The most common type of kale is called curly kale or Scots kale, which has green and curly leaves and a hard, fibrous stem.Vitamin A: 206% of the DV (from beta-carotene).This is coming with a total of 33 calories, 6 grams of carbs (2 of which are fiber) and 3 grams of protein.Given its incredibly low calorie content, kale is among the most nutrient-dense foods in existence. .

Kale: Health benefits, nutrition, diet, and risks

Possible benefits include helping manage blood pressure , boosting digestive health, and protecting against cancer and type 2 diabetes .It may offer a range of health benefits for the whole body.Kale contains fiber, antioxidants, calcium, vitamins C and K, iron, and a wide range of other nutrients that can help prevent various health problems.The American Diabetes Association recommend consuming foods that are rich in vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidants.Fiber: A 2018 study concluded that people who consume the highest amounts of dietary fiber appear to have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes.This, say the AHA, can reduce the risk of high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.Fiber: A Cochrane review from 2016 found a link between consuming fiber and a lower blood lipid (fat) levels and blood pressure.Fiber: A high consumption of fiber may help reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, according to a study from 2015.Bone health.The body uses vitamin C to build and maintain collagen, a protein that provides structure for skin, hair, and bones.Vitamin C is also present in kale.Which other foods can boost hair growth? .

Kale Juice

Many of the minerals found in kale juice can protect against type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure.In addition to strengthen the body's immune system, kale juice can also do wonders to your outer body and your bones.Improve Your Hair, Skin, and Nails.Kale juice has Vitamin K and calcium which are responsible for bone density and health.By drinking kale juice, you can keep your bones and teeth healthy, and reduce your risk of osteoporosis as you age.People who drink kale juice have a much lower risk of macular degeneration and cataracts, two very common eye disorders.Kale juice is very low in calories, so you can enjoy the health benefits of eating kale without the concern about calories.Juice It Up!There's even a kids Ever Green smoothie that includes kale along with some great tasting fruits.The Ever Green smoothie (for all ages, but kids love it the most).It is important to note that you can add kale or spinach to any raw juice drink, smoothie, or fruit bowl to make it green, and get all the nutritious benefits of the kale or spinach at the same time.and experience the wide varieties of ways you can get kale infused into your refreshing raw juice, smoothie, or fruit bowl. .

Hold the Kale! Juicing May Be Bad for Your Health

Grapefruit juice, for instance, can interact with certain drugs that lower cholesterol, like Lipitor (atorvastatin); medication that lowers blood pressure, like Procardia (nifedipine); corticosteroids like Entocort (budesonide); and antihistamines like Allegra (fexofednadine), says the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).In addition, as the Cleveland Clinic points out, consuming too much vitamin K at one time can counteract blood thinners like warfarin.That said, a study published in March 2016 in the journal Medicine concluded that there’s no evidence to suggest you should forgo vitamin K–rich foods while taking these meds.For instance, before starting to drink green juice daily, talk to your doctor to see if you’re on the correct dose of medication or if any necessary adjustments need to be made.On the other hand, switching out a glass of juice with a naturally calorie-free beverage, like water, black coffee, or tea, decreased that risk by up to 10 percent.If you’ve been told you have type 2 diabetes, eat whole fruit in moderation instead of drinking juice, advises Carol Koprowski, PhD, RD, assistant professor of clinical research in preventive medicine at Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.For fruit, fresh, frozen, or canned varieties without added sugars are all great options, says the American Diabetes Association.Fruits and veggies are naturally rich sources of potassium, which is usually a good thing — the mineral plays a key role in blood pressure regulation, according to the American Heart Association.If you have chronic kidney disease (CKD), that function doesn’t work as well, and potassium can build up in your blood.As such, you’ll have to limit your potassium intake, as too much of the mineral can cause dangerous side effects, including an irregular heartbeat or heart attack, according to the National Kidney Foundation (NKF).For anyone who has CKD and has experienced weakness, numbness, or tingling — signs of potassium overload — call your doctor immediately, advises Judy D. Simon, RD, a clinical dietitian at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle.While cold-pressed juice might taste the freshest, it’s not pasteurized, and it may increase the risk of food poisoning, the FDA warns.Typically, people with healthy immune systems are fine, but those who are compromised, such as pregnant women, children, and older adults, are at a greater risk.Compared with homemade or ready-to-made varieties, pre-bottled cold-pressed juice poses a bigger risk for food poisoning because microbes have more time to multiply.Yet if you’re making your own juice at home, you still need to take proper food safety measures, including washing your hands and the produce during prep, to reduce the risk of illness, says Kelly Johnston, RDN, a health coach with Parsley Health in New York City.Furthermore, a juice alone won’t deliver the nutrients needed to stabilize your blood sugar and give you the sustaining energy necessary to make it through the day, she adds.The addition of fat slows digestion, enhancing satiation, while protein helps balance your blood sugar.That’s because juice removes the pulp — or fiber — necessary to keep your colon in good working order, reduce heart disease risk, lower cholesterol, and help improve blood sugar levels if you have diabetes.Eating them can cause a spike in blood sugar that subsequently takes a dive, resulting in an energy dip, says Johnston.The macronutrient preserves and builds lean body mass, which helps keep you healthy and even burns calories, Youdim explains.In that event, use lemon and ginger to add a hint of sweetness to green juice — but try to avoid larger amounts of fruit, which are higher in calories and sugar compared with veggies.Bottom line: “If you want to live a healthy life and prevent chronic diseases without spending a fortune, eat whole vegetables and grains, not ‘detox’ [products],” says Youdim.

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Benefits of Juicing Kale

A close relative of cabbage and Brussels sprouts, kale was first cultivated in the 1700s and gained popularity in the United States in the late 19th century.Fresh kale juice comes packed with nutrients your body needs to produce energy.Juicing kale also yields a beverage rich in vitamin C and calcium, two nutrients essential for bone health.The vitamin A in kale helps you see at night, and it plays a key role in your ability to detect light.A quarter-cup portion of kale juice provides 7,033 international units of vitamin A, which is more than enough to fulfill your recommended daily intake.Each serving of kale juice also provides 5.8 milligrams of lutein and zeaxanthin, or just shy of half the daily intake suggested by the American Optometric Association.Vitamin K controls the function of platelets, helping to ensure that they can aggregate and form blood clots.Blend a quarter cup of kale juice with frozen berries, Greek yogurt, ground flaxseed and nonfat milk for a healthful smoothie.Alternatively, add a serving of kale juice to soup to boost its nutrient content. .

Kale: Nutrition, Types, Cooking, and More

The leaf is tougher than spinach leaves, so it won’t wilt as quickly in the pan.Bake kale in the oven with just a little olive oil drizzled over lightly salted leaves.Store-bought kale chips can sometimes be deep-fried or come with a coating of cheese, so check labels to make sure you’re not reaching for a high-calorie snack. .

The many types, health benefits of kale

It’s popular in northern Europe and now throughout the U.S. During the Middle Ages, kale was planted and used to feed humans and livestock.History books state that Thomas Jefferson experimented with several varieties of kale at his Monticello estate in the early 1800s.Russian kale is harder to find and it has flat fringed leaves that range in color from green to red to purple.Kale is a nutrition superstar due to the amounts of vitamins A, K, B6 and C, calcium, potassium, copper and manganese it contains.Kale is a member of the cruciferous vegetable family along with cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, broccoli, collard greens, kohlrabi, rutabaga, turnips and bok choy.These vegetables offer health benefits, including potentially reducing the risk of various types of cancer.The only people who may need to avoid or limit kale intake are those that form oxalate containing kidney stones or take the blood thinner Coumadin/warfarin.Kale holds its texture well in cooking, and it can be steamed, stir fried, roasted, or eaten raw.Always remove the middle rib as it tends to be overly tough and fibrous and imparts a more bitter taste when eaten.Get some kale, remove the center rib and tear up the leaves, and add them to a regular green salad.Although any variety will work in this dish, curly, dark green dinosaur kale looks spectacular, especially alongside a mix of red, yellow and orange cherry tomatoes.

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Top 5 health benefits of kale

Kale is a cruciferous vegetable, like cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower, and has large, edible leaves with a tough central stem.When you buy kale, you’ll normally find it sold whole or pre-chopped, and it can be eaten raw or lightly cooked.What are the 5 top health benefits of kale?May support bone health.It’s a good source of plant-based calcium, needed for strong bones and teeth, and has low levels of a natural compound called oxalate, which makes the calcium more available for absorption.Kale is also a good source of vitamin K, which studies suggest works with vitamin D to support healthy bone metabolism.Kale contains a number of nutrients that support heart health, including potassium, which maintains a healthy blood pressure.As kale is a rich source of vitamin K, those on anti-coagulant medication (commonly referred to as blood thinners) need to consider the amount they eat.Typically the advice while on this medication is that you should aim to keep your dietary intake approximately the same.Some people with thyroid issues or those on thyroid medication should be mindful about consuming cruciferous vegetables like kale.That said, kale is of lower risk because of its low levels of these goitrogenic compounds.All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other healthcare professional. .

When You Eat Kale Every Day, This Is What Happens To Your Body

When You Eat Kale Every Day, This Is What Happens To Your Body.Given how good for you kale is, should you eat it every day? .

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