes including Cr, TG, OXLDL, and HCY, before and after, for patients who received garlic and placebo.Based on the results, mean TG, OXLDL, and HCY in the garlic group were 16.21, 325.27, and 7.29 units lower than in the placebo group controlling other effects including baseline, carryover, and period.Baseline effect Carryover effect: drug-placebo vs. placebo-drug Period effect: period 1 vs. period 2 Treatment effect: drug vs.

placebo Est.Our survey was a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial that was implanted to demonstrate the effect of the garlic extract on some of the inflammatory markers, lipid profile, and renal function tests.We observed that the levels of TAG and OXLDL significantly decreased in the garlic arm of the study, while there was no significant decrease in cholesterol level compared to the placebo group.Another study by Pevez-Torres et al. in 2016 showed that cholesterol levels were reduced by using AGE (aged garlic extract) in metabolic syndrome rats [26].In contrast, the cholesterol levels in the garlic arm of the present study did not decrease more significantly compared to the placebo arm.Particular sample group of patients (hemodialysis patients) and their basal cholesterol level justifies the absence of no significant decrease in cholesterol level.Another review article performed by Yeh et al. in 2001 demonstrated the cholesterol-lowering effects of the garlic extract [31].Comparably, in this study, there was a significant difference in lowering effect of plasma homocysteine in placebo and garlic arms of the study.In a study by Zare et al.

in 2019, performing a parallel double-blinded study, to compare the effect of the garlic extract and placebo in 42 peritoneal dialysis patients, it was revealed that 400 mg of the standardized garlic extract twice a day for 8 weeks resulted in remarkable reduction in inflammatory biomarkers [41].The results of the present study also demonstrate a significant decrease in inflammatory biomarkers of ESR and CRP by using the garlic extract.Concerning the significant role of inflammation and dyslipidemia in cardiovascular mortality risk factors of hemodialysis patients, we suggest the use of garlic in selected patients.The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest. .

The impact of garlic on lipid parameters: a systematic review and

Statistical heterogeneity was calculated using the I 2 statistic.Many sensitivity and subgroup analyses were conducted.Likewise, there exist different preparations of garlic which can potentially deliver differing amounts of potentially active constituents of garlic to the bloodstream and so we performed subgroup analyses based on the type of product including garlic powder, garlic oil and aged extract preparations.As such, we performed subgroup analysis where we calculated garlic's effects based on the mean baseline TC of the patients being studied.As such, we performed subgroup analyses whereby we evaluated studies which required dietary modification or counselled patients on low-fat and low-cholesterol diets independently from the studies where this was not part of the methodology.Study endpoint data extracted included baseline and final TC, LDL, HDL and TAG concentrations and measures of variance for these variables at these time points.For TC, LDL and HDL values reported in mg/dl, the corresponding mmol/l value was calculated by multiplying the value by 0·0259.Studies were excluded if they were not randomised, placebo-controlled and double-blind, combined garlic with other nutraceuticals or products with lipid-altering effects, or lacked sufficient data to allow for statistical pooling.Results were limited to randomised clinical trials in human subjects.Garlic's effect on TC was found to be greater in studies of 12 weeks or longer and with garlic powder, Kwai ® , higher baseline TAG levels, and when diet control was not used.Garlic's effect on TAG was greater in studies of lower Jadad score, and when diet control was not used.No large differences in effects on LDL or HDL were noted for any subgroup analyses.Garlic significantly lowered TAG levels by 0·11 (95 % CI − 0·19, − 0·03) mmol/l (9·7 mg/dl; 97 mg/l) compared with placebo.Overall, garlic was found to significantly reduce the levels of TC by 0·19 (95 % CI − 0·33, − 0·06) mmol/l (7·35 mg/dl; 73·5 mg/l) compared with placebo.There was a moderate amount of statistical heterogeneity among the studies (I 2 64·3 %) and four studies reported 95 % CI that did not cross the pooled effect.When these outlier trials were excluded, TC was reduced by a more moderate 0·12 (95 % CI − 0·21, − 0·04) mmol/l but still to a significant degree, and statistical heterogeneity was reduced (I 2 2·9 %).The 0·19 and 0·11 mmol/l reductions in TC and TAG reductions in the present meta-analysis were modest in size but achieved statistical significance.To compare, the effect of garlic observed in this analysis would equate to a 4 % reduction in TC in a patient with a baseline TC of 5 mmol/l.A patient with a baseline TAG of 2 mmol/l would have a 22 % reduction in TAG with garlic.While LDL was qualitatively reduced and HDL elevated with garlic therapy, these effects were very small ( − 0·05 mmol/l and +0·025 mmol/l, respectively) and did not achieve statistical or clinical significance.An important finding of our meta-analysis was that garlic reduced TC concentrations modestly with little impact on the LDL and HDL component of TC.This is supported by a qualitative analysis that we conducted which was limited to the four trials that provided TC, LDL, HDL and TAG concentration data.The results of several subgroup and sensitivity analyses warrant discussion.The TAG levels were only reduced by 0·03 mmol/l with dietary control relative to placebo (although not significantly) compared with reductions of 0·18 mmol/l in studies without diet control. .

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