These homemade mashed potatoes are perfectly rich and creamy, full of great flavor, easy to make, and always a crowd fave.It has come to my attention that in nine years of blogging, I have somehow neglected to share with you my go-to recipe for this most classic of classic side dishes, which simply will not do with Thanksgiving — the ultimate celebration of side dishes — just around the corner.These mashed potatoes are indulgently buttery, creamy, tangy, and made with a subtle hint of garlic (or you’re welcome to add much more, if you’d like).Alright, before we get to the actual recipe, here are a few essential mashed potato tips to always keep in mind:.Some people have a strong preference for starchy Russet potatoes or waxy, buttery Yukon golds.It’s actually a tip I picked up from The New York Times years ago, and I’m convinced that the mixture gives you the best of both worlds.Or maybe the tip should be, don’t multitask too much near the end of the potatoes’ cooking time.As soon as a dinner knife can be inserted easily into a potato with minimal resistance, they’re ready to go.Or maybe the tip should be, don’t multitask too much near the end of the potatoes’ cooking time.As soon as a dinner knife can be inserted easily into a potato with minimal resistance, they’re ready to go.Hold the stockpot handles with oven mitts, and gently shake the pan for about 1 minute to release some of the steam and moisture from the potatoes.Then remove the pan from the heat and set it aside, and your potatoes will be ready to mash Don’t overmix!We will use fine sea salt to season the potatoes both (1) in the water while they are boiling and (2) afterwards, when adding in the butter, milk and cream cheese.It gives you the best of both worlds — starchy and waxy potatoes — and they cook alongside one another beautifully.It gives you the best of both worlds — starchy and waxy potatoes — and they cook alongside one another beautifully.When serving these to a crowd, I like to add just 2-3 cloves to give just a subtle undertone of garlic to the recipe.Be sure that your cream cheese is room temperature and cut into small 1-inch chunks, for easy melting into the potatoes.I always grew up making mashed potatoes with cream cheese and enjoy the slight extra tangy and creaminess that it adds.Be sure that your cream cheese is room temperature and cut into small 1-inch chunks, for easy melting into the potatoes.(If you only have iodized table salt on hand, note that its flavor is different and stronger so you will need to use a bit less.).(If you only have iodized table salt on hand, note that its flavor is different and stronger so you will need to use a bit less.).Toppings (Optional): I like to sprinkle on some chopped chives or green onions, for some extra color and freshness.Then transfer them to a large stockpot full of cold water until all of the potatoes are cut and ready to go.Pro tip : If you are prepping ingredients for a big meal ahead of time, the potatoes can chill in the cold water for up to 4 hours before boiling.Using two oven mitts, carefully hold the handles on the stockpot and shake it gently on the burner for about 1 minute to help cook off some of the remaining steam within the potatoes.Fold each addition in until just combined to avoid overmixing, or else you will end up with gummy potatoes.One final time, adding in extra salt (plus black pepper, if you would like) to taste.To make your mashed potatoes extra garlicky, feel free to double or triple the amount of garlic added to this recipe.You can either store this in the fridge, or just add in a couple of ice cubes every few hours to keep the water cold.If you would like to prep just the raw potatoes ahead of time, they can hold in a stockpot (or large bowl) of cold water for up to 4 hours.You can either store this in the fridge, or just add in a couple of ice cubes every few hours to keep the water cold.Make ahead and refrigerate, then rewarm: If you are cooking your mashed potatoes longer in advance, transfer them to a large bowl and cover with plastic wrap or an airtight lid (leaving at least an inch of space between the surface of the potatoes and the wrap/lid).Crock-Pot: Transfer potatoes to a slow cooker and heat on “high” for 1 hour, covered, or until hot.Instant Pot: Transfer potatoes to a pressure cooker and heat on the “warm” setting for 1 hour, covered, or until hot.Oven: Transfer potatoes to a large stockpot and heat, covered, at 350°F for 30 minutes or until hot.If you are cooking your mashed potatoes longer in advance, transfer them to a large bowl and cover with plastic wrap or an airtight lid (leaving at least an inch of space between the surface of the potatoes and the wrap/lid).Yield: 10 - 12 servings 1 x Print Recipe Pin Recipe Description These homemade mashed potatoes are perfectly rich and creamy, full of great flavor, easy to make, and always a crowd fave.ounces cream cheese, room temperature toppings: chopped fresh chives or green onions, freshly-cracked black pepper Instructions Cut the potatoes.Then cut them into evenly-sized chunks, about an inch or so thick, and transfer them to a large stockpot full of cold water.Reduce heat to medium-high (or whatever temperature is needed to maintain the boil) and continue cooking for about 10-12 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the middle of a potato goes in easily with almost no resistance.Using two oven mitts, carefully hold the handles on the stockpot and shake it gently on the burner for about 1 minute to help cook off some of the remaining steam within the potatoes.Repeat with the remaining butter, and then again with the cream cheese, folding in each addition in until just combined to avoid over-mixing.(Feel free to add in more warm milk to reach your desired consistency, if needed.).One final time, taste the potatoes and season with extra salt if needed. .

Best Potatoes for Mashing

In a large frying pan, poach the haddock in the stock and wine for five minutes. .

Choosing the Best Potatoes For Mashing Depends on Your Mashed

No matter how much melted butter, sour cream, or white pepper you add, if the tubers are gummy or grainy, your dish is a goner.So when you’re shopping for your Thanksgiving, Friendsgiving, or really any occasion that calls for the smoothest, creamiest side dish imaginable, keep an eye out for their bright yellow skins.That buttery flavor will only get boosted when it comes time to add actual butter or cream leading to perfect mashed potatoes in the end.“Yukon Golds also have a tendency to absorb less water than most other potatoes [as they cook], so they don’t run the same risk of getting water-logged or gummy,” Chaey points out.Unlike Yukon Golds, which produce dense, rich scoops of super creamy mashed potatoes, russets turn out pillowy and soft.While many recipes call for russets to be peeled, cubed, and boiled before they’re mashed, we actually prefer a no-boil oven method, which ensures these extra-starchy potatoes don’t take on too much water.Roast the potatoes whole until totally tender, then remove the skin, mash the flesh, and incorporate melted butter and half-and-half (or heavy cream).Careful, though: Overworking cooked russet potatoes (say, by throwing them in a food processor) will release too much starch, turning them into a sticky glom.Passing your boiled spuds through a ricer will reduce them to uniform shreds in seconds—good news for you because spending too much time mashing can lead to gummy results even if you start with the right potatoes.This old-school contraption breaks down potatoes with an efficiency similar to a ricer, but can also be used to make jam, tomato sauce, and all kinds of smooth homogenous things. .

Which Potatoes Are Best for Mashing, Boiling and Baking

There was once a time when I didn’t pay an ounce of attention to what type of potato I was buying.Whether it was mashing, boiling or baking potatoes, I bought only one kind.As I’ve learned more about cooking and baking over the past few years, I realized that just as there are different types of flours for varying recipes, there’s also varieties of potatoes that work best in certain recipes.Don’t get scared off by the idea of choosing the best potatoes for your favorite recipe.It’s really not that difficult to choose the best potatoes and you’ll instantly get better results!These thick-skinned potatoes fall apart while cooking, and whip up fluffy and light.They are a great all-purpose potato and are the types you’ll most commonly find in the grocery store.They are versatile and can be used in almost any dish, whether roasting, grilling, mashing or boiling.This makes them ideal boiling potatoes for salads, soups and stews.From this point, your grocery store may have specifically named types of potatoes such as Red Bliss, Katahdin, Purple Peruvian, Yukon Gold.Boil purple potatoes, but watch them closely because they tend to cook quickly.Many don’t like purple potatoes for fries because the moisture content is high. .

The BEST Mashed Potatoes

No holiday meal would be complete without a big bowl of creamy dreamy mashed potatoes.These are the BEST mashed potatoes, incredibly buttery and creamy, easy to make, and the perfect addition to every meal.I’ve included all of my best tips and a complete “how to make mashed potatoes” guide for absolute perfection every time!Mashed potatoes (and stuffing) are the best part of any Thanksgiving or holiday meal and the perfect side with almost anything!Below I’ve shared my favorite tips and tricks for creamy and fluffy mashed potatoes each and every time.This mashed potatoes recipe is simple so it’s perfect alongside almost anything.They are great on their own and of course, served with turkey and gravy, holiday meals, or just as good ol’ comfort food.If using Yukon gold potatoes, you can leave some of the skin on for a bit of texture.Russet or Idaho potatoes have tough skin that should be peeled first.Seasonings – Again, keeping this recipe simple, I simply add salt & pepper.If you’d like a little bit of garlic, chop a few cloves and let them boil with the potatoes.Mashed Potatoes are super simple to make with very few ingredients.The length of time you need to boil the potatoes depends on how big they are cut.To Heat the Potatoes for Serving Spread them into a greased casserole pan, dot with butter if desired and cover.Garnish with extra butter, chives, herbs or thinly sliced green onions.Scoop them into a plastic freezer bag and press flat (this helps them thaw quickly).They are an easy side dish and go perfectly with Mushroom Salisbury Steak, Crock Pot Pork Chops, and of course a roast turkey! .

How to Make Mashed Potato

The received wisdom is that floury or fluffy varieties such as Maris Piper or King Edward are the best spuds for the job, although the Potato Council suggests the smooth Desiree for velvety mash.Chefs tend to opt for waxy types, which absorb flavour - in the right hands this kind of mashed potato can be elevated to Michelin standard, but doesn’t result in the home-cooked comfort food most of us know and love. .

Perfect Mashed Potatoes Recipe {with Video}

With their high starch and low water content, they're good for baking, for making French fries, and for mashing.Yukon golds make the most perfectly creamy, buttery mashed potatoes.Otherwise, if you start with hot or boiling water, the outsides of the potatoes cook and soften while the middles are still hard and crunchy.Otherwise, if you start with hot or boiling water, the outsides of the potatoes cook and soften while the middles are still hard and crunchy.Our favorite way to reheat mashed potatoes is to just put them in the microwave (covered) for a couple minutes, and then give them a good stir before serving.You can also put them in a slow cooker (a couple hours on low), or reheat in the oven or on the stovetop.Just stir occasionally, and add more butter and seasoning if needed to serve. .

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