If you've hit up a farmer's m ar ket, juice bar, or followed health trends over the past decade, you've probably heard of kale.While kale is a versatile veggie, keeping it fresh can be a bit tricky.While some stores may wash their produce, it’s typically a good idea to rinse it off once you get home.However, it doesn’t have to be completely dry before moving to the next step - just make sure it isn't dripping wet.Most importantly, make sure you keep that kale cool, so store your container in the refrigerator.This might take a little rearranging or cleaning out (good-bye week old leftovers) but by storing it in a cool location, you prevent the kale from becoming bitter.If you’ve got a large amount, you can also layer paper towels and kale to keep those beautiful leaves from going limp. .

How to Store Kale in the Fridge or Freezer

Turns out, kale isn't a fad after all—the leafy green has staying power.Kale is one of the only greens that you can wash and prep days in advance—it's so hardy that it rarely wilt.You can stem, slice or tear the leaves, rinse them, dry them well in a salad spinner or with kitchen towels, and store the leaves, wrapped in a paper towel in a zip-top plastic bag, for up to 3 days.When the water boils, toss in the kale leaves and cook until they brighten in color, 1 to 2 minutes. .

How to Freeze and Store Kale

When you’re storing fresh kale, reduce excess moisture by waiting to rinse the leaves until you’re ready to eat them. .

How To Store Kale To Make It Last Longer

The best thing about Kale is that it is a powerful green that is very inexpensive and can actually be stored for up to a week in your fridge if prepped the right way.So to help you out I am bringing you this complete guide on how to store kale the right way so it lasts at least 5 days, maybe more.Although kale is a very sturdy and hearty green, it can wilt fairly fast if it is not stored properly.That is why it is important to know the proper way to store it so you can enjoy it all week long in healthy Kale Salads, Simple Green Smoothies, Sweet Potato Buddha Bowls and more!Kale is also packed full of fiber and antioxidants, which makes it a great source for lowering cholesterol and fighting disease.Kale is a very sensitive green and will last the longest if you wait to wash it , keep the leaves attached to the stems and store it in the coldest part of your fridge like your crisper drawer.To do this wrap it up loosely in a dry paper towel and store it in a ziplock bag or container and keep it in the refrigerator until you are ready to use it.To do this wrap it up loosely in a dry paper towel and store it in a ziplock bag or container and keep it in the refrigerator until you are ready to use it.You also want to keep in mind that kale is very sensitive to other fruits and veggies so make sure you store it with other greens like spinach, arugula, herbs, cucumber, and celery.4-5 days is good for most people which is why I wrote this post on how to store your kale so it is ready for you to add to your meals right from the refrigerator.Then wrap it up in a dry, loose paper towel and store it in a ziplock plastic bag or airtight container and keep it in your crisper drawer in the refrigerator for up to 4 days!When you are ready to use the kale, remove it from the refrigerator, chop it up and place it into a strainer and rinse it really well under lukewarm water.Roll a bunch of the leaves up and run a clean kitchen knife through it to slice it nice and thin into strips.Take about 2 cups of the sliced kale at a time and place it in the centre of a long pice of clean paper towel and wrap it up loosely. .

How to Prep Kale (cutting, washing, and storing kale)

Here’s your complete guide to prepping this super healthy leafy green, including tips for how to make it taste less bitter!Kale is a ridiculously healthy green vegetable- in fact, it’s one of the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet.And if you follow some tricks and tips for preparing it the right way, you can remove lots of the bitterness and use it in all kinds of different recipes!But if you’re a beginner cook and not as comfortable using a knife, a leaf stripper is a nifty tool that makes removing the stems so easy!Not only is this nifty leaf stripper tool great to remove stems from kale (and chard, and other greens), but it also works with herbs like rosemary and thyme!Find the hold in the leaf stripper that will fit the stem (you may need to trip a particularly thick part off the end first).It probably won’t work as well with a leaf stripper unless you have very large, sturdy leaves.Just fold it in half or stack a few leaves on top of each other and run your chef’s knife over it in both directions, until you get smaller pieces.The cold will help remove some of the bitterness, and this will also help deep clean the leaves (more on that in a sec).Note: This will also help perk the leaves up if they are a bit wilted, a trick that works with all leafy greens, celery, herbs, etc.Note: This will also help perk the leaves up if they are a bit wilted, a trick that works with all leafy greens, celery, herbs, etc.!(By the way, this trick works with other dirty produce, such as leeks or cilantro, as well!).Soak chopped kale in a large bowl or container of ice water.Use a slotted spoon to remove the kale to a colander or salad spinner insert.When stored properly, kale can stay good for a week or more in the fridge after you prep it!Finally, place the kale on top of it and seal it with the lid to make it airtight.The reason why you want the damp paper towel is to increase the humidity within the container.Did you know commenting and rating recipes is one of the best ways you can support your favorite food bloggers? .

How to Best Store Produce (And Save Money In the Process)

We love the nutritional power of fresh produce, but we definitely don’t dig reaching into the fridge to find moldy berries or a wilted bunch of lettuce.Learning how to best store produce in the fridge helps you maximize the freshness and flavour of ingredients, as well as cut down on food waste.Also, having produce batch prepped and ready to go means you’ll reach for carrots and dip as a snack rather than resorting to junk food.One of the first things we teach our students in the Culinary Nutrition Expert Program is how to prep and store produce.As you get your fridge organized and your produce stocked for healthy eating, keep these guidelines in mind to help you preserve the freshness.We’ve included some of the common types of produce people tend to buy here – for a full list you can grab a free download below.Wash before storing by soaking in cold water to remove the dirt, then drain.Cover the greens with a bag and secure with a twist tie or rubber band.You can store them in a mason jar with water (like the greens above) or wrap them in a cloth napkin or paper towel.We like to cut the carrots in different sizes for multiple uses – sticks for munching, coins or cubes for dairy-free soups and stews, and shreds or spirals for salads.You can also freeze ends of celery, carrots onions and other veggies for soup stocks.Store in warmer parts of the fridge: Towards the door and out of the produce bins, which tend to be cooler.Store at room temperature in a dark cool place with good air circulation.Store at room temperature in a dark cool place with good air circulation.We find it helpful to mince a whole bunch of garlic at the beginning of the week to add to dishes.Store in an airtight container in the fridge, with a towel underneath to absorb extra moisture.Some berries, like strawberries and raspberries, can be quite delicate so it’s best to eat them within 1-2 days of buying them.We like to juice a bunch of lemons or limes at the beginning of the week to use in our recipes.You can also freeze citrus juice in small jars or ice cube trays for easy use in recipes and smoothies.The nutrients in these oils are sensitive to heat, light and oxygen, which means you also never want to cook with these.The nutrients in these oils are sensitive to heat, light and oxygen, which means you also never want to cook with these.Grains have loads of magic inside, like essential fats and vitamins, which are sensitive to heat, light and oxygen.The shorter the time and distance from farm to plate, the longer that produce is going to last in your fridge.The shorter the time and distance from farm to plate, the longer that produce is going to last in your fridge.Dirt, residues and shriveled stems or other vegetable bits can influence the freshness of the new stuff.Dirt, residues and shriveled stems or other vegetable bits can influence the freshness of the new stuff.We’re big nerds around here and love seeing photos of organized fridges and pantries, like this one from one of our Culinary Nutrition Expert students. .

How to Store Kale: 12 Steps (with Pictures)

wikiHow's Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article is backed by trusted research and meets our high quality standards.If you want to freeze the kale, blanch it for 2 minutes in boiling water before plunging it into an ice bath. .

How to Store Kale

It's native to the Mediterranean, writes Harold McGee in On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen, with "thick, succulent, waxy leaves and stalks that help make these plants so hardy.".Unlike other salad greens that wilt quickly after the first exposure to excess moisture, kale's sturdiness means it can be washed before being stored. .

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