The best pumpkins for pie are heirloom culinary varieties with dense, sweet flesh that’s not watery or stringy.Some of the best pumpkin for making pumpkin pie include Fairytale Pumpkins, Jarrahdale Pumpkins, Dickinson Pumpkins, Long Pie Pumpkins, and Red Kuri Squash.Squash: All pumpkins are squash, but not all squash are referred to as “pumpkins”.The Dickinson Pumpkin is a Cucurbita moschata cultivar, along with other pumpkin pie-making favorites like Musquée de Provence (Fairytale Pumpkin), Butternut Squash, and Seminole Pumpkin.The Fairytale Pumpkin is a Cucurbita moschata cultivar, along with other pumpkin pie-making favorites like Dickinson Pumpkin, Butternut Squash and Seminole Pumpkin.These pumpkins are elongated (about 12″ long and 5″ wide), and weigh about 4 pounds each when ripe.Long Pie Pumpkins have thick orange flesh that makes an absolutely decadent pumpkin purée.The Long Pie Pumpkin is a Cucurbita pepo cultivar, like the Winter Luxury Pumpkin.Jarrahdale Pumpkin is an heirloom cooking pumpkin considered to be one of the best pumpkins for making pumpkin pie filling.Red Kuri Squash is a Japanese heirloom squash that makes delicious, bright orange, rich and flavorful pumpkin pies.These squash make pumpkin pies that look just as good as they taste!Red Kuri Squash is a Cucurbita maxima cultivar, along with other pumpkin pie-making favorites like Jarrahdale Pumpkin, Kabocha Pumpkin, and Hubbard Squash.Seminole Pumpkins make a smooth and sweet pumpkin pie filling with a deep orange color.The Seminole Pumpkin is a Cucurbita moschata cultivar, along with other pumpkin pie-making favorites like Musquée de Provence (Fairytale Pumpkins), Butternut Squash and Dickinson Pie Pumpkin.Zucchino Rampicante Squash is an Italian heirloom squash with tender flesh and sweet, delicious taste.Zucchino Rampicante Squash have a subtle, sweet taste when used to make pumpkin pie filling.The Zucchino Rampicante Squash is a Cucurbita moschata cultivar, along with other pumpkin pie-making favorites like Musquée de Provence (Fairytale Pumpkins), Butternut Squash and Dickinson Pie Pumpkin.Kabocha Pumpkins have moderately sweet, fine-textured flesh that makes an excellent, thick pie filling.Buttercup Squash is a Cucurbita maxima cultivar, along with other blue/green colored pumpkin pie-making favorites like Jarrahdale Pumpkin, Kabocha Pumpkin, and Hubbard Squash.Butternut Squash, known as Butternut Pumpkin (or Gramma) in Australia and New Zealand, is a commonly-available winter squash that makes excellent pumpkin pie filling.Butternut Squash is a Cucurbita moschata cultivar, along with other tan/yellow-colored pumpkin pie-making favorites like Dickinson Pumpkin, Fairytale Pumpkin, and Seminole Pumpkin.The Black Futsu Pumpkin is a Cucurbita moschata cultivar, along with other pumpkin pie-making favorites like Dickinson Pumpkin, Fairytale Pumpkin, and Seminole Pumpkin.The flesh is very flavorful, smooth, and sweet.The Galeux d’Eysines Pumpkin is a Cucurbita maxima cultivar, along with other pumpkin pie-making favorites like Jarrahdale Pumpkin, Kabocha Pumpkin, and Hubbard Squash.Winter Luxury makes a thick pur ée with a sweet flavor and a silky smooth texture.The Winter Luxury Pumpkin is a Cucurbita pepo cultivar, like the Long Pie Pumpkin.The Long Island Cheese Pumpkin is a Cucurbita moschata cultivar, along with other pumpkin pie-making favorites like Dickinson Pumpkin, Fairytale Pumpkin, and Seminole Pumpkin.Hubbard Squash is a large, teardrop shaped heirloom squash that is known for its excellent cooking characteristics.These big fruits have grey-green-blue bumpy skin and weigh 15-20 pounds when ripe (if not more!Hubbard Squash are a Cucurbita maxima cultivar, along with other pumpkin pie-making favorites like Jarrahdale Pumpkin, Kabocha Pumpkin, and Galeux d’Eysines Pumpkin.Marina Di Chioggia is an excellent cooking pumpkin, making a purée with a deep, dark orange color.The Marina Di Chioggia Pumpkin is a Cucurbita maxima cultivar, along with other pumpkin pie-making favorites like Jarrahdale Pumpkin, Kabocha Pumpkin, and Hubbard Squash.This big yellow pumpkins typically weigh 40-50 pounds, but can grow to reach over 100 pounds in good conditions.The flesh is bright orange and is sufficiently dense and flavorful to make an heirloom-quality pie filling.The Queensland Blue Pumpkin is a Cucurbita maxima cultivar, along with other pumpkin pie-making favorites like Jarrahdale Pumpkin, Kabocha Pumpkin, and Hubbard Squash.Tokyo Blue Squash are known for their incredibly smooth texture and sweet taste in pumpkin purée.Flat White Boer Pumpkins have sweet orange flesh that makes a great pie filling.While not as flavorful as some other old-fashioned varieties, these pumpkins still make a smooth and delicious pumpkin pie.Pie Pumpkins!These pumpkins weigh about 20-30 pounds, and are known for their brightly colored rind and classic flattened heirloom pumpkin shape.Cinderella pumpkins have dense bright flesh perfect for baking in pies.The Cinderella Pumpkin is a Cucurbita maxima cultivar, along with other pumpkin pie-making favorites like Jarrahdale Pumpkin, Kabocha Pumpkin, and Queensland Blue Pumpkin.Amish Pie Squash is a Cucurbita maxima cultivar, along with other large-sized pumpkin pie-making favorites like Jarrahdale Pumpkin, Cinderella Pumpkin, and Queensland Blue Pumpkin.Porcelain Doll Pumpkins make a smooth, deep orange pumpkin purée.Porcelain Doll is a Cucurbita maxima cultivar, along with other big pumpkin pie-making favorites like Jarrahdale Pumpkin, Cinderella Pumpkin, and Queensland Blue Pumpkin. .

How to Make a Pumpkin Pie With Fresh Pumpkin

The stuffing was always made with rice, Italian sausage, and pancetta.My mom, an adventurous home cook, had a few blind spots in her repertoire, pumpkin pie being the worst of the lot.The convenience of canned pumpkin made the pie an afterthought—and it tasted like one, too.I just hate canned pumpkin pie.This pumpkin gets its name from its squat shape and tan-colored skin, which makes it look like a wheel of cheese. .

Perfect Pumpkin Pie

This recipe promises a tender, flaky crust and gently spiced pumpkin filling that won’t crack as it cools.Over the years, I’ve tested at least a dozen recipes, and each one was plagued with either a filling that wouldn’t set properly, a massive crack down the center, or a lousy crust (i.e., soggy, doughy or shrunken).Finally, pumpkin pie filling is a custard, which means you have to remove it from the oven while it’s still a little jiggly, which makes it difficult to gauge doneness.For this foolproof recipe, I use my favorite homemade pie crust, which tastes buttery, holds its shape, and is easy to work with.The result is a pristine pumpkin pie, even if you accidentally leave it in the oven a few minutes too long, and it’s delicious to boot!Remove the pie crust from the refrigerator and place it on a baking sheet (this makes it easy to move in and out of the oven).Cover the crust with a piece of parchment paper and fill it about three-quarters full with dried beans or pie weights.Don’t worry if the bottom puffs up; just press it down gently with a flat spatula, such as a pancake turner, taking care not to puncture it. .

Homemade Pumpkin Pie

How to Tell When Pumpkin Pie Is Done.You can either use pumpkin purée from a can, or make your own pumpkin purée by cooking a sugar pumpkin.Canned pumpkin purée will give you a consistently good result in your pumpkin pie.My friend Suzanne and I performed an experiment with her family to find out which pie tasted better, the one with canned pumpkin or the one made with puréed roasted sugar pumpkin.To make pumpkin purée from scratch, cut a medium-small sugar pumpkin in half.Just pour the pumpkin pie filling into an unbaked chilled or frozen pie crust, and bake it in the oven.How to Tell When Pumpkin Pie Is Done.This pie cooks for a little over an hour, first at 425°F and then at 350°F.1:00 Pumpkin Pie.Pumpkin pie is one of those pies you can easily make a day or two ahead.You can make both the crust and the filling in advance, refrigerate them separately, and then bake them the day of. .

Finding the Best Pumpkins for Pies

A sweetly spiced aroma wafted through the room while condensation glistened atop the baked custard.Freshly whipped cream with speckles of black vanilla bean mounded high in an earthenware bowl.Like most of my homesteading adventures, the quest for the perfect pumpkin pie began in my garden.So I grabbed the first seed packet labeled “pumpkin” from the dollar store shelf and planted.Then I cut the ripe fruit, roasted it and pureed loose, watery, bitter flesh into something that looked nothing like the deeply hued selections in commercial cans.After cutting the top off, scooping out the guts, and roasting the fruit, I tasted the cooked flesh.But it was denser than the jack o’ lantern flesh so, after draining it in a colander for over an hour, I made bread.I attribute the bread’s deliciousness to brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves … all the luscious seasonings that gave my creation its true flavor.How could I turn my garden pumpkins into the sweet, dense purée offered in the cans?It was while I researched that story that I realized people in Australia and New Zealand use the word “pumpkin” for all winter squash.Holly showed pictures of the most common Kent pumpkin, a round and squat fruit with thick orange flesh and a small seed cavity.At that point, Michael spoke up and identified the photo of the “Kent pumpkin” as the type he eats in China.They’re so popular, due to American traditions, that we’ve come to accept those as the standard “pumpkin.” The term has become synonymous with round, ribbed fruits and cavernous seed hollows.Though pumpkins are native to North America, their introduction to Tudor England made them a popular pie filler.Pumpkin pie recipes are found in English cookbooks written as early as 1675.The Pilgrims carried the concept of pumpkin pie back to New England with them while the English took squash recipes in a different direction.Nick Johns, living in the United Kingdom, claims that in his first 20 years, jack o’ lanterns were only seen on TV and recently became popular when trick-or-treating overshadowed Britain’s autumn holiday of Bonfire Night.Nick says even butternut squash recently gained popularity due to the rise of celebrity chef shows.Pretty pictures and marketing often dismiss sweet potato pie, which is a cheaper and more available filling in the southern United States, but more difficult to grow up north.Jack o’ lanterns can make pies, if you roast the flesh then drain it long enough.Cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice and ginger give pumpkin pie its traditional flavor.Pie #1 was prettiest, a brilliant orange from the Castilla squash I’d purchased at the Hispanic market.With small seed cavities and undeniable sweetness, Castilla squash have stringy crimson flesh, which must be pureed for the best texture.Other names include tromboncino or zucchetta rampicante, and they’re often eaten young as a summer squash.Seeds only form within the swelling at the end, leaving one to three feet of neck that can be peeled, diced, roasted, or made into pies.The best pumpkin pie recipe calls for the sweetest, densest winter squash.Grow buttercup or Musque de Provence within your garden or purchase butternut at the grocery store.Give zucchino rampicante a try or cultivate unique squash like Galeux D’eysines or Marina Di Chioggia, which get their warts from sugars seeping through the skin.Make sure squash are fully ripe before roasting, draining and crafting into your perfect pie.Instead of peeling and cubing the squash, simply stab it with a knife and set it on a cookie sheet.Lower your oven rack until the pumpkin fits then bake at 400°F until a knife can easily insert through the sides.For a more distinguished flavor, substitute evaporated goat milk for the heavy cream or use 1 and ¼ cups honey instead of sugar.Set both plate and sheet onto the middle rack of the oven and carefully pour the pumpkin custard into the crust.Then turn the oven down to 350°F and bake another 45-60 minutes, until a metal fork inserted into the middle comes out clean. .

Best Pumpkin Puree Recipe

Just kidding on the Harold thing; we actually bought a fresh turkey.But we did have a pretty pure Thanksgiving dinner , capped off by the most delicious pumpkin pie I’d ever tasted—made especially scrumptious by pumpkin puree that she and I made ourselves.I’ve been pureeing my own pumpkin ever since.It’s around this time of year that I start storing up pumpkin puree in my freezer, in approximately one-cup quantities.Aside from the obvious use in pumpkin pie, it comes in handy for pumpkin bread, pumpkin muffins, pumpkin dip, pumpkin smoothies, pumpkin cookies, pumpkin butter…I even mix the puree with butter and maple syrup for a ridiculously sinful fall side dish.And don’t even get me started on how good it is for you.I don’t even need to tell you; just look at the color and you’ll be a believer.Substitute homemade for the stuff in the can.(Though the first time my mother-in-law and I pureed pumpkin, we used a big motherin’ thing and it turned out just fine.).I’m sorry, guys…but you’re a part of the food chain.And while I don’t necessarily subscribe to the exact same set of values vegetarians do, I do understand where they’re coming from.Place pumpkin pieces on a baking sheet (face up or face down; I’ve done both) and roast in a 350-degree oven for 45 minutes, or until pumpkin is fork-tender.And that makes it pretty easy to remove the skin from the pumpkin pieces.Sometimes I use a knife and scrape the “meat” from the skin as I peel it back.And puree away!Here’s how I store my pumpkin:.I spoon about 1 cupful of pumpkin into each bag; that way, I know exactly how much I’m getting when I pull a bag out of the freezer.IT’S A GOOD THING I HAD YOU FOLD THOSE SIDES DOWN SO YOU WOULDN’T GET PUMPKIN ALL OVER THE INSIDE OF THE BAG, HUH?Don’t tell the freezer police. .

Perfect Pumpkin Pie Recipe

Then, pour the mixture out into another bowl, and let it cool a bit before adding the condensed milk and eggs.My family loves this recipe, and I use a ready-made graham cracker crust, so easy and so good!If you take it out onto the kitchen counter, the filling sometimes cracks because of the cold air.A very sweet pie, nice appearance, and make sure to top it off with whipped cream.Tips: I did not use the ginger nor the nutmeg; instead I added 2 teaspoons of "McCormik's Pumpkin Pie Spice" (which includes: Cinnamon, Ginger, Nutmeg, and Allspice), along with the 1 teaspoon of cinnamon.I want to make and eat pumpkin pie breakfast ...lunch...and dinner !!!Also, if you are using a homemade pie crust, I recommend you bake it a tad before adding the filling.Stick with the other reviewers tips and us 2 teaspoons of McCormick's Pumkin spice instead of ginger and nutmeg, I also added one teaspoon of cinnamon and warmed up the spices and pumkin on the stove on low heat, cooling than adding the eggs and sweetened milk, it really made the spices meld together great like the other reviewer said to do.**TIP**- Where it says bake 35-40 minutes at 350 degrees....take my advice and try this- bake it at 350 degrees (after you've done step 1 on directions of course) Bake it at 350 degrees for 35 minutes, than turn off your oven and set your timer for 5 minutes while you let the pie sit in there, this way it will still cook for an additional few minutes while the oven is off but still hot and this way the oven will cool enough so that you can let the pie cool off on the top rack the remainder of the time.Doing this will prevent the pie from cracking when it hits the cool air of the counter when it's still very warm.I topped it off with cool wip and graham cracker crumbs, great texture....Thanks EAGLE BRAND!!!I use one and a half 14 oz cans of condensed milk (I love that sweet, rich flavor - the extra condensed milk really adds an outstanding richness to this) instead of just one can, and 3 medium eggs (to compensate for the extra liquid).Tenting with aluminum foil while baking prevents the crust from getting burnt, and letting the pie cool in the oven ensures that the top does not sink and that the center is cooked.This pie tastes best when made a day ahead and refrigerated overnight - this gives the flavors a chance to blend. .

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