—Ginger Ellsworth, Caldwell, Idaho Go to Recipe This pretty spinach salad, topped with grilled chicken, strawberries and almonds, features a delectably sweet poppy seed dressing.—Betty Lise Anderson, Gahanna, Ohio Go to Recipe Nature's candy abounds in the berry-filled salad.Turkey Spinach Salad with Maple Dressing "My husband and I love to hike in New England," writes Jessica Gerschitz of Jericho, New York.Go to Recipe "My husband and I love to hike in New England," writes Jessica Gerschitz of Jericho, New York.—Karen Schlyter, Calgary, Alberta Go to Recipe This spinach salad is really healthy and super fast.—Jenny Lynch, Rock Island, Illinois Go to Recipe My family loves pasta salads, but usually they have too much mayonnaise or oily dressing.—Virginia Dack, Asheville, North Carolina Go to Recipe The combination of sweet fruit and salty feta cheese makes this salad a winner.Then, trim an inch from the base of the squash, making it stand up straight and tall while you run the peeler from top to bottom.—Margee Berry, White Salmon, Washington Go to Recipe Make quick work of peeling butternut squash.Then, trim an inch from the base of the squash, making it stand up straight and tall while you run the peeler from top to bottom.—Taste of Home Test Kitchen Go to Recipe This warm, hearty spinach and bacon salad offers comfort at any meal.—Mary Lou Timpson, Colorado City, Arizona Go to Recipe This lightly dressed salad is packed with superfoods!Taste of Home Chinese Spinach-Almond Salad This recipe combines power-packed spinach, a good source of vitamins A and K, with other veggies, lean meat and crunchy, heart-healthy almonds.Asparagus Spinach Salad with Chicken We love all the fresh fruits and vegetables that are available in the summer.This salad is one of our favorite because it packs in so much great produce, plus it's quick and easy on a warm summer day.—Joan Hallford, North Richland Hills, Texas Go to Recipe We love all the fresh fruits and vegetables that are available in the summer.This salad is one of our favorite because it packs in so much great produce, plus it's quick and easy on a warm summer day.—Zita Wilensky, North Miami Beach, Florida Go to Recipe People always enjoy the bold flavors in this delightful salad.This version with tender couscous is amped up by the bright flavors of oranges, cranberries, basil and a touch of fennel.—Kristen Heigl, Staten Island, New York Go to Recipe I often create salads for summer using a variety of healthy, filling grains.This version with tender couscous is amped up by the bright flavors of oranges, cranberries, basil and a touch of fennel.—Marla Clark, Albuquerque, New Mexico Go to Recipe My steak salad with avocado and radishes is a big plate of summer deliciousness.—Emily Jamison, Champaign, Illinois Go to Recipe The sparkling pomegranate gems make this salad irresistibly beautiful.—Denise Albers, Freeburg, Illinois Go to Recipe With a light sweet-tangy dressing, the spinach doesn’t wilt and the apples retain their crunch.—Robert Aucelluzzo, Simi Valley, California Go to Recipe I created a bright spinach salad with raspberries for a big family dinner.—Julie Kirkpatrick, Billings, Montana Go to Recipe With pasta salad, it’s easy to change up ingredients.Heirloom Tomato Spinach Salad This is a simple yet elegant dish that always pleases my guests.—Marjorie Au, Honolulu, Hawaii Go to Recipe Summer's the perfect time to toss up this watermelon salad.—Rebekah Radewahn, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin Go to Recipe Juicy berries, crisp sugar snap peas and crunchy pecans complement the lime-marinated chicken in this pretty salad.—Mary M. Leverette, Columbia, South Carolina Go to Recipe This is my favorite lunch dish during the fall season.—Renata Smith, Brookline, Massachusetts Go to Recipe You can also transform this tasty bowl into an Italian version with mozzarella, pesto, tomatoes, spinach and basil.—Kelly Walsh, Aviston, Illinois Go to Recipe One day, company was on the way, and I forgot to buy salad fixings.—Renae Rossow, Union, Kentucky Go to Recipe It's easy to love this pretty salad topped with strawberries and sliced almonds.Colorful Quinoa Salad with Spinach My youngest daughter recently learned she has to avoid gluten, dairy and eggs, which gave me a new challenge in the kitchen.—Catherine Turnbull, Burlington, Ontario Go to Recipe My youngest daughter recently learned she has to avoid gluten, dairy and eggs, which gave me a new challenge in the kitchen.Fresh spinach leaves are tossed with toasted almonds and dried cranberries and drizzled with poppy seed dressing.Fresh spinach leaves are tossed with toasted almonds and dried cranberries and drizzled with poppy seed dressing.Yellow Squash & Watermelon Spinach Salad I always enjoy taking this healthy option to parties and potlucks, and people really seem to appreciate it.No oil is necessary for this salad; the lemon juice combines with the feta to lightly coat the bright, fresh ingredients.—Camille Parker, Chicago, Illinois Go to Recipe I always enjoy taking this healthy option to parties and potlucks, and people really seem to appreciate it.No oil is necessary for this salad; the lemon juice combines with the feta to lightly coat the bright, fresh ingredients.Salmon and Spud Spinach Salad I headed straight for the kitchen when I decided to pick up a healthier lifestyle.—Matthew Teixeira, Milton, Ontario Go to Recipe I headed straight for the kitchen when I decided to pick up a healthier lifestyle.—Sarah Johnson, Indianapolis, Indiana Go to Recipe We make quinoa with spinach and strawberries year-round, but it's most fun when we go to the farmers market to get the season’s first berries.—Wendy Ball, Battle Creek, Michigan Go to Recipe Bright berries and creamy goat cheese make this one a winner!—Jenny Dawson, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin Go to Recipe We eat a power salad packed with salmon and spinach at least once a week.—Nancy Heishman, Las Vegas, Nevada Go to Recipe Zucchini, cucumbers and carrots are peeled into “ribbons” for this citrusy salad.—Jean Murawski, Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan Go to Recipe For a salad with refreshing color and crunch, we toss chicken and spinach with mandarin oranges and red onion, then splash everything with a tangy vinaigrette.—Robin Haas, Hyde Park, Massachusetts Go to Recipe Spinach and tortellini go so well together, and this salad makes an easy meal with leftover cooked chicken.—Nancy Heishman, Las Vegas, Nevada Go to Recipe This salad is perfect for using up leftover turkey, chicken or deli meat.—Shelley Riebel, Armada, Michigan Go to Recipe With all its fresh ingredients, this pretty spinach salad was my grandma’s favorite.—Perlene Hoekema, Lynden, Washington Go to Recipe This strawberry-spinach salad makes a wonderful light summer meal. .

Baby Spinach: Health Benefits, Nutrients per Serving, Preparation

Health Benefits In addition to its vitamin and mineral content, baby spinach also offers plenty of antioxidants.It contains nutrients like lutein, zeaxanthin, nitrates, and quercetin, which are all good for your overall health and wellbeing. .

Spinach 101: Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is a leafy green vegetable that originated in Persia.Also known as folate or vitamin B9, this compound is vital for pregnant women and essential for normal cellular function and tissue growth.Also known as folate or vitamin B9, this compound is vital for pregnant women and essential for normal cellular function and tissue growth.This mineral is essential for bone health and a crucial signaling molecule for your nervous system, heart, and muscles.SUMMARY Spinach boasts many plant compounds that can improve health, such as lutein, kaempferol, nitrates, quercetin, and zeaxanthin.They can cause oxidative stress, which triggers accelerated aging and increases your risk of cancer and diabetes ( 11 ).However, spinach contains antioxidants, which fight oxidative stress and help reduce the damage it causes.One study in eight healthy people found that spinach helped prevent oxidative damage.Eye health Spinach is rich in zeaxanthin and lutein, which are the carotenoids responsible for color in some vegetables.Additionally, several studies indicate that zeaxanthin and lutein work to prevent macular degeneration and cataracts, which are major causes of blindness ( 16 , 17 , 18 , 19 ).Several human studies link spinach consumption to a reduced risk of prostate cancer.Likewise, one animal study notes that spinach might suppress cancer formation ( 26 ).Additionally, spinach packs high amounts of antioxidants, which may also fight cancer ( 27 ).One study in 27 people found that eating spinach effectively lowered blood pressure levels.Several other studies observed similar effects, indicating that spinach boosts heart health ( 7 , 30 , 31 ).It may reduce oxidative stress, promote eye health, fight cancer, and regulate blood pressure.People who are taking blood thinners, such as warfarin, should consult with their healthcare practitioner before eating large amounts of spinach ( 34 ).This leafy green is also very high in vitamin K1, which can be a problem for people on blood thinners. .

baby spinach and arugula salad blend

this blend mixes the original superfood with the wild child of greens to make a tasty mix with a peppery kick that you will love! .

Spinach: Nutrition, health benefits, and diet

This article explores the nutrition contained in spinach, how it can benefit the body, and a range of flavorsome ways to include it in the diet.Consuming large amounts of oxalate in the diet can increase a person’s risk of developing kidney stones.Additionally, if someone is taking blood-thinners, such as warfarin, it is important that they do not suddenly begin to change the amount of food they eat containing vitamin K, such as spinach. .

Spinach

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is a leafy green flowering plant native to central and western Asia.Its leaves are a common edible vegetable consumed either fresh, or after storage using preservation techniques by canning, freezing, or dehydration.It may be eaten cooked or raw, and the taste differs considerably; the high oxalate content may be reduced by steaming.Originally from Persian aspānāḵ, entering into the European languages by way of Latin, which received it from Arabic.In a 100 g (3.5 oz) serving providing only 23 calories, spinach has a high nutritional value, especially when fresh, frozen, steamed, or quickly boiled.Although spinach is touted as being high in iron and calcium content, and is often served and consumed in its raw form, raw spinach contains high levels of oxalates, which block absorption of calcium and iron in the stomach and small intestine.Spinach cooked in several changes of water has much lower levels of oxalates and is better digested and its nutrients absorbed more completely.Spinach became a popular vegetable in the Arab Mediterranean and arrived in Spain by the latter part of the 12th century, where Ibn al-ʻAwwām called it raʼīs al-buqūl, 'the chieftain of leafy greens'.[11][15] During World War I, wine fortified with spinach juice was given to injured French soldiers with the intent to curtail their bleeding.[17] Fresh spinach is packaged in air, or in nitrogen gas to extend shelf life.While refrigeration slows this effect to about eight days, fresh spinach loses most of its folate and carotenoid content over this period of time.The Food and Drug Administration approves of irradiation of spinach leaves up to 4.0 kilograys, having no or only a minor effect on nutrient content.The comics and cartoon character Popeye the Sailor Man has been portrayed since 1931 as having a strong affinity for spinach (namely the canned variety). .

Garlic Sauteed Spinach Recipe

4) Using a slotted spoon, lift the spinach to a serving bowl and top with the butter, a squeeze of lemon, and a sprinkling of salt. .

Wilted Baby Spinach with Garlic and Oil

Wilted Baby Spinach with Garlic and Oil is my favorite way to prepare this easy side dish made with just 3 ingredients and ready in under 10 minutes.Baby spinach gets treated to a light sauté with lots of whole smashed garlic cloves in this super-quick recipe.It’s peeled and kept whole, then smashed with the side of a knife and sauteed until golden in color which gives this dish it’s nutty, garlicky flavor.Baby spinach is so convenient and easy to cook whether eaten raw in salads, boiled in soups and stews, or simple sauteed with garlic and olive oil, as I did here. .

Baby Spinach Omelet Recipe

I added a little mozzarella, diced about a third of a roma tomato and about an eighth of a red onion (but still used just a pinch of onion powder), and left out the nutmeg.Not only is it easier to flip the omelet, but also I have also found it easier to control the heat (but it might just be that the degree settings makes more sense to me than my stove settings, 1-9). .

6 Health Benefits of Spinach, According to a Nutritionist

In a study published in the journal Food & Function, researchers summarize the protective effects of spinach, based on the activity of its naturally occurring phytochemicals and bioactive compounds.For these reasons, the researchers conclude that eating more spinach may help fend off heart disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and obesity.In one small study, published in The Journal of Nutrition, 11 men and seven women consumed four different nitrate-rich drinks, including a spinach beverage.The spinach drink, in addition to those made from beetroot juice and rocket salad (another leafy green), also lowered blood pressure.One of the antioxidants in spinach, called lutein, has been shown to reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), an eye disease that can blur the sharp, central vision required for activities like reading and driving.In one Japanese study, researchers examined the eyes of 11 healthy nonsmokers who consumed 75 grams of frozen spinach containing 10 mg of lutein daily for two months.That’s important, because macular pigment acts like internal sunglasses to protect the eyes, and low or decreased MPOD is a risk factor for AMD.Scientists say the best way to consume spinach for maximum lutein intake may be in a smoothie combined with a healthful fat, such as avocado or almond butter.That’s because when spinach is chopped into small pieces, more lutein is released from the leaves, and fat increases the ability to absorb the antioxidant.Older research found that cooking also impacts the folate content of spinach; boiling slashed this B vitamin level by nearly half.A recent study looked at the effect of different cooking methods on the vitamin content in selected vegetables, included spinach.For a quick and easy side dish, toss spinach with a simple vinaigrette made from whisking together extra virgin olive oil, balsamic vinegar, Dijon mustard, and dried Italian herb seasoning.Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD, is Health's contributing nutrition editor, a New York Times best-selling author, and a private practice performance nutritionist who has consulted for five professional sports teams. .

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