A plant that would have been first cultivated in the Mediterranean area, it was called in these times cabbage well before the well rounded variety existed.Kale was a significant crop in Roman times; it became a basic staple for peasants in the Middle Ages and it was brought in the United States by the English in the XVII century.Since it resists to cold temperatures and grows easily, kale was for a long time a very appreciated winter vegetable especially in Scotland, Germany, Holland and Scandinavia.Those leaves are not well rounded, a characteristic expressed by the Latin word which describes this variety of cabbage « acephala » and which means « without head ».Kale is delicious coated with sauce, sprinkled with cheese or in purée (alone or with mashed potatoes).We cook kale in water or we steam it from 20 to 30 min, braised in a slow cooker, stuffed or sautéed in a wok.Put the kale leaves very tight rather than loose in refrigerator without washing it, inside a perforated plastic bag. .

What is another word for kale?

From Afrikaans From Albanian From Amharic From Arabic From Armenian From Azerbaijani From Basque From Belarusian From Bengali From Bosnian From Bulgarian From Catalan From Cebuano From Chichewa From Chinese From Corsican From Croatian From Czech From Danish From Dutch From Esperanto From Estonian From Farsi From Filipino From Finnish From French From Frisian From Galician From Georgian From German From Greek From Gujarati From Haitian Creole From Hausa From Hebrew From Hindi From Hmong From Hungarian From Icelandic From Igbo From Indonesian From Irish From Italian From Japanese From Javanese From Kannada From Kazakh From Khmer From Korean From Kurdish From Kyrgyz From Lao From Latin From Latvian From Lithuanian From Luxembourgish From Macedonian From Malagasy From Malay From Malayalam From Maltese From Maori From Marathi From Mongolian From Burmese From Nepali From Norwegian From Polish From Portuguese From Punjabi From Romanian From Russian From Samoan From Scots Gaelic From Serbian From Sesotho From Shona From Sinhala From Slovak From Slovenian From Somali From Spanish From Sundanese From Swahili From Swedish From Tajik From Tamil From Telugu From Thai From Turkish From Ukrainian From Urdu From Uzbek From Vietnamese From Welsh From Xhosa From Yiddish From Yoruba From Zulu.To Afrikaans To Albanian To Amharic To Arabic To Armenian To Azerbaijani To Basque To Belarusian To Bengali To Bosnian To Bulgarian To Catalan To Cebuano To Chichewa To Chinese To Corsican To Croatian To Czech To Danish To Dutch To Esperanto To Estonian To Farsi To Filipino To Finnish To French To Frisian To Galician To Georgian To German To Greek To Gujarati To Haitian Creole To Hausa To Hebrew To Hindi To Hmong To Hungarian To Icelandic To Igbo To Indonesian To Irish To Italian To Japanese To Javanese To Kannada To Kazakh To Khmer To Korean To Kurdish To Kyrgyz To Lao To Latin To Latvian To Lithuanian To Luxembourgish To Macedonian To Malagasy To Malay To Malayalam To Maltese To Maori To Marathi To Mongolian To Burmese To Nepali To Norwegian To Polish To Portuguese To Punjabi To Romanian To Russian To Samoan To Scots Gaelic To Serbian To Sesotho To Shona To Sinhala To Slovak To Slovenian To Somali To Spanish To Sundanese To Swahili To Swedish To Tajik To Tamil To Telugu To Thai To Turkish To Ukrainian To Urdu To Uzbek To Vietnamese To Welsh To Xhosa To Yiddish To Yoruba To Zulu. .

Kale

Kales are considered to be closer to wild cabbage than most of the many domesticated forms of Brassica oleracea.Kale originates from Northern Middle English cale (compare Scots kail and German Kohl) for various cabbages.Kale originated in the eastern Mediterranean and Anatolia, where it was cultivated for food beginning by 2000 BCE at the latest.[5] At the time, kale was widely grown in Croatia mostly because it was easy to grow and inexpensive, and could desalinate soil.[5] For most of the twentieth century, kale was primarily used in the United States for decorative purposes; it became more popular as an edible vegetable in the 1990s due to its nutritional value.During World War II, the cultivation of kale (and other vegetables) in the U.K. was encouraged by the Dig for Victory campaign.[6] The vegetable was easy to grow and provided important nutrients missing from a diet because of rationing.Kale is usually an annual plant grown from seed with a wide range of germination temperatures.Many varieties of kale and cabbage are grown mainly for ornamental leaves that are brilliant white, red, pink, lavender, blue or violet in the interior of the rosette.Raw kale is composed of 84% water, 9% carbohydrates, 4% protein, and 1% fat (table).In a 100 g (3+1⁄2 oz) serving, raw kale provides 207 kilojoules (49 kilocalories) of food energy and a large amount of vitamin K at 3.7 times the Daily Value (DV) (table).Kale is a good source (10–19% DV) of thiamin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, vitamin E and several dietary minerals, including iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus (see table "Kale, raw").Boiling kale decreases the level of glucosinate compounds, whereas steaming, microwaving or stir frying does not cause significant loss.In the Netherlands, a traditional winter dish called "boerenkoolstamppot" is a mix of curly kale and mashed potatoes, sometimes with fried bacon, and served with rookworst ("smoked sausage").In Italy, cavolo nero kale is an ingredient of the Tuscan soup ribollita.A traditional Portuguese soup, caldo verde, combines pureed potatoes, very finely sliced kale, olive oil and salt.[28] Additional ingredients can include broth and sliced, cooked spicy sausage.In Scotland, kale provided such a base for a traditional diet that the word in some Scots dialects is synonymous with food.In Ireland, kale is mixed with mashed potatoes to make the traditional dish colcannon.[32] In Cuthbertson's book Autumn in Kyle and the charm of Cunninghame, he states that Kilmaurs in East Ayrshire was famous for its kale, which was an important foodstuff.The locals agreed, but a gentle roasting on a shovel over a coal fire ensured that the seeds never germinated.

.

The Most Common Types of Kale, Explained

You should be familiar with the most commonly available types of kale, so the next time you're shopping for the stuff you'll know exactly which kind you should pick up for a given recipe.After stripping the leaves from those tough, fibrous stems, it’s great sautéed with a bit of garlic or slow-simmered in oil, and even roasted alongside proteins or other vegetables.The curly edges crisp up beautifully when exposed to the oven's dry heat, and they taste great when cooked in an almost-dry skillet.It's a little bit tough compared to other varieties, so if you're going to eat it raw, it needs to be gently massaged with a bit of salt and acid like lemon juice or vinegar; that said, when treated properly, it lends a delicate, feathery texture to salads, and those crinkly edges make for a dramatic presentation.It has a deeper color and is slightly thinner and more tender than curly kale, making it more versatile—it cooks more quickly and requires less massaging for use in raw preparations. .

36 words for 'kale'

It simply looks through tonnes of dictionary definitions and grabs the ones that most closely match your search query.So this project, Reverse Dictionary, is meant to go hand-in-hand with Related Words to act as a word-finding and brainstorming toolset.The definitions are sourced from the famous and open-source WordNet database, so a huge thanks to the many contributors for creating such an awesome free resource.Special thanks to the contributors of the open-source code that was used in this project: Elastic Search, @HubSpot, WordNet, and @mongodb. .

Kale Emshoff a catcher to watch in Royals' system

Instead, he was dubbed by multiple outlets as one of the top free agents on the first day of post-Draft activity, when teams could contact undrafted players about signing. .

W K T 3 K

Leave a reply

your email address will not be published. required fields are marked *

Name *
Email *
Website