"I want to show the world that the potato is so healthy that you could live off them alone for an extended period of time without any negative impact to your health," Voigt explained on his website.You also need a store of nutrients potatoes lack, such as vitamin A for proper vision, or else exit this diet blindly.The potato's charm is its mediocrity: It is a decent famine food, because it has modest amounts of many nutrients, as opposed to the so-called healthy orange, which just delivers vitamin C and some fiber.Potatoes get worse with the typical preparation: mashed and served with butter or gravy, or fried and salted."Potatoes can be an excellent part of a healthy diet, but are not a healthy single source diet," said Barry Swanson, regents professor and interim director of the School of Food Science at Washington State University and University of Idaho, a guy who traverses the two states that produce about half of North America's potatoes.This means the potato initially satisfies energy needs but, if that's your primary food source, leaves you hungry and tired a few hours later, Swanson said.For the record, Voigt told LiveScience his blood sugar level is in the mid-90s, slightly high but within normal range and actually lower than his pre-diet measurement.Some Inuit have survived long periods entirely on meat, attaining vitamin C in muktuk, the skin and blubber of whales.The poison is in the stem and leaves, but trace amounts can be in greenish spots on the potato itself and can cause serious illness if you eat enough. .

Could you survive on just one food?

Even fad diets that focus on just a few foods or on eliminating certain things are usually varied enough to be reasonably nutritious. .

Can a Person Live Off of a Diet of Potatoes and Butter?

This claim has been widely circulated online in meme form, with the slight modification of adding butter to the “menu” of the all-potato diet:.Katherine Basbaum, a cardiovascular dietitian for the University of Virginia health system, is skeptical of this meme’s assertion.Dana Hunnes, senior dietitian at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, disagreed slightly.She told us that this type of diet could be sustainable for persons who consumed enough potatoes to support their body weight and muscle mass.In 2010 Chris Voigt, head of the Washington State Potato Commission, promoted the merits of tubers by living off of them for two months.That type of short-term effort, Basbaum said, was unlikely to cause a person much damage provided that they not only had a clean bill of health but also no family history or risk of heart or kidney disease.Taylor posted before-and-after pictures touting his weight loss, but Basbaum did not interpret the results as being fully positive.“I think that’s the makings of a fad, particularly if a celebrity gets caught on to it or if a person has a lot of followers on Facebook or Instagram social media, posting those types of images is very powerful for people.”.For her part, Basbaum said that restricting oneself to that extent gives some dieters a feeling of control because it limits their margin of error.“But at the end of the day, these diets that ask you to either eat only one thing or ask you to eliminate an entire nutrient — take no fat or no carbohydrates at all — they don’t work. .

Could Humans Live Off of Potatoes and Milk?

In Andy Weir's novel The Martian, a stranded Mark Watney must survive on Mars for several months.Since his prepackaged food supplies will run out before he is rescued, Mark grows and only eats potatoes for several weeks.A botanist by trade, our fictional Mark uses Martian soil, his limited water supply, and some self-produced fertilizer to grow his potatoes.They're a great source of potassium, and one single potato has almost half a day's requirement of Vitamin C: 27 milligrams.While potatoes supply three of the most important macro-molecules for life (carbohydrates, protein, and nucleic acid), they miss the fourth: lipids, aka fat.She said potatoes and milk would provide a complete set of protein, but a person would still run short on other nutrients like fiber. .

This Man Ate Only Potatoes for One Year and Lost 117 Pounds

“Make your food boring and your life interesting.” That’s one lesson Andrew Flinders Taylor points out in a Youtube video he posted in December 2016, where he detailed all of the things he learned after eating potatoes for every meal, every single day, for almost a year.An all-potato diet sounds crazy, but for Taylor, who weighed in at 334 pounds when his experiment began, it led to noticeable results."My Spud Fit Challenge was only ever intended as a short term intervention to treat my own food addiction," Taylor said in an interview during November 2019. "."I still include a lot of potatoes, but also plenty of other unprocessed plant foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes," Taylor says.We delved into the nuances of Taylor’s diet, based on the details he dished on his FAQ page, and asked an obesity specialist for his input.He drank mostly water, with the occasional beer thrown in (proof that no man can resist a great brew).For the first month, he didn’t work out at all and still dropped 22 pounds, but then he added 90 minutes of exercise to his routine every day.They’re a great source of fiber and healthy carbs, which can help keep you feeling full, especially if you boil them, says obesity specialist Spencer Nadolsky, D.O., author of .But that’s not exactly surprising, since losing weight typically improves lots of health markers that put you at risk for heart disease.This can tank your energy levels, weaken your immune system, make you feel hungry, and mess with your concentration.I’m sleeping better, I no longer have joint pain from old football injuries, I'm full of energy, I have better mental clarity and focus,” he writes on his site.But that doesn’t mean you won’t experience any negative side effects—like constant fatigue or hunger—especially because the diet itself would be very hard to stick with for most people, says Dr. Nadolsky.If you want to throw potatoes in there as your carb, feel free, but aim to eat a wide variety of vegetables you love.Potatoes can absolutely supplement a healthy diet, which can help you lose weight—but eating nothing but spuds is unnecessarily restrictive, says Dr. Nadolsky.Taylor even notes himself that different things work for different people, so “do your own research and make educated decisions,” he says on his site.This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. .

Can You Live on Sweet Potatoes?

However, sweet potatoes are packed with nutrients, including fiber, copper and carotenoids, precursors of vitamin A found in fruits and vegetables.You may be interested to know that vegetables labeled “yams” are really varieties of sweet potatoes, and all are cousins of morning-glories that come in different colors and textures.You can cook drier types in the microwave (five to 10 minutes on high, depending on size; be sure to prick them first with a fork).Or you can roast them: just peel and cube them, toss in olive oil, salt, and pepper and spread in a baking pan (do not crowd). .

Could I survive on nothing but potatoes and milk?

Before the Great Famine, the traditional Irish peasant meal consisted mainly of potatoes, milk, oats, beans, barley, and bread.As the years grew leaner, dairy products largely disappeared from the Irish diet, since poverty forced many farmers to sell their milk to pay rent.By the time the famine hit, the peasants were eating pretty much just potatoes, supplemented with some salt fish and oatmeal.Edward Wakefield, an English land agent and amateur social scientist who traveled Ireland from 1809 to 1811, calculated each Irish peasant family member consumed 5.5 pounds of potatoes per day.Looking only at vitamins and minerals for which a recommended daily allowance has been established, we find a diet of vitamin-D-fortified whole milk and potatoes stacks up pretty well, providing at least some of all known dietary needs except molybdenum.For example, if you’re an active male between 19 and 30, of average height and weight, then one gallon of milk and eight pounds of potatoes will supply the RDA of most nutrients, falling a little short on the iron, folate, and niacin fronts, missing a lot of vitamin E, and striking out completely on molybdenum.are headache, rapid breathing and heart rate, nausea and vomiting, acute asthma attacks, visual problems, disorientation, and, finally, coma.” However, you don’t need much of the stuff — the RDA is only 45 micrograms — and good sources include lentils, split peas, green beans, cauliflower, and, significantly, oatmeal.Since we have no indication that a third of the Irish population was in a coma prior to 1845, my guess is that reports of potato-only diets in the pre-famine era were exaggerated and that inhabitants of the Emerald Isle were getting sufficient oatmeal and other foods to meet their micronutrient needs.(1) While no sane nutritionist would recommend a diet consisting of just two foods, if in the interest of economy you need to heavy up on a couple, you could do a lot worse than potatoes and milk.Potato historians sing the praises of this miracle tuber for elevating humankind from the constant threat of starvation. .

The Amazing Potato Diet

Before the Great Famine, the traditional Irish peasant meal consisted mainly of potatoes, milk, oats, beans, barley, and bread.As the years grew leaner, dairy products largely disappeared from the Irish diet, since poverty forced many farmers to sell their milk to pay rent.By the time the famine hit, the peasants were eating pretty much just potatoes, supplemented with some salt fish and oatmeal.Edward Wakefield, an English land agent and amateur social scientist who traveled Ireland from 1809 to 1811, calculated each Irish peasant family member consumed 5.5 pounds of potatoes per day.Looking only at vitamins and minerals for which a recommended daily allowance has been established, we find a diet of vitamin-D-fortified whole milk and potatoes stacks up pretty well, providing at least some of all known dietary needs except molybdenum.For example, if you’re an active male between 19 and 30, of average height and weight, then one gallon of milk and eight pounds of potatoes will supply the RDA of most nutrients, falling a little short on the iron, folate, and niacin fronts, missing a lot of vitamin E, and striking out completely on molybdenum.According to one nutritional reference book, “signs of molybdenum deficiency…are headache, rapid breathing and heart rate, nausea and vomiting, acute asthma attacks, visual problems, disorientation, and, finally, coma.” However, you don’t need much of the stuff—the RDA is only 45 micrograms—and good sources include lentils, split peas, green beans, cauliflower, and, significantly, oatmeal.Since we have no indication that a third of the Irish population was in a coma prior to 1845, my guess is that reports of potato-only diets in the pre-famine era were exaggerated and that inhabitants of the Emerald Isle were getting sufficient oatmeal and other foods to meet their micronutrient needs.(1) While no sane nutritionist would recommend a diet consisting of just two foods, if in the interest of economy you need to heavy up on a couple, you could do a lot worse than potatoes and milk. .

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