The towering stalks of the okra plant provide height, texture, and color to the home garden.Because okra germinates and grows best when planted in soil that has warmed above 80 degrees F, northern gardeners often start seeds in flats and transplant seedlings when the weather heats up.Okra can suffer from several pests and diseases, including cucumber beetles, white mold, Southern Blight, vascular wilt, bacterial spot, and powdery mildew.Okra pods can be cooked just after harvest in stews, gumbos, or as a fried side dish.Well suited to tropical and subtropical climates, okra is often associated with the Deep South, but it can be cultivated - even to seed maturity - throughout much of the United States.Okra pods continue to increase in size when left on the plant beyond the edible stage.Once the seeds inside are fully developed, the pods will begin to dry and should be harvested when they turn brown and brittle.Just as the solitary flowers of okra open at different times, beginning at the base of the plant and progressing upward, so do pods mature in this same pattern.Wearing gloves while harvesting and cleaning these spiny fruits helps prevent skin irritation.The stem end of the fruit can also be cut with a pruning sheers, allowing the seeds to pour out.Store okra seeds in a cool, dark, and dry place protected from pests. .

How do I save okra seeds for next year?

If you are growing okra seed pods to eat them, they should be harvested when they are three to five inches long.Once the pods have started to break open, remove them and split or twist them into a bowl or container.Once they have had a chance to fully dry, place the seeds into an airtight jar and put them in the refrigerator. .

Okra : From Seeds To Harvest

When growing vegetables, it is always exciting to care for the plant throughout its growing phase and then harvest it for delicious recipes later on, but one thing to watch out for is pests and diseases.Different plants are susceptible to different types of pests and diseases, and it is important to make yourself aware so you can keep a watchful eye and also take any preventative methods to keep your plants safe throughout their lifespan.Insects affecting okra plants include armyworms, corn earworms, cucumber beetles, cabbage loopers and more. .

How to Grow Okra

Similar in taste to eggplant, okra is used in shellfish, corn, onion and tomato dishes.The annual, warm weather vegetable is related to hibiscus, hollyhock and rose of Sharon.Plant okra in the spring or early summer once the threat of frost has passed.Gardeners in cool regions may want to start okra seeds indoors in peat pots four to six weeks before the area's final frost date.If buying okra plants, purchase those that are started in containers such as peat pots that can go into the ground.Okra is susceptible to wilt, root knot nematode and Southern stem blight.It grows and bears seed pods until frost, which quickly turns them black and kills them.Pick the pods at least every other day, as they quickly turn from tender to tough the bigger they grow.Because of the long growing season and hearty production, four or five plants usually produce enough okra for most families. .

How to Harvest Okra Seeds

Place the okra pods in the bag, fold over the top, then store in a dark, 45 degree Fahrenheit location until spring planting.Place the okra pods in the bag, fold over the top, then store in a dark, 45 degree Fahrenheit location until spring planting.Tip Harvest okra seed pods late in the season so that the storage time is minimized.Place a small packet of silica gel in the paper bag to help absorb any excess moisture. .

How to Save Okra Seeds

Whether you use okra as a garden vegetable plant or as a floral, if you have a good crop you can save seeds from your prized plants for next year's garden.Whether you use okra as a garden vegetable plant or as a floral, if you have a good crop you can save seeds from your prized plants for next year's garden.Gather the okra seeds from the inside of the okra and place them on some paper toweling.Planting Okra Seeds.Water deeply just often enough to keep the soil from drying out after the seedlings reach a height of 6 inches. .

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