Garlic is part of the Allium genus, which also includes onions, shallots, leeks, and chives.Some of the other members of this genus share certain health properties with garlic { Encyclopedia Britannica: "Allium."}.The Bible and Qur’an mention it, and while the plant is native to Central Asia, cloves dating back more than 3000 years were found in King Tut’s tomb.While garlic’s effects are comparable to standard blood-pressure drugs, it has been found that people who have inadequate levels of vitamin B may not experience this benefit. .

11 Proven Health Benefits of Garlic

He prescribed garlic to treat a variety of medical conditions — and modern science has confirmed many of these beneficial health effects.Garlic grows in many parts of the world and is a popular ingredient in cooking, due to its strong smell and delicious taste.Its use was well documented by many major civilizations, including the Egyptians, Babylonians, Greeks, Romans, and Chinese ( 1 ).Other compounds that may play a role in garlic’s health benefits include diallyl disulfide and s-allyl cysteine ( 3 ).Summary Garlic is a plant in the onion family that’s grown for its distinctive taste and health benefits.A large, 12-week study found that a daily garlic supplement reduced the number of colds by 63% compared with a placebo ( 5 ).Summary Garlic supplements may help prevent and reduce the severity of illnesses like the flu and common cold, but more research needs to be done before any conclusions can be made.The active compounds in garlic can reduce blood pressure Cardiovascular diseases like heart attack and stroke are responsible for more deaths than almost any other condition ( 8 ).In one study, 600–1,500 mg of aged garlic extract were just as effective as the drug Atenolol at reducing blood pressure over a 24-week period ( 12 ).Garlic contains antioxidants that may help prevent Alzheimer’s disease and dementia Oxidative damage from free radicals contributes to the aging process.But given the beneficial effects on important risk factors like blood pressure, it makes sense that garlic could help you live longer.The fact that it can fight infectious diseases is also an important factor, because these are common causes of death, especially in the elderly or people with dysfunctional immune systems ( 23 ).Summary Garlic has known beneficial effects on common causes of chronic disease, so it makes sense that it could also help you live longer.It was traditionally used in ancient cultures to reduce fatigue and improve the work capacity of laborers.Summary Garlic may improve physical performance in lab animals and people with heart disease.Summary Garlic was shown to significantly reduce lead toxicity and related symptoms in one study.However, rodent studies have shown that it can minimize bone loss by increasing estrogen in females ( 27 , 28 , 29 , 30 ).Summary Garlic appears to have some benefits for bone health by increasing estrogen levels in females, but more human studies are needed.Garlic is easy to include in your diet and adds flavor The last one is not a health benefit but is still important. .

6 Garlic Benefits To Boost Your Health – Cleveland Clinic

Dietitian Laura Jeffers, MEd, RD, LD, offers six surprising ways that this herb-like vegetable boosts your health.“Garlic gets its pungent smell from an organic sulfur compound called allicin,” Jeffers says.According to one study involving 41,000 women between the ages of 55 and 69, those who routinely ate garlic, fruits and vegetables had a 35% lower colon cancer risk.Researchers believe red blood cells turn the sulfur in garlic into hydrogen sulfide gas.Before putting your blood pressure medication away, though, consult your doctor to see if adding more garlic to your diet could be beneficial for you.Those same antibacterial properties in fresh garlic can kill the bacteria that lead to food poisoning, including salmonella and E.coli.The enzymes from the allicin need a few minutes to start working, so let it sit after you mince, crush or chop it.Higher temperatures kill the allicin, so add garlic to your recipes when you’re almost done cooking.”.On rare occasions, garlic supplements can cause headaches, fatigue, appetite loss, muscle aches, dizziness and allergic reactions like asthma attacks or skin rashes.“You may also get a stinging feeling on the skin if you handle significant amounts of fresh and dried garlic,” says Jeffers.Overdoing it can cause discomfort, including upset stomach, bloating, diarrhea, body odor and bad breath. .

7 Impressive Benefits of Garlic

Indeed, “in many studies, the concentrated equivalent may be around two cloves,” says Wendy Bazilian, RDN, a doctor of public health and nutritionist in San Diego and author of the Eat Clean, Stay Lean book series.But don’t discount the power of adding garlic to your favorite foods, which can contain a huge variety of nutrients and chemicals that may interact synergistically together in beneficial ways, says Raj.Don’t be afraid to load up the garlic in hummus, pesto, pasta, sauces, soups, stir-fries, and roasted vegetables, says Dr. Bazilian.“Garlic stimulates the synthesis of nitric oxide, which dilates blood vessels, and inhibits ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) activity,” says Raj.Given our collective zest for learning about taking care of our immune system during the COVID-19 pandemic, here’s one reason to add garlic to your dinner tonight.While there’s not enough evidence to suggest that that garlic will prevent or treat the common cold, for instance, it can play a role in your body’s defense mechanisms in a few ways.Scientists also believe that garlic has antiviral properties that may work in two ways, she says: by blocking the entry of viruses into cells, and by strengthening the immune response so that it can effectively fight off potential invaders.The National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute recommends following a heart-healthy eating plan, getting plenty of exercise, managing your weight, and avoiding or quitting smoking.Adding flavor through garlic can also potentially help you reduce the need for excess salt on your foods — and for just 4 calories per clove, according to the U.S.

Department of Agriculture.And finally, don’t discount the role that taste plays in your overall diet: “When we love the food we eat and learn to listen to our cues for satiety, it can be more satisfying, too,” Bazilian says. .

Garlic: Proven health benefits and uses

According to experts at Kew Gardens, England’s royal botanical center of excellence, the people of ancient India valued the therapeutic properties of garlic and also thought it to be an aphrodisiac.The original Olympic athletes in Ancient Greece were given garlic – possibly the earliest example of “performance enhancing” agents used in sports.A study published in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology warned that short-term heating reduces the anti-inflammatory effects of fresh raw garlic extracts.Co-author, Ray Swapan, Ph.D., said “This research highlights the great promise of plant-originated compounds as natural medicine for controlling the malignant growth of human brain tumor cells.Women whose diets were rich in allium vegetables had lower levels of osteoarthritis , a team at King’s College London and the University of East Anglia, both in England, reported in the journal BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders.The study authors said their findings not only highlighted the possible impact of diet on osteoarthritis outcomes but also demonstrated the potential for using compounds that exist in garlic to develop treatments for the condition.The long-term study, involving more than 1,000 healthy female twins, found that those whose dietary habits included plenty of fruit and vegetables, “particularly alliums such as garlic,” had fewer signs of early osteoarthritis in the hip joint.Diallyl sulfide, a compound in garlic, was 100 times more effective than two popular antibiotics in fighting the Campylobacter bacterium, according to a study published in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.Senior author, Dr. Xiaonan Lu, from Washington State University, said, “This work is very exciting to me because it shows that this compound has the potential to reduce disease-causing bacteria in the environment and in our food supply.”.Because of this, the scientists decided to focus on diallyl trisulfide, a garlic oil component, as a safer way to deliver the benefits of hydrogen sulfide to the heart.In another study, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists found that garlic oil may help protect diabetes patients from cardiomyopathy.The study authors wrote, “In conclusion, garlic oil possesses significant potential for protecting hearts from diabetes-induced cardiomyopathy.”.Doctors at the Department of Urology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, China, carried out a study evaluating the relationship between Allium vegetable consumption and prostate cancer risk.Scientists at the Institute of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Shandong University, China, wanted to determine whether diallyl disulfide (DADS), a garlic-derived organosulfur compound, might have protective effects against ethanol-induced oxidative stress.Scientists at the Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, studied what impact foods might have on antimicrobial infections and preterm delivery risk.Ronny Myhre and colleagues concentrated on the effects of Alliums and dried fruits, because a literature search had identified these two foods as showing the greatest promise for reducing preterm delivery risk.The team investigated the intake of dried fruit and Alliums among 18,888 women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort, of whom 5 percent (950) underwent spontaneous PTD (preterm delivery).The study authors concluded, “Intake of food with antimicrobial and prebiotic compounds may be of importance to reduce the risk of spontaneous PTD.

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The Top 8 Health Benefits of Garlic

For thousands of years, before this spice was used to flavor your favorite dishes, it was employed as a medical treatment in ancient cultures.Garlic consumption has been shown to have numerous fantastic health benefits for the body.Though it was not widely known, experts now understand that sulfur compounds in garlic are the primary cause of its beneficial effects on health.By slicing, chopping, or crushing garlic bulbs, the thio-Sulfinite chemicals in them are converted into allicin.Your body’s immunity is what keeps it from getting sick in the first place, and it also aids in the fight against illness when the situation calls for it.Garlic offers an immune system boost to help prevent colds and the flu virus.In some households around the world, families hang garlic cloves on a string around their childrens’ necks to help them with congestion.Because they are among the significant causes of death, addressing one of their primary causes, high blood pressure, is extremely important.Garlic is a fantastic spice to include in your diet for those suffering from high blood pressure or hypertension.Keep in mind that you must make sure that the amount of these supplements you take is the same as four cloves of garlic each day.According to research, consuming fresh garlic can help lessen the risk of colon cancer.Allicin is a bioactive antibiotic that can help fight infections and bacteria in sliced, squashed, or diced cloves.Garlic has high antioxidants, which help prevent any oxidative damage from occurring in your body.Garlic was used in the olden days to alleviate weariness and boost laborers’ working hours and endurance.Ultimately, eating garlic plays an excellent role in minimizing, even if subtly, how soon you get weary when physically exerting yourself.We are exposed to a wide range of chemicals and compounds daily while living in the world today.Garlic is a powerful detox food that promotes glutathione production by various liver enzymes.It also provides other important detoxifying components, including multiple bioactive selenium and sulfur compounds.Now that we have discussed the health benefits of garlic, whether raw or taken as a supplement, you can take the first step to a healthier, better you.Then contact us whether you prefer conveniently minced garlic, easy-to-use peeled cloves or whole bulbs. .

Can Dogs Eat Garlic? We've Got the Answer — American Kennel Club

According to the Merck Veterinary Manual, garlic and other members of the allium family, including onions, contain thiosulfate, which is toxic to dogs but not to humans.Symptoms of anemia include pale mucous membranes, rapid breathing, lethargy, weakness, jaundice, and dark colored urine.Garlic toxicity also causes symptoms of gastrointestinal upset, including vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, abdominal pain, depression, and dehydration.Studies have found it takes approximately 15 to 30 grams of garlic per kilograms of body weight to produce harmful changes in a dog’s blood.To put that into perspective, the average clove of supermarket garlic weighs between 3 and 7 grams, so your dog would have to eat a lot to get really sick.If you want to give your dog a healthy treat, consider feeding him fruits and vegetables that are high in valuable nutrients, like apples, blueberries, strawberries, watermelon, carrots, cucumbers, and sweet potatoes. .

4 Reasons Eating Garlic is Good for Cancer Prevention

Whether you already enjoy garlic or are wary of its intense scent, here are four reasons to regularly spice up your meals with this root veggie.After a review of the global research, AICR’s reports found that eating garlic frequently lowers the risk of colorectal cancers.You’ll be packing in numerous phytochemicals, many studied for their role in lowering risk of many cancers.– S-allyl cysteine: A water-soluble sulfur compound found in high doses in aged garlic extract.This vegetable is a staple seasoning in many Asian, Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines that incorporate many other spices and herbs for flavor.Garlic belongs to the Allium family of vegetables, which includes onions, scallions, shallots, leeks and chives.It’s your pattern of eating that counts – choosing mostly plant foods that fill up two-thirds or more of your plate, with smaller amounts of meat. .

Garlic Mustard: Invasive, Destructive, Edible

Garlic mustard, originally from Europe and Asia, has become a very troublesome invasive plant across the Northeast, Midwest and Northwest of the United States. .

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