Seafood and Okra Gumbo is full of fresh shrimp, crabmeat, and oysters in a rich and flavorful roux with plenty of spice.The okra for this recipe is cooked for 30 minutes.The darker you get your roux, the more flavor your gumbo will have.Seafood and Okra Gumbo Seafood and Okra Gumbo is full of fresh shrimp, crabmeat, and oysters in a rich and flavorful roux with plenty of spice.PREP: 15 mins COOK: 1 hr 30 mins SERVINGS: 8 1x 2x 3x Save Print Pin Ingredients ▢ 1/2 cup plus 3 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided.▢ 4 cups shrimp or chicken stock.▢ 1 pint freshly shucked oysters with liquor Instructions In a large nonstick skillet, heat 3 tablespoons of Vegetable oil over medium heat.Add okra and cook, stirring frequently for 25 to 30 minutes or until okra is lightly browned and no longer slimy.While okra is cooking, make the roux.Add garlic and cook 2 minutes.Add tomatoes, stock, bay leaves, salt, Creole seasoning, hot sauce, thyme, white pepper and okra.Add shrimp and cook for 2 minutes or until they are mostly pink.Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. .

Cajun Gumbo With Chicken and Andouille Sausage Recipe

Why It Works This recipe lets you choose which traditional thickener to use: okra or filé powder (or both).Simmering the roux from the beginning (as opposed to adding it later) leads to a deeper, more complex, and cleaner flavor.There's the roux, and the aromatic base of vegetables that are common to plenty of other Cajun and Creole dishes, like étouffée and jambalaya.A lot of dishes get smacked with the "more than the sum of its parts" description, but with gumbo, I find it to be more literally true.Any one of gumbo's components would add an interesting flavor to another dish, but all of them together tie a culinary knot that isn't so easily untangled.Gumbo is more like many stews, at times strikingly different ones, making it hard to always spot the common threads.There are gumbos with chicken and shrimp, with turkey, with crabs, with duck and beef and pork, all manner of sausage and frog and, yes, nutria (the rodent).Then there's gumbo z'herbes, a Lenten version made with an acre's worth of sundry greens and not a scrap from the animal kingdom.They also share an aromatic base, known in Cajun and Creole cooking as the "holy trinity," of diced onions, green bell pepper, and celery.Even when you get down to the essence of gumbo, it slithers between your fingers, refusing to be pinned down to any single explanation.).Its influences are African (okra), French (roux), Choctaw Indian (filé powder), German (sausages), Spanish, Italian, and more.I think it's cool that there could be two such equally credible etymologies, leaving nearly everything about gumbo perfectly obscured, almost as if it were fated to be this way.Since those steps are so familiar, the questions, for me, revolved around the roux (how to make it, and when to add it) and the thickeners, okra and filé powder (what each contributes to the pot, and how a cook should decide on which to reach for).I worked for weeks on a recipe for Cajun gumbo, with chicken and andouille sausage, to learn more.When flour is cooked with butter very briefly and then thinned with milk, you end up with béchamel, or white sauce; add stock and pan drippings to a roux, and you have gravy.Toast the flour more (in butter or oil), and it progresses through shades of darkness until it's the color of chocolate, just shy of black.The low heat is an insurance policy—you can raise it and cook your roux faster, but your margin of error shrinks accordingly.The cost of this approach is the tedium of standing over the pot, stirring frequently to make sure the layer of flour on the bottom of the vessel hasn't burned.You can make the most of that time by using it to dice your trinity of aromatic vegetables, bouncing back and forth between stirring and chopping.But, once again, multitasking adds to the risk: Get too caught up in the bell pepper you're cutting up, and you may accidentally burn your roux.If you have lots of time near the kitchen, as I did one day when testing this recipe while working from home, it can be a great approach.Without the oil to help distribute heat more evenly, I found that my flour cooked irregularly, making it easier to burn some particles while I waited for others to catch up.As someone who already spends more than enough time in the kitchen, any minutes I could shave off my gumbo recipe without compromising it would be a win.Everyone at Serious Eats who tried separate batches representing each approach preferred the flavor of the gumbo cooked in consecutive stages.I have a thought about why: A roux acts as an emulsifier, holding the oil molecules evenly dispersed throughout the water and not allowing them to separate.When the roux is in the pot from the beginning and simmers throughout the entire cooking time, the emulsion is more likely to break, allowing fats to pool on the surface and leaving a thinner liquid base behind.When the roux is added later on and simmered for a shorter period of time, it has a better chance of holding a more stable emulsion.Its similarity to tea doesn't end there—it also tastes distinctly tea-like, with a clean, green, herbal vibe.Go easy; even a half teaspoon can be enough to gloss up the liquids and give the gumbo an herbal edge. .

Shrimp and Okra Gumbo Recipe

A seafood gumbo is thickened with okra and packed with shrimp to make a low-country classic stew.But if you'd like to call it shrimp and okra stew, you're free to do so.". .

Good New Orleans Creole Gumbo Recipe

Family recipes are suppose to be just that, kept in the family.Rating: 5 stars I was looking for an authentic gumbo recipe and I found it.Rating: 5 stars My family's favorite gumbo.But I must say this the roux is the KEY, if you don't make this right you can hang it up.Lets double it, it takes 1 hour & using a wisk & constantly stirring on medium low heat.Now after adding the seafood, you can remove the whole pot from the eye because the Gumbo will be so hot it will cook your shrimp, scallops, & crab meat.Rating: 5 stars Great recipe!I'm from the South and my family always makes gumbo without tomatoes.We all share recipes our families love, and I am thankful this gumbo recipe was shared!When i tell you that everyone LOVED this gumbo i mean EVERYONE.I didnt use the bacon drippings because i burn the first roix i tryed to make ( not much a suprise) and i didnt feel like going to get more bacon so i used butter worked great and got it right the first time.The store was sold out of andouille so i went with the next best thing for texans Earl Camble hot links.Rating: 5 stars THis is one of the best gumbo's I've ever had and my family is from the south so that is saying a lot, just dont tell my mother or grandmother.This will be our gumbo recipe for years to come..Rating: 5 stars I know little about Creole cooking and this is the real deal. .

New Orleans Chicken Andouille Sausage Gumbo

How to make gumbo.Simmer chicken in water until fully cooked.Add in okra, tomatoes, and sausage.Simmer herbs, cayenne, salt, pepper, and water.Add chicken.How do you thicken gumbo with a roux?A dark roux base combined with other thickening ingredients like okra (use pre-cut frozen okra if fresh is not available) and Zatarain’s gumbo file provides the characteristic gumbo taste.Adding in dried thyme, basil, bay leaf, basil, cayenne pepper, and smoky Aidells Cajun andouille sausage gives it layers of flavor and a spicy kick that is distinctive in Creole cooking.What do you serve with gumbo?More Soup recipes.It is used to thicken gumbo just before serving.Chicken Andouille Sausage Gumbo Get a taste of New Orleans cuisine at home with this savory and delicious chicken andouille sausage gumbo!, ▢ ½ cup water , to cook the okra., ▢ ½ teaspoon black pepper.In a medium-sized saucepan, add okra and ½ cup of water.Add onion, bell peppers, celery, and garlic.Add cooked okra, tomatoes, and sliced Andouille sausage.You may add more water depending on how thick you want the gumbo.Add cooked shredded chicken and simmer an additional 15 minutes.Strainer Notes Recipe Source: “Favorite Recipes from Famous New Orleans Restaurants”, by Express Publishing Co. (1981) Want to save this recipe? .

Authentic New Orleans Style Gumbo

This Authentic New Orleans Gumbo is made with a dark roux, vegetables, chicken, sausage, and shrimp, and served over rice.As you probably have gathered, I love making comfort food style recipes that use lots of fresh produce and real ingredients.This gumbo is no exception, and if you like this then I know you’ll love Jambalaya and Instant Pot Red Beans and Rice.We had a really fun neighbor growing up who was from New Orleans and made a fantastic homemade Gumbo!I’m so thankful my Mom took him up on his offer to teach her how to make a true, authentic Gumbo!Jambalaya is primarily a rice dish (think paella) while gumbo is more of a stew that is thickened with a roux and made with chicken, sausage, and/or seafood.Both gumbo and jambalaya are often made with some similar meats and vegetables but the process of making them and flavors of the end result are completely different.A “roux” is made with two ingredients; flour and oil, and it’s the key to any great gumbo recipe!The flour and oil are cooked and stirred together for about 30-45 minutes until it becomes dark brown almost like mud, or chocolate and the consistency of dough.The roux is what adds the deep, rich flavor to the gumbo, and it gives it it’s thick texture.in a large pot, combine flour and oil and cook, stirring constantly on medium low heat.When you’re ready to make your gumbo, start by chopping celery, onions, bell pepper, parsley.I love the freshness from the green bell pepper, onion, celery and parsley.Add chicken broth veggies, parsley, and roux to the pot and stir well.The roux can be made 3-5 days in advance, stored in a large resealable bag in the fridge.To freeze, allow it to cool completely and store it in a freezer safe container (separate from the rice) for 2-3 months.Print Pin Rate Author Lauren Allen Course Main Course, Soup Cuisine American Servings 6 Calories 464 Prep 20 mins Cook 1 hr Total 1 hr 20 mins Add to Meal Plan Go to Collections Video Ingredients US Customary Metric 1x 2x 3x For the Roux: ▢ 1 heaping cup all-purpose flour.▢ cooked white rice for serving Instructions Make the Roux*: In a large, heavy bottom stock pot combine flour and oil.This part takes patience--when it's finished it should be as dark as chocolate and have a soft, "cookie dough" like consistency.Feel free to add a little more flour or oil as needed to reach this consistency.Add ½ cup of the chicken broth to the hot skillet that had the sausage to deglaze the pan.To freeze gumbo, allow it to cool completely and store it in a freezer safe container (separate from the rice) for 2-3 months.I originally shared this recipe in 2015 but updated it in November 2017 and again in December 2019 with process photos and step-by-step instructions. .

Chicken Shrimp and Okra Gumbo

Gumbo is a traditional Louisiana Creole dish and comforting soul food.This surprisingly easy chicken, shrimp, and okra, and rich chocolate-colored roux all blend deliciously together.It is versatile because you can choose chicken, meat, seafood, andouille sausage, and ham for a mouthwatering stew.Gumbo (an African word for okra) is a traditional Louisiana Creole dish and comforting soul food.Surprisingly easy, chicken, shrimp, and okra, and rich chocolate-colored roux all blend deliciously together.It is versatile because you can choose chicken, meat, seafood, andouille sausage, and ham for a mouthwatering stew.The key to a great gumbo is the roux–a roux is basically equal parts of oil and flour stirred together to eliminate the floury taste.With gumbo, the stirring is prolonged to achieve a chocolate color to intensify the stew’s flavor.The fusion of West African, French, Spanish, and Choctaw cultures creates an incredible flavor explosion.The rich roux and holy trinity (diced onion, celery, and green peppers inspired by France’s mirepoix) and gumbo filé (sassafras tree leaves) are mouthwatering.Once you look past the ingredients, you understand that it is not a scary process – it’s straightforward and no more complicated than making stew.Salt intensifies all other flavors, and black pepper gives the dish the right amount of heat that won’t burn your taste buds.Salt intensifies all other flavors, and black pepper gives the dish the right amount of heat that won’t burn your taste buds.I personally love it fresh, then slightly caramelized to add a bit of sweetness.I personally love it fresh, then slightly caramelized to add a bit of sweetness.This pepper has the least level of spice, and the contrasting taste of bitterness and sweetness adds character and depth to the dish.This pepper has the least level of spice, and the contrasting taste of bitterness and sweetness adds character and depth to the dish.A vital ingredient in the holy trinity that is a staple in Cajun and Creole cooking.A vital ingredient in the holy trinity that is a staple in Cajun and Creole cooking.It adds depth and richness to every gumbo and other dish, plus it’s quick to put together and can be easily customized for personal preference.It adds depth and richness to every gumbo and other dish, plus it’s quick to put together and can be easily customized for personal preference.Smoked Paprika Red pepper without heat and a delicious smoky flavor that enhances whatever recipe that has it.Red pepper without heat and a delicious smoky flavor that enhances whatever recipe that has it.This fantastic veggie adds the balancing effect of acidity and a beautiful red color to sauces, soups, and stews.This fantastic veggie adds the balancing effect of acidity and a beautiful red color to sauces, soups, and stews.Most chain supermarkets or grocery stores with an ethnic food section should have it.If you want to replace it as a vegetable, green beans, zucchini, or nopales will make a delicious gumbo.If you want to replace it as a vegetable, green beans, zucchini, or nopales will make a delicious gumbo.Meat: You can add andouille sausage, and if you have a hunter in the family, wild game, like venison or duck, also goes well in the gumbo.Basically, it is equal parts of oil and flour, stirred together to eliminate the floury taste.In gumbo, the stirring is prolonged to achieve a chocolate color and intensify the stew’s flavor.Basically, it is equal parts of oil and flour, stirred together to eliminate the floury taste.In gumbo, the stirring is prolonged to achieve a chocolate color and intensify the stew’s flavor.The right timing – Adding the okra during the last 5 minutes will help cut the slime.Fill the bowl half-full of rice and serve Chicken Shrimp and Okra Gumbo over the top.My choice of sides usually includes cornbread, potato salad, and corn on the cob.With the smokiness of bacon and goodness of beef, no one will notice it’s an excellent way to eat liver.With the smokiness of bacon and goodness of beef, no one will notice it’s an excellent way to eat liver.The crisp sweetness with crunchy fried chicken is food for the soul.The crisp sweetness with crunchy fried chicken is food for the soul.(Photo 3) Make the roux – Cook on low heat, stirring continuously, for about 20 minutes or until it turns a rich dark brown color–just like chocolate.The holy trinity – When you have achieved your desired color , add the onion, garlic, green pepper, and celery, and cook for 8-10 minutes, stirring frequently.– When you have achieved your desired color , add the onion, garlic, green pepper, and celery, and cook for 8-10 minutes, stirring frequently.– Then pour in the can of tomatoes and about 6 cups of chicken stock, bring to a boil, and let it simmer for about 45 – 50 minutes.Finishing up – Stir in filé powder, green onions, and chopped parsley.(Photo 10) Adjust thickness soup and flavor with broth or water and salt. .

Okra Gumbo Recipe

The author describes her approach to this deeply flavorful stew as a diasporic gumbo influenced by recipes from West Africa, island, Lowcountry, and Louisiana. .

Creole Okra Gumbo Recipe - Creole Gumbo with Shrimp

Okra gumbo.Gumbo needs at least one of the three standard thickeners: a roux; filé, which is powdered sassafras leaves; and/or yes, okra.This Creole gumbo is a fascinating, wonderful example of a lighter gumbo with no roux.Cajun is largely white, skimps on tomatoes, and uses okra more sparingly.As a Creole gumbo, you might expect to see tomatoes here, and you’d be right. .

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