If you are stuck in the rut of baby spinach from a plastic box every week, it’s time to get on the Chard train!Before we get to the tips on how to make this simple sautéed Swiss chard, here are some useful facts about it!The stems need a little more cooking time than the leaves because they have a lot of cellulose that needs to soften for longer.Swiss Chard can be eaten raw, though it contains oxalic acid, so it may be better for you to eat it cooked.But actually it is a general common name for chard, and got the designation from the botanist who determined the plants scientific name in the 19th century.To wilt the greens, splash in a couple tablespoons water and cover the skillet with a lid.Note: If you don’t have a very large skillet with a lid you can do this in a wide Dutch oven instead.Other ways to add a bit of pizzazz are to add a handful of toasted almonds or pine nuts, golden raisins, dried cranberries or dried currants, or even a little crumbled feta or goat cheese.Chard Tart with Goat Cheese, this is a lovely vegetarian entree for the holidays or entertaining.This Balsamic Chicken would be nice or my beloved Turkey Meatloaf recipe.This sautéed swiss chard would be a super yummy and easy accompaniment to these Lemon Caper Salmon Cakes.For a weekend meal, try this spatchcocked chicken and a batch of simple saffron rice.Or for a vegetarian meal, serve this with my pumpkin brown rice risotto.Let me know if you make this recipe by coming back and leaving a star rating and review! .

7 Ways to Use Swiss Chard

Swiss chard, which is related to beets, is packed with phytonutrients, including eye-protective lutein and zeaxanthin.Swiss chard, which is related to beets, is packed with phytonutrients, including eye-protective lutein and zeaxanthin.Fill tortillas with cooked Swiss chard and scrambled eggs for a superb power breakfast.Give soup an extra nutrient boost by adding the greens during the last 15 minutes of cooking.Unlike kale, Swiss chard isn’t so tasty raw, but that doesn’t mean you can’t make a salad. .

Swiss chard: Possible health benefits, uses, and risks

Along with other leafy greens and descendants of the beet family, Swiss chard contains high levels of nitrates, which been shown to lower blood pressure , reduce the amount of oxygen needed during exercise, and enhance athletic performance.Just one cup provides over three times the recommended daily allowance of vitamin K.A cup of Swiss chard provides 44 percent of the daily allowance of vitamin A and 18 percent of the recommended amount of vitamin C.People whose diets are low in the minerals calcium, magnesium, and potassium are more likely to have high blood pressure.A 2013 study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, found that foods that are high in dietary nitrates, like Swiss chard, have multiple vascular benefits.Swiss chard contains an antioxidant known as alpha-lipoic acid.This has been shown to lower glucose levels, increase insulin sensitivity, and prevent oxidative stress-induced changes in patients with diabetes.Dietary nitrates have been shown to improve muscle oxygenation during exercise.In one study, beetroot juice, also high in dietary nitrates, improved performance by 2.8 percent over 11 seconds in a 4-kilometer (km) bicycle time trial. .

9 Healthy Facts About Swiss Chard

The earthy-tasting Swiss chard is a powerhouse of nutrition.And with its rainbow assortment of stem colors, it's as pleasing on the plate as it is to the palate.The plant has numerous monikers, including silverbeet, Roman kale, and strawberry spinach.The tall leafy vegetable is a part of the goosefoot family -- aptly named because the leaves resemble a goose’s foot.Leaves and stalks can be boiled, steamed, or roasted. .

How to Use Swiss Chard

Swiss chard, which is related to beets, is packed with phytonutrients including eye-protective lutein and zeaxanthin.With Swiss chard, you also get a sturdy stem that’s delicious sautéed with the leaves or pickled on its own.”. .

Easy Swiss Chard Recipe

In the spectrum of greens, Swiss chard lies between spinach and kale—not as tender as spinach, not as tough as kale.If you don't have coriander, you can skip it, but if you do have it it will make this simple swiss chard dish truly special. .

Swiss Chard: Nutrition, Benefits and How to Cook It

Although kale is often deemed the king of greens, Swiss chard is equally impressive in its wide array of nutritional benefits.Origin and Nutrition Swiss chard is a leafy green belonging to the Chenopodioideae family, which also includes beets and spinach ( 1 ).Consuming a diet high in the antioxidants found in Swiss chard may decrease your chances of developing certain chronic diseases.Summary Swiss chard is high in many antioxidants including beta-carotene and flavonoids, which may help prevent certain conditions like heart disease and lung cancer.Summary Swiss chard is high in fiber, an important nutrient that can help maintain weight, lower your risk of certain cancers and promote heart health.On the other hand, people who consume diets high in vitamin-K-rich foods have greater bone mineral density and lower rates of osteoporosis ( 20 ).Summary Swiss chard is an excellent source of vitamin K, a nutrient essential for proper blood clotting and skeletal health.Swiss chard is an excellent source of potassium, calcium and magnesium, minerals that help maintain healthy blood pressure ( 21 ).Many large studies indicate that people with a higher intake of green leafy vegetables like Swiss chard have a decreased risk of heart disease.One study in over 173,000 people linked every one-serving increment of leafy green vegetables per day to an 11% reduction in heart disease risk.Summary Swiss chard may help lower blood pressure and cholesterol, which may prevent heart disease.Consuming more fiber-rich vegetables like Swiss chard can improve symptoms in those with diabetes and insulin resistance and reduce the chances of these diseases occurring in the first place ( 28 ).Plus, Swiss chard is high in antioxidants, such as alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), which has been shown to reduce insulin resistance and improve diabetes-related complications, including nerve damage ( 29 ).Summary Swiss chard is high in fiber and antioxidants, which may improve blood sugar control and lower your risk of diabetes.Filling up on high-fiber vegetables like Swiss chard can increase fullness after meals, reducing your risk of snacking and overeating.In a study in 120 overweight adults, those who received twice the amount of vegetables than the control group experienced greater weight loss and hunger satisfaction ( 31 ).A review of 17 studies in over 560,000 participants noted that those with the highest intake of vegetables were 17% less likely to be overweight or obese ( 32 ).Summary Swiss chard is a mild green that can be used in a number of dishes, including salads, pastas and sides. .

7 S 9 H E S

Leave a reply

your email address will not be published. required fields are marked *

Name *
Email *
Website