This leafy green vegetable grows all year round and is packed with vitamins and minerals.Spinach is an excellent source of lutein, an antioxidant known to protect against age-related eye diseases such as macular degeneration and cataracts.Studies have found that people who take lutein supplements are at a lower risk for macular degeneration, which is the leading cause of vision impairment and blindness.One study found that women who had a higher dietary intake of lutein were 23% less likely to develop cataracts than those who had a low-lutein diet.Studies of older adults have shown that those with higher lutein levels exhibited better verbal fluency, memory, reasoning ability, and processing speed than those with low amounts of the nutrient.Eating just one cup of spinach fulfills the recommended daily amount of Vitamin K your body needs. .

Top 5 health benefits of spinach

Spinach belongs to the chenopodiaceae family (also known as goosefoot), which includes beetroot, chard and quinoa .It shares a similar taste profile with these vegetables – the bitterness of beet greens and the slightly salty flavour of chard.The dark green colour of spinach leaves indicates they contain high levels of chlorophyll and health-promoting carotenoids including beta carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin.As well as being anti-inflammatory and anti-cancerous, these phytonutrients are especially important for healthy eye sight, helping to prevent macular degeneration and cataracts.Spinach has long been regarded as a plant which can restore energy, increase vitality and improve the quality of the blood.This mineral plays a central role in the function of red blood cells which help transport oxygen around the body, supports energy production and DNA synthesis.However, high levels of a compound called oxalic acid, naturally found in spinach, appears to inhibit the absorption of minerals like iron; that said, lightly cooking or wilting appears to minimise these effects.A reduction in blood pressure helps reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke.Animal studies suggest including spinach in the diet may protect against colon cancer.Spinach contains a high amount of oxalate, for this reason people with a history of oxalate-containing kidney stones should minimise their consumption.All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other healthcare professional. .

Spinach 101: Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is a leafy green vegetable that originated in Persia.Also known as folate or vitamin B9, this compound is vital for pregnant women and essential for normal cellular function and tissue growth.Also known as folate or vitamin B9, this compound is vital for pregnant women and essential for normal cellular function and tissue growth.This mineral is essential for bone health and a crucial signaling molecule for your nervous system, heart, and muscles.SUMMARY Spinach boasts many plant compounds that can improve health, such as lutein, kaempferol, nitrates, quercetin, and zeaxanthin.They can cause oxidative stress, which triggers accelerated aging and increases your risk of cancer and diabetes ( 11 ).However, spinach contains antioxidants, which fight oxidative stress and help reduce the damage it causes.One study in eight healthy people found that spinach helped prevent oxidative damage.Eye health Spinach is rich in zeaxanthin and lutein, which are the carotenoids responsible for color in some vegetables.Additionally, several studies indicate that zeaxanthin and lutein work to prevent macular degeneration and cataracts, which are major causes of blindness ( 16 , 17 , 18 , 19 ).Several human studies link spinach consumption to a reduced risk of prostate cancer.Likewise, one animal study notes that spinach might suppress cancer formation ( 26 ).Additionally, spinach packs high amounts of antioxidants, which may also fight cancer ( 27 ).One study in 27 people found that eating spinach effectively lowered blood pressure levels.Several other studies observed similar effects, indicating that spinach boosts heart health ( 7 , 30 , 31 ).It may reduce oxidative stress, promote eye health, fight cancer, and regulate blood pressure.People who are taking blood thinners, such as warfarin, should consult with their healthcare practitioner before eating large amounts of spinach ( 34 ).This leafy green is also very high in vitamin K1, which can be a problem for people on blood thinners. .

Spinach: Health Benefits, Nutrition Facts (& Popeye)

While this leafy green won’t cause your biceps to inflate like balloons, it is dense in vitamins and minerals, low in calories and versatile in cooking.Spinach may also help with several health conditions, according to Megan Ware, a registered dietitian nutritionist based in Orlando, Florida.“Eating spinach is beneficial for maintaining healthy skin, hair and strong bones, as well as helping with digestion, lowering the risk for heart disease and improving blood glucose control in diabetics,” she told Live Science.According to BBC Good Food, use of the word “Florentine” to describe a dish with spinach can likely be traced to Catherine de Medici, the Italian wife of France’s Henry II.Spinach is a member of the Chenopodiaceae family, which also contains nutritionally powerful foods like beets and Swiss chard, according to Purdue University.Ware said, “Spinach is one of the best sources of dietary potassium and magnesium, two very important electrolytes necessary for maintaining human health.Another study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 1999 found that low intakes of vitamin K were associated with an increased risk of hip fractures in middle-aged women.Eating iron-rich foods is important for those suffering from or at risk of anemia, and with 36 percent of your daily iron needs per cooked cup, spinach is a good option.According to the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, vitamin A is a compound in retinoids, which are popular in anti-aging skin treatments.A review of anti-cancer diet research published in Nutrition Journal explained that this is because chorophyll helps bind together hydrocarbons, aflatoxins and other hydrophobic molecules that may be associated with cancer and expels them.One study published in the Journal of Nutrition looked at 15 kinds of carotenoids to see if they combatted cancer cells and found only neoxanthin from spinach and fucoxanthin from brown algae to be significantly effective.“Spinach contains a powerful antioxidant known as alpha-lipoic acid, which has been shown to lower blood sugar levels and increase insulin sensitivity and decrease peripheral neuropathy [weakness or numbness in the hands or feet] in patients with diabetes,” said Ware.The University of Maryland Medical Center notes that much of the research has been done with intravaneous alpha-lipoic acid, however, so it’s less clear that consuming the antioxidant by mouth has the same results.One 2006 study published in Diabetes Care found that consuming 600 mg of alpha-lipoic acid by mouth every day for five weeks improved neuropathic symptoms, such as stabbing and burning pain, numbness in feet and paresthesia (a tingling or itching sensation), more than a placebo.One study of 12,000 adults, published in Archives of Internal Medicine, showed that those who consumed 4,069 mg of potassium each day lowered their risk of cardiovascular disease and ischemic heart disease (characterized by reduced blood flow to the heart) by 37 percent and 49 percent, respectively, compared to those who took 1,793 mg per day.There are also suggestions that vitamin K might reduce the risk of heart disease because without it, mechanisms that stop the formation of blood vessel calcification may become inactive.Studies are still inconclusive, however, and one review of them, published in Advances in Nutrition, suggested that future research should focus specifically on vitamin-K deficient patients.Folic acid can help prevent neural tube defects—specifically spina bifida and anencephaly—that occur early in pregnancy.But spinach can also help increase your folic acid intake, with 66 percent of your daily (pre-pregnancy) folate needs per cooked cup.Spinach is a good source of carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, which are associated with helping to prevent age-related macular degeneration and cataracts.According to The Scripps Research Institute, studies have shown that those who ate spinach three times per week had a 43 percent lower risk of developing macular degeneration.“It is important that you maintain a consistent intake of foods containing vitamin K (like spinach), which play a large role in blood clotting.”.Sautee spinach in a small amount of extra virgin olive oil and season with ground black pepper and freshly grated Parmesan cheese.Popeye the Sailor Man made his debut in 1929 in a comic strip called "Thimble Theatre" and jumped to animated cartoons in 1933.According to Comics Kingdom, he was a "good guy underdog with bulging forearms, a mean uppercut and a penchant for canned spinach.".Segar, for their positive influence on America’s eating habits, making Popeye the first cartoon character ever immortalized in public sculpture. .

Spinach: Nutrition, health benefits, and diet

This article explores the nutrition contained in spinach, how it can benefit the body, and a range of flavorsome ways to include this in the diet.The possible health benefits of consuming spinach include improving blood glucose control in people with diabetes , lowering the risk of cancer , and improving bone health, as well as supplying minerals and vitamins that can provide a range of different.Dark, leafy greens like spinach are important for skin, hair, and bone health.Make sure to combine vitamin-C-rich foods such as citrus fruits with plant iron like spinach to improve absorption.Spinach contains an antioxidant known as alpha-lipoic acid, which has been shown to lower glucose levels, increase insulin sensitivity, and prevent oxidative, stress-induced changes in patients with diabetes.However, most studies have used intravenous alpha-lipoic acid, and it is uncertain whether oral supplementation would elicit the same benefits.Adequate vitamin K consumption is important for good health, as it acts as a modifier of bone matrix proteins, improves calcium absorption, and may reduce the amount of calcium that leaves the body in urine.Spinach is high in fiber and water, both of which help to prevent constipation and promote a healthy digestive tract.Spinach and other leafy greens high in vitamin C are crucial for the building and maintenance of collagen, which provides structure to skin and hair. .

Is Eating Spinach Every Day Good for You? Health Benefits

Oxalic acid present in spinach binds with zinc, magnesium, and calcium because of which the body does not absorb enough nutrients, which may lead to a mineral deficiency.A high purine content of spinach may also aggravate gout or gouty arthritis and lead to joint pain, swelling, and inflammation.Spinach is very high in vitamin K, and this nutrient may react with the anticoagulant drug and significantly affect its action and effect on other coagulating factors present in the blood.Spinach is high in fiber and takes time to get digested, which may further lead to diarrhea, abdominal pain, and sometimes fever. .

What Does Spinach Do to the Body? 8 Health Benefits

Rich with a multitude of essential vitamins, minerals, and nutrients, spinach is a well-known low-calorie ingredient used in many different types of diets. .

Kale vs. spinach: Health benefits, nutrition, and more

Kale and spinach are dark leafy greens that offer an abundance of vitamins, as well as potentially beneficial plant phytochemicals.People comparing kale with spinach will find that both offer health benefits and also carry some risks.A 2019 study suggests that a diet high in fiber can lower heart disease risk in people with high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes.Like kale, spinach is rich in phytochemicals and bioactives, which have a long history in alternative and traditional healing.The thylakoids and glycolipids in spinach may lower the risk of cancer and obesity, and support better blood sugar control.Spinach contains more than double the amount of folate as kale, making it an ideal food during pregnancy.It also offers a wide variety of antioxidants, potentially helping lower the risk of heart disease and age-related cellular damage.In 2006 , researchers traced about 80% of E. coli cases in a major outbreak to contaminated spinach.In a 2013 analysis , 6.6% of farmed spinach samples tested positive for the bacteria.Similar foods Kale and spinach are a healthier alternative to less nutritionally dense, high-water lettuces such as iceberg and romaine. .

6 Health Benefits of Spinach, According to a Nutritionist

In a study published in the journal Food & Function, researchers summarize the protective effects of spinach, based on the activity of its naturally occurring phytochemicals and bioactive compounds.For these reasons, the researchers conclude that eating more spinach may help fend off heart disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and obesity.The spinach drink, in addition to those made from beetroot juice and rocket salad (another leafy green), also lowered blood pressure.One of the antioxidants in spinach, called lutein, has been shown to reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), an eye disease that can blur the sharp, central vision required for activities like reading and driving.In one Japanese study, researchers examined the eyes of 11 healthy nonsmokers who consumed 75 grams of frozen spinach containing 10 mg of lutein daily for two months.That’s important, because macular pigment acts like internal sunglasses to protect the eyes, and low or decreased MPOD is a risk factor for AMD.Scientists say the best way to consume spinach for maximum lutein intake may be in a smoothie combined with a healthful fat, such as avocado or almond butter.That’s because when spinach is chopped into small pieces, more lutein is released from the leaves, and fat increases the ability to absorb the antioxidant.Older research found that cooking also impacts the folate content of spinach; boiling slashed this B vitamin level by nearly half.A recent study looked at the effect of different cooking methods on the vitamin content in selected vegetables, included spinach.For a quick and easy side dish, toss spinach with a simple vinaigrette made from whisking together extra virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar, Dijon mustard, and dried Italian herb seasoning.Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, is Health's contributing nutrition editor, a New York Times best-selling author, and a private practice performance nutritionist who has consulted for five professional sports teams. .

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