Chard is a dark leafy green vegetable common in Mediterranean cuisine.The green leaves have a grooved, bumpy texture running up a colorful, thick stem.The stems of each varietal are different colors, spanning the entire rainbow from white to purple.Whether eaten raw or cooked, chard is easy to prepare—rinse and remove the stems if you like—and it definitely brings a pop of color to the dinner table.As with collard greens and kale, it's best to remove the stems and ribs from the centers of the leaves because they can be tough and fibrous.Cooking tends to diminish the bitterness so that its earthy, sweet, almost beetlike flavor is more pronounced.When bunches of rainbow chard are available, they're easy to spot among the leafy greens in a produce market.You may also have luck finding it at farmers markets, and chard is an easy vegetable to grow in gardens or containers.Choose chard with bright green leaves and colorful stalks, both of which should be firm.For the leaves, lay them out on paper towels, then roll them into a bundle before sealing in a plastic bag.Left whole, chard can be refrigerated loosely wrapped in plastic for a couple of days.Drain the chard well before packaging in separate freezer bags with as much air removed as possible.Fermenting chard stems in water allows you to store a jar in the refrigerator for three to six months.Kale is an acquired taste, and not everyone enjoys its strong, earthy, slightly bitter flavor. .

Swiss chard: Possible health benefits, uses, and risks

Along with other leafy greens and descendants of the beet family, Swiss chard contains high levels of nitrates, which been shown to lower blood pressure , reduce the amount of oxygen needed during exercise, and enhance athletic performance.Just one cup provides over three times the recommended daily allowance of vitamin K.A cup of Swiss chard provides 44 percent of the daily allowance of vitamin A and 18 percent of the recommended amount of vitamin C.People whose diets are low in the minerals calcium, magnesium, and potassium are more likely to have high blood pressure.A 2013 study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, found that foods that are high in dietary nitrates, like Swiss chard, have multiple vascular benefits.Swiss chard contains an antioxidant known as alpha-lipoic acid.This has been shown to lower glucose levels, increase insulin sensitivity, and prevent oxidative stress-induced changes in patients with diabetes.Dietary nitrates have been shown to improve muscle oxygenation during exercise.In one study, beetroot juice, also high in dietary nitrates, improved performance by 2.8 percent over 11 seconds in a 4-kilometer (km) bicycle time trial. .

9 Healthy Facts About Swiss Chard

This leafy green was identified by a Swiss botanist and is a variety of Beta vulgaris.The plant has numerous monikers, including silverbeet, Roman kale, and strawberry spinach.The tall leafy vegetable is a part of the goosefoot family -- aptly named because the leaves resemble a goose’s foot.Prepare Swiss chard by rinsing the crisp leaves several times in warm water.One cup of chopped Swiss chard has just 35 calories and provides more than 300% of the daily value for vitamin K. But skip this veggie if you’re prone to kidney stones; it contains oxalates, which decrease the body’s absorption of calcium and can lead to kidney stones. .

Swiss Chard: Nutrition, Benefits and How to Cook It

Although kale is often deemed the king of greens, Swiss chard is equally impressive in its wide array of nutritional benefits.Origin and Nutrition Swiss chard is a leafy green belonging to the Chenopodioideae family, which also includes beets and spinach ( 1 ).Consuming a diet high in the antioxidants found in Swiss chard may decrease your chances of developing certain chronic diseases.Summary Swiss chard is high in many antioxidants including beta-carotene and flavonoids, which may help prevent certain conditions like heart disease and lung cancer.Summary Swiss chard is high in fiber, an important nutrient that can help maintain weight, lower your risk of certain cancers and promote heart health.On the other hand, people who consume diets high in vitamin-K-rich foods have greater bone mineral density and lower rates of osteoporosis ( 20 ).Summary Swiss chard is an excellent source of vitamin K, a nutrient essential for proper blood clotting and skeletal health.Swiss chard is an excellent source of potassium, calcium and magnesium, minerals that help maintain healthy blood pressure ( 21 ).Many large studies indicate that people with a higher intake of green leafy vegetables like Swiss chard have a decreased risk of heart disease.One study in over 173,000 people linked every one-serving increment of leafy green vegetables per day to an 11% reduction in heart disease risk.Summary Swiss chard may help lower blood pressure and cholesterol, which may prevent heart disease.Consuming more fiber-rich vegetables like Swiss chard can improve symptoms in those with diabetes and insulin resistance and reduce the chances of these diseases occurring in the first place ( 28 ).Plus, Swiss chard is high in antioxidants, such as alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), which has been shown to reduce insulin resistance and improve diabetes-related complications, including nerve damage ( 29 ).Summary Swiss chard is high in fiber and antioxidants, which may improve blood sugar control and lower your risk of diabetes.Filling up on high-fiber vegetables like Swiss chard can increase fullness after meals, reducing your risk of snacking and overeating.In a study in 120 overweight adults, those who received twice the amount of vegetables than the control group experienced greater weight loss and hunger satisfaction ( 31 ).A review of 17 studies in over 560,000 participants noted that those with the highest intake of vegetables were 17% less likely to be overweight or obese ( 32 ).Summary Swiss chard is a mild green that can be used in a number of dishes, including salads, pastas and sides. .

Easy Swiss Chard Recipe

In the spectrum of greens, Swiss chard lies between spinach and kale—not as tender as spinach, not as tough as kale.If you don't have coriander, you can skip it, but if you do have it it will make this simple swiss chard dish truly special. .

Chard

A beet family vegetable with crinkly green leaves and celery like stalks.Red chard = rhubarb chard = ruby chard, with green leaves and red stalks, is slightly more tender and flavorful than white chard = green chard, with white stalks and green leaves, but the two are interchangeable in most recipes.Season. .

Chard

Chard, like other green leafy vegetables, has highly nutritious leaves, making it a popular component of healthy diets.[7] Its taxonomic rank has changed many times, so it was treated as a subspecies, convariety, or variety of Beta vulgaris.Chard belongs to the chenopods, which are now mostly included in the family Amaranthaceae (sensu lato).The origin of the adjective "Swiss" is unclear, since this coastal plant is not native to Switzerland.Chard is used in traditional Swiss cuisine, however, namely in a dish called capuns from the canton of Grisons.Clusters of chard seeds are usually sown, in the Northern Hemisphere, between June and October, depending on the desired harvesting period.Chard can be harvested while the leaves are young and tender, or after maturity when they are larger and have slightly tougher stems.Harvesting is a continuous process, as most species of chard produce three or more crops.Chard has shiny, green, ribbed leaves, with petioles that range from white to yellow to red, depending on the cultivar.In the Northern Hemisphere, chard is typically ready to harvest as early as April and lasts through May.When daytime temperatures start regularly to attain 30 °C (86 °F), the harvest season is coming to an end.Fresh chard can be used raw in salads, stirfries, soups or omelets.[15] Chard leaves and stalks are typically boiled or sautéed; the bitterness fades with cooking.[3] Also having significant content in raw chard are vitamin E and the dietary minerals, magnesium, manganese, iron, and potassium.[3] Raw chard has low content of carbohydrates, protein, fat, and dietary fiber. .

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