This plant is grown as a food crop because of its large, edible, and dark green leaves.These greens have been eaten for the past 2000 years as the ancient Greeks had cultivated various types of collard (like Kale). .

Collard greens: Benefits, nutrition, diet, and risks

The cruciferous family includes bok choy, kale , broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, rutabaga, and turnips.A diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables appears to help reduce the risk of many lifestyle-related health conditions.A high intake of plant foods, such as collard greens, appears to decrease the risk of a number of health conditions, including obesity and overall mortality, diabetes, and heart disease.The findings suggested that consuming cruciferous vegetables may lower the risk of breast cancer, especially in women who have not yet reached menopause.Results of a study published in 2014 suggest that a high intake of fiber might reduce inflammation and glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes.It may help people with type 2 diabetes to achieve better levels of blood sugar, lipids, and insulin.Studies suggest that alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) can lower glucose levels, increase insulin sensitivity, and prevent changes related to oxidative stress in people with diabetes.Excessively high doses of ALA appear to produce adverse effects similar to those caused by too little.While “normal” amounts can help prevent oxidative stress, high levels may lead to cell damage.Researchers have found that consuming collard greens improved liver function in rats with high blood pressure.Vitamin C enables the body to build and maintain levels of collagen, which provides structure to skin and hair.Choline also helps to maintain the structure of cellular membranes, the transmission of nerve impulses, the absorption of fat, and the reduction of chronic inflammation.Folate, also present in choline, may help with depression, as it can prevent an excess of homocysteine from forming in the body. .

What are spring greens called in America?

The distinct flavors of leafy spring greens such as arugula, sorrel, watercress, and others can be an invigorating treat for the winter-weary palate.Most spring greens are tender enough to use uncooked or very lightly steamed—all the better to showcase their clean, fresh flavors.Spring greens do not have the hard core which is found in the middle of fully-grown cabbages. .

Quick Collard Greens Recipe

I’ve put cooked kale in my mashed potatoes, and now I’m sautéing collard greens for every dinner.They’re the perfect quick and healthy side dish, and they’re exactly what I’m craving as we get a taste of spring weather.I cooked these collards greens in the Brazilian style—quickly in hot oil, with some garlic and chili flakes.In Brazil, these collards frequently accompany the national dish, called “feijoada,” which is a rich black bean stew cooked with pork, and rice on the side.If you’re vegetarian or vegan, take note that these collard greens would go great with black beans and rice.Now that our brief history lesson is complete, want to learn how to make this delicious side dish?Cut the thick central ribs out of the collard greens, and stack the leaves on top of one another.I suggest adding the garlic at this point, rather than before, because otherwise it’ll burn by the time your collards are done.As I mentioned, these collard greens go great with cooked black beans and rice.For an Asian spin, you can simply reduce the salt (we’re adding salty sauce later) and substitute 1/2 teaspoon grated ginger for the garlic. .

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