—Laurie Lufkin, Essex, Massachusetts Go to Recipe Serving this entree salad gives me hope that warmer days aren't too far off.Fajita in a Bowl Pull out the skewers and take a stab at grilling peppers, onions and corn for an awesome steak salad that’s all summer and smoke.—Taste of Home Test Kitchen, Milwaukee, Wisconsin Go to Recipe Pull out the skewers and take a stab at grilling peppers, onions and corn for an awesome steak salad that’s all summer and smoke.—Billie Moss, Walnut Creek, California Go to Recipe It's surprising how a few herbs can brighten up tuna salad.Peppery salad greens, sweet grapes and rich walnuts combine to create a flavor sensation.—Nancy Heishman, Las Vegas, Nevada Go to Recipe This satisfying salad proves that turkey can be enjoyed outside of the holidays.Peppery salad greens, sweet grapes and rich walnuts combine to create a flavor sensation.The colorful slaw and juicy steak combo is super quick and wonderful for breezy weeknight dinners.The colorful slaw and juicy steak combo is super quick and wonderful for breezy weeknight dinners.—Mildred Sherrer, Fort Worth, Texas Go to Recipe With a wonderful mix of flavors, colors and textures, this impressive salad can be made in minutes for lunch with a friend or for a light dinner with your sweetie.—Sharon Tipton, Casselberry, Florida Go to Recipe This cool noodle salad makes a great casual one-bowl dinner or a perfect dish for a potluck or buffet.—Darla Andrews, Boerne, Texas Go to Recipe This fresh rice dish tastes like the Mediterranean in a bowl!Tasty Taco Chopped Salad My friends and I love Mexican food, but we try to eat healthy.—Matthew Smith, Knippa, Texas Go to Recipe My friends and I love Mexican food, but we try to eat healthy.—Jamie Porter, Garnett, Kansas Go to Recipe My husband and I really enjoy both shrimp scampi and fresh spinach salad, so I put the two together.Chicken Pasta Caesar Salad My colleagues and I made a pact to eat healthier, and we took turns sharing dishes.—Teresa Jordan, Springville, Utah Go to Recipe My colleagues and I made a pact to eat healthier, and we took turns sharing dishes.Shrimp, tomatoes, ham and peppers give the dish bright colors and a delightful texture.—Karen Rahn, Hixon, Tennessee Go to Recipe My cold rice salad has a little hint of spice for a classic jambalaya-style kick.Shrimp, tomatoes, ham and peppers give the dish bright colors and a delightful texture.—Susan Voigt, Plymouth, Minnesota Go to Recipe Here's a one-of-a-kind pasta salad that combines tender chicken, sweet apricots and crunchy vegetables.—Muriel Bertrand, Shoreview, Minnesota Go to Recipe In spring we look for something light and refreshing on the menu after the heavier comfort food of winter; this salad is a great solution.—Robin Haas, Hyde Park, Massachusetts Go to Recipe Spinach and tortellini go so well together, and this salad makes an easy meal with leftover cooked chicken.—Eileen Budnyk, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida Go to Recipe The heat, seasonings and appearance of this colorful main-dish salad are perfect for summer—or any time of year that you want to summon memories of sunshine.—Karie Houghton, Lynnwood, Washington Go to Recipe We use this super-duper chicken across several meals, including it in tacos, sandwiches, omelets and enchiladas.This salad combines some of our favorite ingredients in one dish...and with the hard-boiled eggs and kidney beans, it delivers enough protein to satisfy those who are skeptical of vegetarian fare.This salad combines some of our favorite ingredients in one dish...and with the hard-boiled eggs and kidney beans, it delivers enough protein to satisfy those who are skeptical of vegetarian fare.—Jenny Lynch, Rock Island, Illinois Go to Recipe My family loves pasta salads, but usually they have too much mayonnaise or oily dressing.—Mary Ann Lee, Clifton Park, New York Go to Recipe For a cool salad on a hot summer day, I combine shrimp, corn, tomatoes and nectarines with a drizzle of tarragon dressing.—Bess Blanco, Vail, Arizona Go to Recipe From the first time I made this chicken dish, I knew it was a winner—the bowl came back to the kitchen scraped clean.Taste of Home Mimi's Lentil Medley I made this one summer evening by putting together what I had on hand.—Mary Ann Hazen, Rochester Hills, Michigan Go to Recipe I made this one summer evening by putting together what I had on hand.— Mya Zeronis, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Go to Recipe In less than 30 minutes, I can put together this hearty salad of pasta, white beans and veggies – and it’s good for a crowd.— Jenni Dise, Phoenix, Arizona Go to Recipe Stuffed tomatoes provide endless options when you add meat, cheese, rice, veggies – or in this case, orzo.—Leah Lyon, Ada, Oklahoma Go to Recipe We pile our favorite gyro fixin’s into nutritious quinoa bowls.Apple Sausage Salad with Cinnamon Vinaigrette Making croutons with cinnamon-raisin bread is sweet genius.—Kim Van Dunk, Caldwell, New Jersey Go to Recipe Making croutons with cinnamon-raisin bread is sweet genius.Mediterranean Spinach & Beans If you want to make this dish vegetarian, use soy sauce instead of Worcestershire.—Becky Cuba, Spotsylvania, Virginia Go to Recipe If you want to make this dish vegetarian, use soy sauce instead of Worcestershire.—Cindy Heinbaugh, Aurora, Colorado Go to Recipe We love this chilled chicken salad brimming with colorful veggies.—Julie Kirkpatrick, Billings, Montana Go to Recipe With pasta salad, it’s easy to change up ingredients.—Valerie Belley, St. Louis, Missouri Go to Recipe Like the French, I pack my classic Nicoise salad with veggies, potatoes, tuna and eggs.—Janine Cooper-Moren, Portland, Oregon Go to Recipe My husband and I fell hard for the curried chicken salad from our grocery store deli, and I knew I could find a way to make something similar.—Chrysa Duran, Cambridge, Minnesota Go to Recipe Classic pear salad gets an innovative makeover with chicken and maple vinaigrette.—Sarah Smiley, Bangor, Maine Go to Recipe When the weather sizzles, get your chill on with a cool chicken salad.Taste of Home Southwest Shredded Pork Salad This knockout shredded pork makes a healthy, delicious and hearty salad with black beans, corn, cotija cheese and plenty of fresh greens.—Mary Shivers, Ada, Oklahoma Go to Recipe This knockout shredded pork makes a healthy, delicious and hearty salad with black beans, corn, cotija cheese and plenty of fresh greens.Sesame Beef & Asparagus Salad Cooking is one of my favorite hobbies—especially when it comes to experimenting with fresh ingredients like these.Salmon and Spud Salad I headed straight for the kitchen when I decided to pick up a healthier lifestyle.—Matthew Teixeira, Milton, Ontario Go to Recipe I headed straight for the kitchen when I decided to pick up a healthier lifestyle.—Natalie Van Apeldoorn, Vancouver, British Columbia Go to Recipe During my undergrad years, my roommate taught me how to cook vegetarian dishes like brown rice with pintos.—Darla Andrews, Schertz, Texas Go to Recipe This bright baby kale salad is packed with a little bit of everything: hearty greens, a nutty crunch, a zip of citrusy goodness and a big protein punch.—Michelle Mulrain, Evans, Georgia Go to Recipe I tasted many types of Asian chicken salad in California.The delicious taste and smooth texture of avocados mixed with the crisp shrimp salad is heavenly.—Teri Rasey, Cadillac, Michigan Go to Recipe This salad can be served as a cool and satisfying dinner or lunch.The delicious taste and smooth texture of avocados mixed with the crisp shrimp salad is heavenly.—Renata Smith, Brookline, Massachusetts Go to Recipe You can also transform this tasty bowl into an Italian version with mozzarella, pesto, tomatoes, spinach and basil.—Yvonne Starlin, Westmoreland, Tennessee Go to Recipe Pasta salad loaded with steak, peppers and onions makes both my boyfriend and me happy.—Sharon Tipton, Casselberry, FL Go to Recipe For picnics and potlucks, we make a salad of smoked turkey, wild rice and dried cherries.—Alma Winberry, Great Falls, Montana Go to Recipe At lunch one day, a friend told me about a steak salad she'd had at a party.—Wendy Ball, Battle Creek, Michigan Go to Recipe Bright berries and creamy goat cheese make this one a winner!—Elizabeth Bennett, Seattle, Washington Go to Recipe This delicious quinoa avocado salad is high in protein and holds well in the fridge for a few days.—Jenny Dawson, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin Go to Recipe We eat a power salad packed with salmon and spinach at least once a week.—Nancy Heishman, Las Vegas, Nevada Go to Recipe This salad is perfect for using up leftover turkey, chicken or deli meat.Sesame ginger salad dressing adds refreshing flavor to this pairing of broiled chicken and an exotic homemade coleslaw.Sesame ginger salad dressing adds refreshing flavor to this pairing of broiled chicken and an exotic homemade coleslaw.—Sarah Johnson, Indianapolis, Indiana Go to Recipe We make quinoa with spinach and strawberries year-round, but it's most fun when we go to the farmers market to get the season’s first berries.—Taylor Kiser, Brandon, Florida Go to Recipe This "skinny" version of Cobb salad has all the taste and creaminess with half the fat and calories.—Jan Meyer, St.

Paul, Minnesota Go to Recipe I’ve used my Nicoise as an appetizer or a main-dish salad, and it’s a winner every time I put it on the table.It’s versatile, so you can use asparagus in place of green beans and salmon instead of tuna, or add garden tomatoes.—Nick Monfre, Oak Ridge, New Jersey Go to Recipe This salad makes it easy to eat what’s good for you.It’s versatile, so you can use asparagus in place of green beans and salmon instead of tuna, or add garden tomatoes.—Jean Murawski, Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan Go to Recipe For a salad with refreshing color and crunch, we toss chicken and spinach with mandarin oranges and red onion, then splash everything with a tangy vinaigrette.With smoky barbecued pork and a variety of fresh herbs and vegetables, this is a comforting and tasty home-cooked meal.With smoky barbecued pork and a variety of fresh herbs and vegetables, this is a comforting and tasty home-cooked meal.Taste of Home Summer Splash Chicken Salad When it’s too hot to eat inside, I head out to the patio. .

How to Wash Lettuce With or Without Salad Spinner

Lift the lettuce or greens up and out of the water, leaving the dirt and debris behind, and put in a colander or on a clean kitchen towel or layers of paper towels. .

How to Wash Lettuce - Bon Appétit

Below, reader Glen confesses his poorly washed salad greens to senior food editor Rick Martinez.__Dear Rick,__I thought I was being a good team player by offering to bring a salad to my friend's summer cookout.When I first graduated culinary school, I worked the garde manger station at a farm-to-table restaurant in New York.At the height of summer, I was responsible for 12 salads on the menu—in other words, I had a boatload of greens to wash and prep.The easiest way to clean your greens is to agitate and soak them in a large quantity of water.At the restaurant, that meant filling 10-gallon sinks with cold water to soak 20 heads of lettuce at a time.You want the moving water to shake the dirt out of the nooks and crannies in the leaves.Also look for dirt in the hidden "elbow," the area where leaves attach to the stem.Wait about 10 minutes, then lift the greens out of the water without disturbing the dirt about the bottom. .

How to Wash Lettuce the Right Way: 2 Methods & FAQs

Heads of lettuce like romaine are notoriously difficult to wash because of the creases between the leaves where dirt and grit can hide.Customers that order salad from your menu expect to see clean, crisp lettuce that's free from grit and perfectly coated in dressing.If your lettuce is wilted or damp, the vinaigrette won't cling to the greens and the dish loses its appeal.Try these two methods for washing romaine lettuce and other types of greens to make sure they look and taste great.The cold bath soaking method is the best way to wash large quantities of lettuce like romaine, green leaf, or butterhead.When you're working with cases of lettuce that need to be prepped quickly, soaking allows you to make the most of your time.The running water method is a great way to clean lettuce, but it's not practical for washing whole cases of produce.Lay the freshly washed leaves on a clean flour sack towel to dry.If you pack freshly washed greens into one container with no air flow, moisture will cause the leaves to wilt.A drain tray placed in the bottom of the pan will prevent any remaining water droplets from pooling around the produce.For added measure, place a couple clean paper towels in the pan to absorb any moisture left behind.For added measure, place a couple clean paper towels in the pan to absorb any moisture left behind.Lay out the lettuce on a clean flour sack towel and roll it up into a tube shape with the leaves inside.Harmful bacteria from the soil can contaminate fruits and vegetables and lead to a foodborne illness if consumed.There’s a higher risk associated with produce that is eaten raw, like romaine lettuce and salad greens.The cooking process eliminates bacteria, so uncooked foods don't benefit from the high temperatures that kill pathogens.Make sure to carefully wash your salad greens to remove pesticides, dirt, and harmful bacteria.The best way to avoid purchasing contaminated greens for your restaurant is to work with produce suppliers that follow strict adherence to a food safety management program.In 2020, the FDA created an action plan to address the safety concerns related to contaminated leafy greens.Check out the Leafy Greens STEC Action Plan to learn how the FDA is taking steps to prevent future outbreaks.You can make your lettuce prep more efficient and improve the quality of your leafy greens by using our guide. .

Lettuce, Other Leafy Greens, and Food Safety

CDC estimates that germs on produce eaten raw cause a large percentage of U.S. foodborne illnesses.Other harmful germs found on leafy greens include norovirus, Salmonella, Listeria, and Cyclospora.People who have health problems or take medicines that lower the body’s ability to fight germs and sickness (a weakened immune system) external icon.To reduce your chance of getting sick, always follow the steps for safely handling and preparing leafy greens before eating or serving them.Always follow the steps for safely handling and preparing leafy greens before feeding them to pets and other animals.Studies show that this step removes some of the germs and dirt on leafy greens and other vegetables and fruits.What other food safety steps should I keep in mind when I select, store, and prepare leafy greens and other produce?Make sure pre-cut produce, such as bagged salad or cut fruits and vegetables, is refrigerated or on ice at the store.Separate produce from raw meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs in your shopping cart, grocery bags, and refrigerator.Store leafy greens, salads, and all pre-cut and packaged produce in a clean refrigerator with the temperature set to 40°F or colder.Use separate cutting boards and utensils for produce and for raw meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs.Wash utensils, cutting boards, and kitchen surfaces with hot, soapy water after each use.Cook thoroughly or throw away any produce that touches raw meat, poultry, seafood or their juices.Germs that make people sick can be found in many places, including in the soil, in the feces or poop of animals, in refrigerators, and on kitchen surfaces.For example, germs from animal poop can get in irrigation water or fields where theexternal icon vegetables grow.Germs can also get on leafy greens in packing and processing facilities, in trucks used for shipping, from the unwashed hands of food handlers, and in the kitchen.To prevent contamination, leafy greens should be grown and handled safely at all points from farm to fork.Read a study by CDC and partners on what we have learned from 10 years of investigating E. coli outbreaks linked to leafy greens.In 2014–2018, a total of 51 foodborne disease outbreaks linked to leafy greens (mainly lettuce) were reported to CDC.Most recently, in 2019–2021, CDC investigated and warned the public about nine multistate outbreaks linked to leafy greens.All kinds of produce, including organic leafy greens, can be contaminated with harmful germs at any point from farm to fork.Leafy greens grown using these methods also can be contaminated with harmful germs at any point from farm to fork.CDC is collaborating with FDA, academia, and industry to investigate the factors that contribute to leafy greens contamination.The leafy greens industry, FDA, and state regulatory authorities have been implementing provisions of the Produce Safety Ruleexternal icon as part of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).external icon They are considering what further measures can be taken.

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Quarterly Resets

Dirt and dust can settle on the outside, large root systems can develop on the inside, and debris, nutrients, and other sediment can accumulate in the reservoir.These can fall apart or dip into the reservoir where they can potentially clog your pump and make it difficult to remove seedlings from the Farmstand.Additionally, dense root systems can block or divert water from other seedlings on your Farmstand which can cause them to wilt and die.This is typically made up of root debris, dirt, pieces of grow medium, and nutrient or pH down precipitate*.Replacing this with fresh water makes it easier to balance pH, allows plants to absorb nutrients, and removes conditions where algae and bacteria flourish.Resetting your Farmstand gives you the opportunity to remove older seedlings that have past their prime or are no longer suited to the current weather.Plants can bolt, become unhealthy, and attract pests or disease when they reach the end of their lifecycle or are grown past their ideal growing season.Removing these plants during a reset helps growers enjoy their harvests and makes room for new seedlings!It can be helpful to leave your Farmstand empty for a few days after a reset to ensure any pests or disease have completely gone.Place the plant’s grow medium and root system in a bowl or tub filled with water to keep them hydrated. .

How to Clean Your Fruits and Vegetables with Vinegar — Ashley Lillis

Cleaning fruits and vegetables is important because it rids the produce of unwanted bacteria or chemicals.The vinegar helps to kill any spores on the fruits and vegetables and can prevent mold from forming earlier. .

How to Clean & Store Garden Lettuce

Most lettuce is enjoyed fresh and raw, so it requires proper washing to ensure there is no harmful bacteria present. .

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