The first recorded pumpkin grown in Kentucky was planted in Richmond, Kentucky, in the 1700s, reports the University of Kentucky.The first recorded pumpkin grown in Kentucky was planted in Richmond, Kentucky, in the 1700s, reports the University of Kentucky.Water the mound once a day, using enough water to moisten the soil to a depth of 4 to 6 inches.Water the mound once a day, using enough water to moisten the soil to a depth of 4 to 6 inches.Thin out the pumpkin mound once the seedlings have grown three to four leaves. .

Planting Calendar for Louisville, KY

Our planting calendar is customized to your nearest weather station in order to give you the most accurate information possible.Average frost dates are based on historical weather data and are the planting guideline used by most gardeners.Although frost dates are a good way to know approximately when to start gardening, always check a local forecast before planting outdoors!Although frost dates are a good way to know approximately when to start gardening, always check a local forecast before planting outdoors!Starting seeds indoors also provides young, tender plants a chance to grow in a stable, controlled environment.Outdoors, the unpredictability of rain, drought, frost, low and high temperatures, sunlight, and pests and diseases can take a toll on young plants, especially when they're just getting started.Indoors, you can control these elements to maximize your plants' early growth and give them the best shot at thriving when they are eventually transplanted outdoors.This gives the plants plenty of time to grow large and healthy enough to survive their eventual transplanting to the garden.These include tender vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant, as well as crops with a long growing season, like broccoli, cauliflower, and brussels sprouts.Planting in late summer for a fall harvest has many benefits (soil is already warm, temperatures are cooler, fewer pests).Warm-weather veggies like beans, corn, squashes, pumpkins, cucumbers, cantaloupe, and watermelons are all sown directly into the ground.Cole crops like broccoli, cauliflower, kale, and cabbage could be direct seeded, but because of the heat of mid- and late summer, it's better to start them indoors and then transplant them into the garden.If it's not yet warm enough to plant outdoors, transplant the seedlings to larger plastic or peat pots indoors and continue care.If outdoor conditions allow, start hardening off your seedlings approximately one week before your last frost date, then transplant them into the garden.Plant annual flowers and vegetables that bear crops above ground during the light, or waxing, of the Moon. .

Planting Calendar for Lexington, KY

Our planting calendar is customized to your nearest weather station in order to give you the most accurate information possible.Average frost dates are based on historical weather data and are the planting guideline used by most gardeners.Although frost dates are a good way to know approximately when to start gardening, always check a local forecast before planting outdoors!Although frost dates are a good way to know approximately when to start gardening, always check a local forecast before planting outdoors!Starting seeds indoors also provides young, tender plants a chance to grow in a stable, controlled environment.Outdoors, the unpredictability of rain, drought, frost, low and high temperatures, sunlight, and pests and diseases can take a toll on young plants, especially when they're just getting started.Indoors, you can control these elements to maximize your plants' early growth and give them the best shot at thriving when they are eventually transplanted outdoors.This gives the plants plenty of time to grow large and healthy enough to survive their eventual transplanting to the garden.These include tender vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant, as well as crops with a long growing season, like broccoli, cauliflower, and brussels sprouts.Planting in late summer for a fall harvest has many benefits (soil is already warm, temperatures are cooler, fewer pests).Warm-weather veggies like beans, corn, squashes, pumpkins, cucumbers, cantaloupe, and watermelons are all sown directly into the ground.Cole crops like broccoli, cauliflower, kale, and cabbage could be direct seeded, but because of the heat of mid- and late summer, it's better to start them indoors and then transplant them into the garden.If it's not yet warm enough to plant outdoors, transplant the seedlings to larger plastic or peat pots indoors and continue care.If outdoor conditions allow, start hardening off your seedlings approximately one week before your last frost date, then transplant them into the garden.Plant annual flowers and vegetables that bear crops above ground during the light, or waxing, of the Moon. .

How to Grow Pumpkins

Start with quality seed and you will have a better chance of growing quality pumpkins, Southern States® has a wide range of good quality pumpkin seed and varieties.Soil.To prepare a soil bed for pumpkins, select the size of area you are going to prepare (bearing in mind pumpkin plants will need a good deal of space, vines can run 25 feet or more) and dig down two to three feet and then backfill with a rich compost and manure mix.Planting.Commonly you will be mounding your soil two inches or so above the bed, follow the seeding directions on your seed packet.You may also want to start your seeds off in a pot in a suitable growing medium and grow your seedlings before planting out in the garden.Your plant will need plenty of light and watering every other day (do not soak the soil).Growing.Squash beetles.Around eight to ten weeks after planting your pumpkin plants should start to flower.As fruit begins to develop you may want to select certain pumpkins for pruning to concentrate on better fruits; wait until your pumpkins are grapefruit size before pruning. .

Pumpkin Seeds - Kentucky Field

Plan on needing a minimum of 20 square feet for each plant – this can be found on the edge of the garden where the vines can trail down, or in an unconventional spot in your yard that has ample space.When the soil is dry and the plant looks limp, give it a long deep drink.As your Pumpkins start to grow, separate the fruit from the ground with a piece of cardboard to prevent possible rot.Keep your pumpkin in the sun and remove any leaves that are shading the fruit.Keep in the sun for 2 weeks to harden the skin and protect it from colder nights by bringing it inside or covering it with a blanket. .

Kentucky state record for heaviest pumpkin broken in Meade County

Massive pumpkin breaks Kentucky state record at Meade County event.This year's event was held at the Roberts Family Farm in Guston.The event draws growers "from up to 8 states," organizers said, and there's more than bragging rights and records on the line.Mary Ramsey is a breaking news reporter for The Courier Journal. .

The Best Crops to Grow in Ohio and Kentucky

Ever wonder what grows best in Ohio and Kentucky gardens?Learn the best crops to grow in Ohio and in Kentucky so you can begin eating better, fresher food.What to grow in Ohio.The best vegetables to grow in Ohio are crops that survive hard winters.Swiss chard, beans, cucumbers, pumpkins, squash, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant and okra do well in Ohio’s warmer soil temperatures of 50 to 75 degrees.If you live in Ohio, plant vegetables such as corn, peppers, eggplant, beans and tomatoes in the late spring and early summer.Wait until the soil temperature is at least 60 degrees Fahrenheit before planting cucumbers, squash, pumpkins and beans.What to grow in Kentucky.Most of Kentucky is Zone 6.That includes peppers, squash, sweet corn and tomatoes.In August, start planting fall vegetables such as beets, lettuce, spinach and turnips.Because different vegetables and fruit bushes need planting at different times, consider that when designing your garden.It’s worth it to plant a vegetable and fruit garden. .

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