Naturally occurring sulfur in the garlic interacts with those enzymes, occasionally turning it slightly green or blue.Shifts in temperature, pH, and the age of the garlic can also come into play, so heating it or mixing it with acid might have some affect.Anytime you cook garlic or onions in a high-acid solution—say you sauté them, then deglaze the pan with lemon juice—this issue could occur.LaBorde also suggests blanching: "Try putting them in hot water for a short period of time, which might slow down or inactivate the enzymes.". .

Why Does Garlic Turn Blue and Is It Safe to Eat?

This garlic turned blue in the home kitchen during a pickling process.The Blue Garlic Surprise.Perhaps you, as I, have been cooking with garlic for years, expecting garlic to remain a kind of off-white, uninteresting color throughout the cooking process.If one day your garlic turns a shocking shade of blue, making your homemade pickles, pork roast, or pot of cabbage and kielbasa look strange and even poisonous, be assured that no matter how strange it looks, it hurts only your eyes, not your body.My Blue Garlic Experience.An hour before the pot was to finish, I added the pressed garlic and sliced kielbasa and folded them in.Never in my cooking life had garlic turned blue-green, but never had I cooked my family’s original kielbasa and cabbage dish with sauerkraut, either.Garlic Turning Blue Is Sometimes Called "Greening".If you would like more in-depth information on the chemistry behind garlic turning blue, read the excellent article written by The New York Times columnist Harold McGee, When Science Sniffs around the Kitchen.How Does Garlic Turn Blue?Studies prompted by the food industry as a result of increasingly occurring batches of accidentally colored garlic have begun to unlock the mystery of why garlic turns blue.These studies have found a number of complicated chemical processes responsible for garlic turning shades of blue, green, and even pink under certain conditions.Added presence of acid: It seems clear that the presence of acids such as lemon juice or vinegar can cause a color change, although not always.It seems clear that the presence of acids such as lemon juice or vinegar can cause a color change, although not always.Temperature: Garlic that is pre-heated may or may not react with acid to change color.Garlic that is pre-heated may or may not react with acid to change color.Color of garlic bulbs: Some garlic is pure white, some has tinges of purple or red; the colored garlic may be more prone to turning blue-green.Some garlic is pure white, some has tinges of purple or red; the colored garlic may be more prone to turning blue-green.If the Chinese can perfect this color change in garlic, why do we have only “accidents”?Until more research is completed, here’s some helpful information to have when your garlic turns blue in your kitchen:.If someone does happen to ask why there are bright blue-green flecks of color in the dish, take them aside and tell them your secret and that you expect them to keep it: “The dish needed some color.”.For some reason I decided to add some lemon juice as a preservative and immediately it turned bluish green.It’s like adding poison with garlic taste to your food.I started noticing the garlic turning into a light blue copper sulfate-like colour after 2hrs.I bought 5-6 heads of garlic from the grocery store and used a food processor to puree the garlic with some olive oil.I kept it in the fridge for a week and noticed the turquoise color on the bottom of the jar.Nothing happened to the garlic in the small jar.I think it has to do with the garlic itself.I had placed hot peppers and a few pieces of garlic in vinegar added little ginger and noticed that the garlic turned bluish green.Not wanting to throw away an expensive piece of fish, after some quick web-searching, I decided it was safe to eat.I'm in my 50's and never saw or heard of garlic turning blue/green.The other day however, I canned some pickled carrots for the first time that included sliced garlic.She added lemon.It first turned pink, and then blue and then Dark blue green.(I have made many jars of chutneys and this has never occurred).I soon realized It was the garlic, I was convinced It was Ok as It tasted great and all natural trusted ingredients (not the culinary zombie apocalypse) but got on the Google anyway and saw all the results for copper-sulphate-garlic!i have been cooking for 50 years and yesterday made a lemon garlic chicken that i have made a hundred times.this has never happened to me in all my years of cooking.I have just read your article regarding the blue Color Change in garlic and would be very interested in the literature references you mentioned throughout the article.Recently pealed some garlic cloves, i put them in a glass jar and covered with ACV......and to my surprise they turned a light turquoise color.....glad to know they are safe, thanks for the post.But i thank you for sharing this info 'cause now i feel safer to consume this drink knowing that it' s normal for garlic to change it's "stripes".I had the experience of my diced garlic, with lemon and vinegar, turning beautifully blue.But it made for an interesting fridge find!I had placed hot peppers and a few pieces of garlic in vinegar and noticed that the garlic turned bluish green.What made it turn?Copper, Aluminum, Onion, lemon, vinegar?Garlic is frequently with acids so that can't be it... A lot of times the chefs put the garlic in the oven alone - is this why?I thought it must have been color that came out of a bell pepper but this hasn't happened in 50 yrs of making the same recipe.I encountered this phenomenon yesterday for the first time (in my 70+ years of life on this earth) when I made my third jar of refrigerator-marinated mushrooms using white buttons, white vinegar, virgin olive oil, Italian spices, pickling salt, hot pepper flakes, and crushed garlic cloves.All looked perfectly normal but I thought the cut ends smelled a bit "off.".A few hours later when I went to shake up the jar, I was horrified to see the garlic cloves had turned cyanotic and I couldn't help but wonder if the head had been "treated" with something while growing.I decided I might have to toss the mess out and start over, but I'd first check online to find out if anyone else had had this happen--and I'm very pleased to have been shown to this page!Is there anything that can be added to ground garlic to prevent it from turning blue.Garlic cloves were got peeled and were found to be sprouting and preserved by adding apple vinegar.After gap of 5 days, it has been noticed that the color has turned blue.....

never imagined that food turned blue remain edible .......interesting!I freaked out for a second, then investigated the smell, which was good (actually surprisingly pleasant, being this was the first time I’d smelled it), then looked closer at the garlic and saw there was no mold “hair” on the cloves.I then immediately put it in the fridge and searched until I found this post.I made a garlic and ginger paste, but forgot to store in the fridge.I googled and found it is ok and safe to cook.It turns green even in fridge.Crystal T. on December 01, 2017:.I was making tea with fresh garlic, fresh ginger and lemons.I put it in the oven to toast, but it was set to bake, not broil, so it never got really browned on top.Happened to me when I had the idea to put garlic in cider vinegar.I chopped up a heap of garlic all bought from the same store to put into a jar so its easier to use, took me over an hour to chop up, when I went to the fridge the next day the whole jar was blue!This happened to me for the first time when making garlic dill pickles.Just cooked a pickled pork with vinegar, water, peppercorns etc and the garlic turned aqua.Two nights ago making a lemon garlic sauce for an asparagus pasta dish and when I added the lemon the garlic turned a tourqois color.From this article a few things could have caused it... 1) new garlic, 2) lemon juice 3) copper pot...

very interesting!Diego on March 09, 2017:.10 years i've been cooking i've never had garlic turn blue on me until today.Must have been lemon juice, but wait, I've made that dish many times in my life!Must be some other reason like the freshness of either the garlic, lemon, or butter and how it all combined.I searched the internet and read one comment that it could be due to fertilizers and pesticides that have copper.We just pickled several large jars of garlic over the holiday using an apple cider vinegar/lemon juice recipe, and this color change occurred!My grandmother fried peppers in oil, put them in a canning jar, added a sliced clove or two of garlic and covered all with vinegar.Very often the garlic has turned blue - did it again this year when I fixed the peppers!I have never heard or seen anything like this before, I made homemade garlic bread and grated the garlic clove on top of my butter bread, when I took bread out of oven I was shocked to see my bread was a bright greenish looked moldy so after reading these helpful comments I knew I coyld still eat it, but I just couldn't do and I believe I had to much on it, I did take one bite i do believe the sight of it made me not like it.I made two jars of apple cider vinegar and garlic with the same garlic and same vinegar, one turned blue and the other stayed white...I came back and put the container in the fridge and it started going blue!Yes, I have had bright green garlic color change happen.When I went to rotate them the 3rd time an entire tray had turned bright green, the color of poison so I thought it had gone bad due to new condistion (high humidity, and the dehydration process) so I threw out all the green tinted.I always throw away when garlic turns color, but this is news to me.Interesting, first time I have heard of garlic going green, hope it never happens to me, but if it does I won't be throwing it out now I know.They are White for about a week, then you notice they are changing colors until they become a nice Blue.Glad it is safe to eat.This morning, we almost throw everything away because it turned green.I cook garlic with some of my food.I glad that I was eating a lot of garlic.This happened to me soon after I moved out and started cooking for myself.I had loved experimenting with complicated and new recipes and had had good success.I think we ate the dish, but I was nervous til I knew there was no food poisoning.I use lots of garlic never had that problem mine is okra it seem to turn purplish grey when added to my veg soup could it be spices that clashes with okra it stay pretty and green until I add it to soup I guess I just have to play with it and see its so strange.My garlic and shallots turned green last night as I made a lemon butter sauce.Yesterday, wen the paste got over, I thought of making it fresh.Just the garlic paste n not ginger.. That was the first time it happened to me.I have cooked with garlic for years and never knew it could turn turquoise.I would love to see it turn this beautiful color (especially since it's safe to eat that way).I cook with garlic all the time and have never had this happen.I am fascinated by this and would love to make it happen.I pressed a whole glove between two spoons and dropped it in...within 24 hours I thought I was seeing things...

a beautiful turquoise clove of garlic... thanks to your article I will know I can safely continue my healthy remedy.it's not blue garlic, it should be green, and you can follow this article to learn how to make this kind of unspicy green garlic.First time blue garlic experience happened today.I wish to thank you for your informative explanation and for sharing your experience.I chopped up about 6/8 heads of garlic, minced it with sea salt and olive oil and vinegar ( small amount of vinegar more as a preservative than for flavor) , next day opened the fridge to a pastel blue minced garlic, immediately went online searching and found several sites covering the subject, yup, it is safe to eat.June on November 12, 2014:.First time this has happened to me.It was all completely safe..

Glad I had this experience :D.Like so many others commented, I have had garlic turn blue, too!I canned a lot of garlic about a year ago, and many of the bulbs have turned blue.But found out it is okay and safe to eat.I have never seen garlic turn blue!I'm glad you made this Hub so I know what it is.I cook with garlic daily, and I have never had this happen.Even so, I cooked it (a recipe I'd made many times before, without any alteration but the Chinese garlic), and it turned turquoise.Or is it just a coincidence that the first time I made the dish with this garlic was also the first time it turned turquoise?Garlic turns blue every time.Within 48 hours, the garlic started to turn a pretty shade of blue.This start happening about 10 years back. .

Why Does My Garlic Turn Green?

"Why does garlic turn green, and how does it affect flavor?".Turns out that the reactions that create this blue pigment are related to the reactions that create the familiar pungent aroma of garlic and onions.The chemical precursors of these compounds start out safely locked away within individual cells in the plant, but as you cut or grate them, they get exposed to each other, where they end up reacting, with the aid of anzymes.So why does some garlic turn green and others not?Since the colored compounds are created from the same chemical precursors as aromatic compounds, your perception that garlic that turns green has a stronger flavor than garlic that stays white is spot on.So how can you prevent the greenness (and resulting strong flavor) from occurring if you prefer your garlic milder?If you are working on a recipe that includes both acid and garlic, give the garlic a chance to cook down a bit before adding the acid in order to deactivate its enzymes. .

Why Does Garlic Turn Blue When Pickled?

The science behind this effect is related to the same things that give garlic its signature odor and taste.When you cut or crush the garlic, the alliin and alliinase are mixed, creating an organosulphate compound called allicin.A similar color-forming reaction can occur when the garlic is in contact with minerals from certain metals, including copper, aluminum, iron, and tin.In China, garlic is deliberately pickled in such a way that it turns a jade-green and is consumed during the Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival.Use stainless steel or enameled cookware and utensils; avoid copper, aluminum, cast iron, and tin.Blanch the garlic briefly (about 10 seconds or so); this may or may not prevent coloring and can affect the taste, so try this judiciously. .

Why Does Garlic Turn Green or Blue?

While it may seem your garlic has fallen prey to a type of botched science experiment typically reserved for comic-book characters, there’s a perfectly reasonable chemical reaction at play.“The chemical precursors of these compounds start out safely locked away within individual cells in the plant,” writes The Food Lab author Kenji López-Alt in an article on Serious Eats .The acid is “effective at breaching internal membranes and mixing the cell chemicals that react together to create the green pigment,” McGee writes.Essentially, garlic’s color change comes down to temperature, or, as food scientist Dr. Luke LaBorde of Penn State University explains in Epicurious, a shift in pH.

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Why Acid Turns Garlic Blue

The compound responsible for this reaction, isoalliin, is formed when garlic is stored at a cool temperature for several weeks, typically in the winter, when pantries are colder. .

Why Does Garlic Turn Green or Blue?

While it may seem your garlic has fallen prey to a type of botched science experiment typically reserved for comic-book characters, there’s a perfectly reasonable chemical reaction at play.“The chemical precursors of these compounds start out safely locked away within individual cells in the plant,” writes The Food Lab author Kenji López-Alt in an article on Serious Eats.The acid is “effective at breaching internal membranes and mixing the cell chemicals that react together to create the green pigment,” McGee writes.Essentially, garlic’s color change comes down to temperature, or, as food scientist Dr. Luke LaBorde of Penn State University explains in Epicurious, a shift in pH. .

6 Reasons Why Your Ginger Garlic Paste Turns Green

Why Does Ginger Garlic Paste Turns Green?The excess water content will always promote bacterial growth, which often results in color transformations or similar issues.Also, there is no way to fix this issue if you have already used such pieces for the preparations.As mentioned in the first point above, water content or moisture is the leading cause of turning your paste green or blue.You Do Not Use Airtight Container To Store The Paste.If you use any other storage container, you will probably have to face various issues, including the color transformation.In the next section, I have shared a few useful tips to prevent green color from your Ginger Garlic paste.5 Tips To Prevent Ginger Garlic Paste From Turning Green.Hence, if you are looking for a quick fix for this issue, I’d suggest using oil instead of water while grinding the Ginger and Garlic pieces.So, you can also use a bit of salt while preparing the Ginger Garlic paste at home.And most importantly, it will prevent your paste from turning green.Although you won’t see many people using Turmeric powder in their pastes, you can think of using it for this preparation.If you don’t store it well, you are going to face some issues with it.The other thing you can do to prevent it from turning green is to use it when it’s fresh.When you use dry ginger and garlic pieces, it helps in removing excess moisture from the preparation.Should I Use Ginger Garlic Paste That Has Turned Green?Well, I’d not recommend you to use such paste for other food preparations.The color transformation is a good indication that the paste has turned bad.So, throw it away and prepare a fresh batch of paste for your curries or any other preparations.Always remember, the paste should smell fresh whenever you remove it from the container.Therefore, when you put the garlic in your vinegar-based pickles, it tends to change its color to green or blue.How To Preserve Ginger Garlic Paste Without Refrigerator?Still, the shelf life of such paste won’t be as good as the one you store inside the refrigerator.The best way to preserve Ginger Garlic paste is to store it in the freezer.Also, as I’ve mentioned in the guide earlier, you can avoid using a lot of water in your paste.Apart from that, you can also use spices, salt, and other such ingredients that help in the preservation process.Like any other food ingredient, the Ginger Garlic paste is a perishable item.So, as I have mentioned several times in this guide, always use fresh paste for your preparation.And don’t forget to share this guide with your friends and family. .

Why Does Garlic Turn Blue?

Garlic cloves are generally creamy white or yellow in color, but sometimes during the preparation of a meal that creamy white garlic can turn an unappetizing color of blue (or even green) — and it's definitely a bit unsettling.Garlic contains sulfur compounds (that help give it that distinct, garlicky taste) that can react with copper.But even if your garlic does turning a shocking shade of blue next time you're making dinner, you now know you can chow down without hesitation. .

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