Rabbits in the wild all over the world successfully consume a wide variety of plant material.Various types of dry and fresh grasses and plants with leaves comprise the largest portion of the wild rabbit diet.Rabbits will also eat bark on trees, tender twigs and sprouts, fruits, seeds and other nutritious foods in much small amounts.The majority of the house rabbit diet should be composed of grass hay (any variety).Eating hay promotes healthy teeth and gastrointestinal tract and should be available to your rabbit at all times.Fresh foods are also an important part of your rabbit’s diet and they provide additional nutrients as well as different textures and tastes, which are enriching for your friend as well.Fresh foods also provide more moisture in the diet, which is good for kidney and bladder function.The one most talked about with rabbits is oxalic acid and it is completely harmless to animals or humans when consumed in small amounts.The toxicity of oxalic acid comes with feeding large quantities of foods high in this chemical and can result in tingling of the skin, the mouth and damage to the kidneys over time.Rotating the greens will also give your bunny variety in taste, texture and general nutrition!You may know that dark green leafy vegetables and red peppers have more vitamin C per weight than citrus fruits!Foods that are notorious for causing rabbit GI problems when fed improperly are grains of any kind and legumes (beans, peas, etc).There has also been discussion about feeding vegetables that are goitrogenic in humans (causing a goiter) more notoriously those in the broccoli/cabbage family.One study done on rabbits indicated that it would take several weeks of exclusively feeding huge quantities of these foods to see any abnormalities in the blood.These foods are often higher in starch or sugars and should be fed in lesser amounts than the leafy greens.A good amount of “other” vegetables (non leafy greens) to feed your rabbit would be about 1 tablespoon per 2 lbs of body weight per day in one meal or divided into two or more.You also might choose to hand-feed the fruit portion of the diet as part of developing a close bond with your bunny and also to make sure he has an appetite every day.It is a great way to see if your bunny is feeling good when you observe if he takes his fruit treat every morning!When a plant would produce fruit, it is for a limited time and all the animals in the area would want to gobble these gems up quickly!This means that rabbits cannot limit themselves when given sugary or starchy foods if left to their own devices!Overfeeding fruits can result in a weight gain or GI upset so it is up to you to feed these foods in limited amounts.IMPORTANT: Before introducing any fresh foods to a rabbit it is best if he has been eating grass hay for a minimum of 2 weeks.The grass hay will help to get his GI tract motility and flora in good working order so that he will be able to accept new foods more easily.When introducing new fresh foods to any rabbit’s diet it is best to go slowly to allow the gastrointestinal tract and all its important microorganisms to adjust.All fresh foods regardless of the source should be washed or scrubbed (in the case of hard vegetables) before serving them to your rabbit.These foods should make up about 75% of the fresh portion of your rabbit’s diet (about 1 packed cup per 2 lbs of body weight per day).Others have found that kale fed in large amounts on a daily basis may contribute to bladder sludge and other health issues. .

Plants Rabbits Will Not Eat

They will devour tender shoots in spring and gnaw through bark in the winter.You can tell when rabbits, not deer, have been chewing on your plants because rabbits make clean, 45-degree cuts in young stems and can reach only approximately 3 feet high.Deer can damage plants 6 feet high, and they tear plants when eating so that the stems and leaves are ragged, not cleanly cut like rabbit damage.Rabbits have large incisors, similar to squirrels and mice.But rabbits have two pairs of both upper and lower incisors, while rodents have only one set.Tender, young leaves are the most susceptible, although they will sample many plants in the vegetable garden:.These plants often sustain the most damage, because they are tender and generally out in the open with no protection:.It should be no surprise that plants with a strong fragrance or fuzzy leaves like lavender and black-eyed Susan are less popular with rabbits.Rabbits grazing in your flower beds will simply eat around the less enticing plants.These tend to be either aromatic, thorny, or members of the nightshade family:. .

Can Rabbits Eat Kale?

It is also known as leaf cabbage that belongs to the Brassica Oleracea Acephala group cultivars.Other kinds of vegetables in this group include cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, broccolini, kohlrabi, and Brussels sprouts, and many others.All over the world, kale is a popular choice for health-conscious people who try to incorporate it into their diets in different ways.During that period, they ate almost the same kinds of foods they get to eat now, and their digestive system also evolved in the process.More than 80% of a rabbit's diet is made up of grass, leafy weeds, forbs, and they get much of their essential nutrients through their grazing.Despite the issue of overconsumption of kale, the taste, texture, and nutritional value make it a great choice to diversify their diet.Rabbits also love the taste and texture of kale, so they will be eating a nice healthy meal.In terms of serving, you can feed your rabbit a piece almost the size of its head 2-3 times a week without complications.They can't depend solely on kale because it doesn't have all the vital nutrients rabbits need to grow healthy.That means, after being sure that your rabbit is eating all the nutrients required, you can introduce kale to the diet plan as a supplement.The cooking process takes away the nutrients in the plant, and again, rabbits are already well evolved to handle uncooked food.Make sure you only give a reasonable amount; excess can pose a problem.If you feel like kale would be good for your rabbit, you can follow the guidelines we mentioned about feeding them to avoid problems.Simply put, bunnies can eat kale, but there must be cautious measures to avoid risks. .

Rabbit diet

Your rabbits' diet plan should include clean water and at least one bundle, about the size of your pet, of high-quality hay per day.On the side, you can also provide a controlled portion of leafy greens and commercial pellets.An adult-sized handful of washed, dark leafy greens and between one or two egg cups of pellets a day depending on your pet's size is appropriate.Our guide gives an overview of a good daily diet for healthy adult rabbits:.If using bottles, check daily that rabbits can access the water and the end isn't blocked.Rabbits must have an adult-sized handful of safe washed leafy green vegetables, herbs and weeds daily.Introduce new types of greens gradually in small amounts to avoid potential stomach upsets. .

Feeding Your Rabbit

If you introduce new foods too quickly, or feed inappropriate food choices, the rabbit's normal digestive flora (normal bacteria) will be disturbed, gas- and toxin-producing bacteria can overgrow, and the rabbit may become very sick and possibly die.Rabbits should have a daily diet of mostly hay, a smaller amount of fresh vegetables, and a limited number of pellets.Unlimited, high-quality grass hay, such as Timothy, orchard or brome, should make up the bulk of a rabbit's diet.Grass hay is high in fiber, which is critical to maintaining a rabbit’s healthy digestive tract.A pet rabbit's diet should be supplemented with a variety of leafy green vegetables every day.Introduce new vegetables slowly and in small quantities, and monitor for soft feces, diarrhea, or signs of gas pain."Carrots should be fed sparingly, as they are very high in carbohydrate and may upset GI bacterial flora.".Other acceptable vegetables include broccoli, green peppers, Brussel sprouts, endive, wheat grass, radicchio, and squash.Carrots should be fed sparingly, as they are very high in carbohydrate and may upset GI bacterial flora.The high sugar content in fruits (and even carrots) may upset the normal GI tract bacteria if given in excess.These pellets serve as a rich source of nutrients for the rabbit, specifically protein and vitamins B and K. Most owners never observe this behavior, as it happens in the early hours of the morning. .

29 Rabbit-Resistant Plants That Rabbits Won't Eat in Your Garden

Rabbits are cute creatures, hopping around twitching their noses, wiggling their tails, and looking harmless.Unfortunately, these adorable fuzzy-tailed mammals also have a voracious appetite, which is why it helps to know which plants rabbits won’t eat.These hungry nibblers will find their way into your garden at night and eat your lettuce and other edible goodies.Rabbits adore lettuce and other tender greens, but they’ll ignore the following plants entirely.This ingredient adds a ton of flavor to dishes and pairs well with any type of cuisine.In fact, any plant in the allium family is unattractive to rabbits, including green onions and chives.You’ll need to keep your seedlings protected since rabbits might munch on the tender stems.Aside from the ripe stems, the rest of the rhubarb plant is toxic to humans and rabbits don’t like it either.Every morning when I check on my garden, I tussle the tops of my herb plants to dislodge the delicious scent of this easy-to-grow perennial.Don’t forget that other plants in the mint family, like catmint and catnip, are unattractive to hares.Another eye-catching perennial, this yellow mini sunflower-esque bloom is super easy to grow and tolerates a variety of soils.This is another flower that rabbits don’t care for that tolerates poor soils and spreads to form carpets of tiny blooms.They’re incredibly easy to grow from seed, and once they’ve found their footing, the explosion of blooms doesn’t stop until frost arrives.Thankfully, even if rabbits become interested in your sunflower plants, it’s easy to deter them from these hulking flowers.Plant pungent crops around the base of flowers or spread potent smelling powders to keep rabbits away.Ageratum has pretty round, purple flowers that attract bees and butterflies while sending rabbits hopping away.They bloom reliably all season long in vibrant pink, red, yellow, and orange.Begonias make gorgeous houseplants, but if you intersperse them around your garden you can ensure that you’ll have some color that even the hungriest bunny won’t bother.The purple, round blossoms are eye-catching and attract butterflies and bees while keeping rabbits and deer away.While it has been used to treat a range of stomach issues (not to mention to make absinthe), rabbits don’t dig it.The classic scent and stunning flowers are worth the little effort it takes to grow this garden staple.This classic green herb has a subtle anise-like flavor that goes perfectly with eggs, chicken, and fish.Sage – also a member of the mint family – is a Mediterranean herb that has found a way into gardens across the world.These plants come in a range of sizes and shapes, so there is certainly one for any garden where you want to add a little texture while keeping rabbits away.If you have an outdoor camera on your property, catching a nocturnal feast in action is super simple.Unlike some insect pests, rabbits don’t cut little tiny holes in plants.If you spot tender seedlings cut off clean at the base of the stem, you may have a rabbit problem.Unlike some insect pests, rabbits don’t cut little tiny holes in plants.If you spot tender seedlings cut off clean at the base of the stem, you may have a rabbit problem.Aside from planting stuff, they’ll turn their noses up at, here are a few other solutions for keeping rabbits out of your garden:.Rabbits have a great sense of smell, so sprinkling things like hot pepper powder around your garden can help keep them away.Rabbits have a great sense of smell, so sprinkling things like hot pepper powder around your garden can help keep them away.To keep your seedlings from being bitten off at the base, use collars to protect the vulnerable plants once they’re transplanted outside in the spring.To keep your seedlings from being bitten off at the base, use collars to protect the vulnerable plants once they’re transplanted outside in the spring.Whether you use good ole’ chicken wire or something more aesthetically pleasing, a fence that’s at least 4-feet high can keep rabbits away from your garden.Whether you use good ole’ chicken wire or something more aesthetically pleasing, a fence that’s at least 4-feet high can keep rabbits away from your garden.Clear debris around your property, and especially near your garden, to discourage rabbits from making a home in your yard.They don’t typically go too far from their burrows to find food, so try to reduce possible hiding spots, and you’ll make it harder for them to nap between meals.With a few simple adjustments and careful plant selection, you can deter midnight snacking and coexist with fluffy bunnies.Some store-bought rabbit repellents are not safe on edible plants, so be sure to read the packaging carefully before applying any. .

What vegetable/fruits plants will rabbits not eat?

No matter whether you think bunnies are cute or a total pest, it's important to safeguard against rabbits, because if you don't, they'll clean your garden dry. .

Can Rabbits Eat Kale?

As you continue to explore dietary options for bunnies, you may have wondered “Can rabbits eat kale”.Even though rabbits eat predominant hay, it does not mean that you cannot surprise their tastebuds with a variety of treats.However, if you feed your rabbit a small amount of kale, two to three times a week, no harm will come to him or her.If you decide to feed your rabbit kale, you can safely do so if you cautiously follow certain guidelines.You can give your rabbit a piece of kale that is the size of your palm a couple of times per week without any adverse effects on your bun.If your rabbit is getting calcium and its other nutritional needs from other foods, you can scale back on the kale.As such you should keep track of how much calcium is already in your rabbit’s diet so that you can manage the amounts accordingly.It is a supporting act since kale cannot provide all the nutrients that your rabbit needs to be healthy.When introducing new foods into your rabbit’s diet, you should offer them a little at first and then observe for any sign of intolerance.However, on the upside, most rabbits tolerate small amounts of kale with no issues whatsoever.You should also make sure that your kale is washed thoroughly, to ensure that all residual pesticides and chemicals are removed.You may know by now that kale is extremely nutritious and is packed full of vitamins and minerals that can positively affect your rabbit’s health.Your rabbit’s body needs protein to function efficiently, build muscle mass, and gain weight.Your rabbit’s body needs protein to function efficiently, build muscle mass, and gain weight.Vitamin A also helps your rabbit’s lungs, kidneys, heart, and other critical organs work properly.– This vitamin helps maintain a healthy immune system, normal vision, and keeps reproductive organs in good working order.Vitamin A also helps your rabbit’s lungs, kidneys, heart, and other critical organs work properly.– This vitamin is important since it facilitates blood clotting and promotes accelerated wound healing.Calcium – This mineral helps rabbits develop strong bones and teeth.It also helps keep your rabbit’s heart, muscle, and nervous system functioning properly.It also helps keep your rabbit’s heart, muscle, and nervous system functioning properly.As you can tell even in small amounts, there are enormous health benefits for your rabbit if you decide to add it to her list of treats.As such, it is better that you err on the side of caution and stay away from any type of processed food for your rabbits.While you can get fresh kale at the farmers’ markets and supermarkets, it is often found in the frozen foods section.Your baby buns have immature digestive systems and should not be offered kale in small amounts until they are older.Rabbits need a high fiber diet to maintain a healthy digestive system.Fruits and vegetables -These food groups provide the vitamins and minerals that are required for growth and health.So, if you want to add kale to your rabbit’s dietary regime, you can do so in modest portions.They are purely supplemental but can be added to the variety of foods that you feed your rabbit.However, you should be mindful not to be heavy-handed with kale since it’s high in calcium and oxalates and may cause kidney and bladder issues. .

Rabbit Food List: What Fruits and Vegetables Are Safe for Rabbits

What your rabbit eats can significantly impact her quality of life, so keeping your bunny happy means feeding her the right foods.Here’s a list of safe vegetables and fruits for rabbits, followed by those to avoid, to keep your furry friend healthy and happy.Make sure to wash all fruits and vegetables and remove seeds and stems before offering them to your pet rabbit. .

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