In the spectrum of greens, Swiss chard lies between spinach and kale—not as tender as spinach, not as tough as kale.If you don't have coriander, you can skip it, but if you do have it it will make this simple swiss chard dish truly special. .

Chard

Chard or Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris subsp.vulgaris, Cicla Group and Flavescens Group) ( ) is a green leafy vegetable.In the cultivars of the Flavescens Group, the leaf stalks are large and often prepared separately from the leaf blade;[1] the Cicla Group is the leafy spinach beet.Koch (Cicla Group), B. vulgaris subsp.cicla L. , B.

vulgaris var.Koch (Flavescens Group), B. vulgaris subsp.vulgaris (Swiss Chard Group)).[9][10] They are cultivated descendants of the sea beet, Beta vulgaris subsp.The two rankless cultivar groups for chard are the Cicla Group for the leafy spinach beet, and the Flavescens Group for the stalky Swiss chard.Growth and harvesting [ edit ].[14] Raw chard is extremely perishable.Cultivars of chard include green forms, such as 'Lucullus' and 'Fordhook Giant', as well as red-ribbed forms such as 'Ruby Chard' and 'Rhubarb Chard'.In the Northern Hemisphere, chard is typically ready to harvest as early as April and lasts through May.It is one of the hardier leafy greens, with a harvest season typically lasting longer than kale, spinach, or baby greens.Nutritional content [ edit ].

.

Swiss Chard: Nutrition, Benefits and How to Cook It

What’s more, its leaves and stalks provide an abundance of vitamins, minerals and powerful plant compounds.3.7 grams Vitamin A: 214% of the Reference Daily Intake (RDI).22% of the RDI Potassium: 27% of the RDI As you can see, a small serving of cooked Swiss chard covers your daily need for vitamins A and K and nearly fulfills the RDI for vitamin C. What’s more, Swiss chard is a good source of calcium, magnesium, copper, zinc, sodium, phosphorus and vitamin E.

This green is not only loaded with nutrients but also extremely low in calories, making it a weight-loss-friendly food.Research shows that Vitexin, another flavonoid found in Swiss chard, may help fight heart disease by lowering blood pressure, reducing inflammation and inhibiting blood clotting ( 8 ).Summary Swiss chard is high in many antioxidants including beta-carotene and flavonoids, which may help prevent certain conditions like heart disease and lung cancer.Just 1 cup (175 grams) of cooked Swiss chard provides about 4 grams of fiber — 15% of the RDI.Following a high-fiber diet provides many health benefits.Summary Swiss chard is high in fiber, an important nutrient that can help maintain weight, lower your risk of certain cancers and promote heart health.Just 1 cup (175 grams) of cooked Swiss chards offers 716% of the RDI for this important nutrient (17).Summary Swiss chard is an excellent source of vitamin K, a nutrient essential for proper blood clotting and skeletal health.Many large studies indicate that people with a higher intake of green leafy vegetables like Swiss chard have a decreased risk of heart disease.Summary Swiss chard may help lower blood pressure and cholesterol, which may prevent heart disease.May Decrease Insulin Resistance and Lower Blood Sugar Swiss chard is loaded with nutrients that may lower blood sugar, or glucose.For example, Swiss chard’s fiber may help maintain healthy glucose levels in your blood.Summary Swiss chard is high in fiber and antioxidants, which may improve blood sugar control and lower your risk of diabetes.Summary Swiss chard is high in fiber and low in calories, making it a weight-loss-friendly food.How to Add It to Your Diet Swiss chard is a nutritional powerhouse that you can eat in many ways.Summary Swiss chard is a mild green that can be used in a number of dishes, including salads, pastas and sides. .

Swiss chard: Possible health benefits, uses, and risks

Along with other leafy greens and descendants of the beet family, Swiss chard contains high levels of nitrates, which been shown to lower blood pressure , reduce the amount of oxygen needed during exercise, and enhance athletic performance.Just one cup provides over three times the recommended daily allowance of vitamin K.A cup of Swiss chard provides 44 percent of the daily allowance of vitamin A and 18 percent of the recommended amount of vitamin C.People whose diets are low in the minerals calcium, magnesium, and potassium are more likely to have high blood pressure.A 2013 study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, found that foods that are high in dietary nitrates, like Swiss chard, have multiple vascular benefits.Swiss chard contains an antioxidant known as alpha-lipoic acid.This has been shown to lower glucose levels, increase insulin sensitivity, and prevent oxidative stress-induced changes in patients with diabetes.Dietary nitrates have been shown to improve muscle oxygenation during exercise.In one study, beetroot juice, also high in dietary nitrates, improved performance by 2.8 percent over 11 seconds in a 4-kilometer (km) bicycle time trial. .

Swiss Chard: What Is It and What Do You Do With It? – Bonnie Plants

The variety we sell is called Bright Lights Swiss chard, and it’s beautiful as well as flavorful—it seriously looks like a rainbow in the garden.Nowhere else in my vegetable garden do I see colors as vivid as hot pink and neon orange (except for in the flowers like coneflower and marigolds that I grow to attract bees).You can plant it in early spring and it will stay lush long after all the other greens have bolted, because chard tolerates both cold and heat, though I do think the colors fade a bit in the warmer weather.My father-in-law made those wooden boxes, I planted them for our wedding earlier this spring, and we gave them away to friends and family after the celebration. .

9 Healthy Facts About Swiss Chard

The earthy-tasting Swiss chard is a powerhouse of nutrition.And with its rainbow assortment of stem colors, it's as pleasing on the plate as it is to the palate.The plant has numerous monikers, including silverbeet, Roman kale, and strawberry spinach.The tall leafy vegetable is a part of the goosefoot family -- aptly named because the leaves resemble a goose’s foot.Leaves and stalks can be boiled, steamed, or roasted. .

What Is Chard and How Is It Used?

Chard is a dark leafy green vegetable common in Mediterranean cuisine.The green leaves have a grooved, bumpy texture running up a colorful, thick stem.The stems of each varietal are different colors, spanning the entire rainbow from white to purple.Whether eaten raw or cooked, chard is easy to prepare—rinse and remove the stems if you like—and it definitely brings a pop of color to the dinner table.As with collard greens and kale, it's best to remove the stems and ribs from the centers of the leaves because they can be tough and fibrous.Cooking tends to diminish the bitterness so that its earthy, sweet, almost beetlike flavor is more pronounced.When bunches of rainbow chard are available, they're easy to spot among the leafy greens in a produce market.You may also have luck finding it at farmers markets, and chard is an easy vegetable to grow in gardens or containers.Choose chard with bright green leaves and colorful stalks, both of which should be firm.For the leaves, lay them out on paper towels, then roll them into a bundle before sealing in a plastic bag.Left whole, chard can be refrigerated loosely wrapped in plastic for a couple of days.Drain the chard well before packaging in separate freezer bags with as much air removed as possible.Fermenting chard stems in water allows you to store a jar in the refrigerator for three to six months.Kale is an acquired taste, and not everyone enjoys its strong, earthy, slightly bitter flavor. .

C S S S 9 W

Leave a reply

your email address will not be published. required fields are marked *

Name *
Email *
Website