Along with other leafy greens and descendants of the beet family, Swiss chard contains high levels of nitrates, which been shown to lower blood pressure , reduce the amount of oxygen needed during exercise, and enhance athletic performance.However, consumers should not add salt to Swiss chard, because it already has 103 mg of sodium per raw cup, which is 4.5 percent of the recommended daily allowance.Swiss chard also contains lesser amounts of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B6, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, and selenium .Many studies have suggested that consuming more plant foods such as Swiss chard decreases the risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and overall mortality and promotes a healthy complexion, increased energy, and overall lower weight.These minerals are thought to reduce blood pressure by releasing sodium out of the body and helping arteries dilate.A 2013 study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, found that foods that are high in dietary nitrates, like Swiss chard, have multiple vascular benefits.These include reducing blood pressure, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and preserving or improving endothelial dysfunction.Swiss chard contains chlorophyll, which may be effective at blocking the cancer-causing heterocyclic amines generated when grilling foods at a high temperature.In one study, beetroot juice, also high in dietary nitrates, improved performance by 2.8 percent over 11 seconds in a 4-kilometer (km) bicycle time trial. .

10 Ways You Should Be Eating Chard This Summer

First of all, it doesn't have that bitter peppery taste that a lot of other greens have, so its mild flavor is suitable to any dish.There's also the fact that it's loaded with Vitamins A, C, and K. You can add chard to your pastas, pizzas, or quiches, and the stems even make for some seriously good pickles.Or put them to good use in Runner Beans with Swiss Chard Stems and Basil.Use those big leaves to your advantage and make swiss chard roll ups with your favorite meats, cheeses, and spreads.

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Growing a Top Superfood: Swiss Chard

Related to beets, this nutrient-dense, delicious, versatile vegetable doesn’t get nearly the amount of attention as popular greens such as spinach and kale.An excellent source of vitamins A, B, C, K, heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, calcium, copper, iron, manganese, phosphorus and potassium—it’s among the healthiest foods you can eat.Fun fact: Swiss chard is a Mediterranean plant and not actually native to Switzerland, as you might expect.This variety is highly productive and resists bolting, resulting in a longer growing season.This variety is highly productive and resists bolting, resulting in a longer growing season.Rhubarb chard has deep-green, crinkly leaves with bright crimson stalks that contain phyto-nutrients called betalains.But it’s still considered a cool season crop with an optimal growing temperature of 50–70°, as these conditions produce the sweetest, most tender leaves.If you’re growing in warmer temperatures, consider planting Swiss chard where it will receive afternoon shade.Because Swiss chard grows tall, we recommend planting it in the top section of your Tower Garden.Aphids are small insects that typically feed on young plant growth, causing it to appear puckered or deformed.are small insects that typically feed on young plant growth, causing it to appear puckered or deformed.Downy mildew looks like fine white cotton or frosting and often infects lower plant leaves first.As the disease progresses, spots enlarge, ultimately resulting in small holes before leaves turn brown and die.Tower Tip: Learn how you can naturally beat bad bugs and prevent plant diseases.Swiss chard leaves make a convincing spinach substitute, as the stalks do for asparagus or celery.The healthy green is delicious simply sautéed with lemon juice and sprinkled with Parmesan cheese. .

Simple Sautéed Swiss Chard

If you are stuck in the rut of baby spinach from a plastic box every week, it’s time to get on the Chard train!Before we get to the tips on how to make this simple sautéed Swiss chard, here are some useful facts about it!The stems need a little more cooking time than the leaves because they have a lot of cellulose that needs to soften for longer.Swiss Chard can be eaten raw, though it contains oxalic acid, so it may be better for you to eat it cooked.But actually it is a general common name for chard, and got the designation from the botanist who determined the plants scientific name in the 19th century.To wilt the greens, splash in a couple tablespoons water and cover the skillet with a lid.Note: If you don’t have a very large skillet with a lid you can do this in a wide Dutch oven instead.Other ways to add a bit of pizzazz are to add a handful of toasted almonds or pine nuts, golden raisins, dried cranberries or dried currants, or even a little crumbled feta or goat cheese.Chard Tart with Goat Cheese, this is a lovely vegetarian entree for the holidays or entertaining.This Balsamic Chicken would be nice or my beloved Turkey Meatloaf recipe.This sautéed swiss chard would be a super yummy and easy accompaniment to these Lemon Caper Salmon Cakes.For a weekend meal, try this spatchcocked chicken and a batch of simple saffron rice.Or for a vegetarian meal, serve this with my pumpkin brown rice risotto.Let me know if you make this recipe by coming back and leaving a star rating and review! .

Swiss Chard: Nutrition, Health Benefits, and How to Cook It

Although kale is often deemed the king of greens, Swiss chard is equally impressive for its wide array of nutritional benefits.This article explains everything you need to know about Swiss chard, including its nutrients, health benefits, and potential downsides.Swiss chard is a leafy green belonging to the Chenopodioideae family, which also includes beets and spinach ( 1 ).Grown worldwide, it’s prized for its ability to grow in poor soils and its low need for water and light.There are many types of Swiss chard, some of which have colorful, jewel-toned stalks and veins that make this vegetable particularly pleasing to the eye.What’s more, Swiss chard is a good source of iron, copper, potassium, calcium, and vitamin E. This green is not only loaded with nutrients but also extremely low in calories, so it’s a great option to help you maintain a moderate weight.Summary Swiss chard is low in calories and high in magnesium, iron, potassium, and vitamins A, C, and K.Potential health risks Though Swiss chard can be a nutritious addition to the diet for most healthy adults, some people may need to limit or moderate their intake.To help prevent kidney stones, try to stay hydrated, limit sodium intake, and get enough calcium ( 32 , 33 ).To help prevent kidney stones, try to stay hydrated, limit sodium intake, and get enough calcium ( , ).Summary Swiss chard contains certain nutrients and compounds that some people may need to limit, including vitamin K and dietary oxalates.Here are a few tips to consider when purchasing Swiss chard: Look for bunches that have brightly colored stalks and smooth leaves.Though buying conventional Swiss chard may be more cost-effective, some people may prefer purchasing organic varieties due to concerns about pesticide exposure and long-term effects on health ( 36 ).It has an earthy, somewhat bitter taste when consumed raw and a slightly sweet, milder flavor when cooked.You can wrap Swiss chard in a damp cloth or paper towel and store it in an unsealed bag in the refrigerator.Then, plunge the Swiss chard into ice water to stop the cooking process and drain it thoroughly before placing it in a plastic bag, removing as much air as possible, and freezing it.It prefers cool or moderate weather, full to partial sunlight, and loose, well-draining soil.You can start harvesting Swiss chard once the plant is 6–8 inches (15–20 cm) tall by cutting the outer leaves.Be sure to sever at the base of the plant using scissors or a knife and avoid damaging the terminal bud. .

Can you eat the stems of Swiss chard?

ANSWER: Swiss chard has leaves that are more tender and delicate than most large, leafy greens—and the same goes for the stems.You can also use the stems and leaves together if the greens are whirred in a food processor or chopped so finely that the texture differences become irrelevant, as when chard is used as an ingredient in a recipe like pesto or hummus. .

Swiss chard

Although they’re unrelated, chard is similar to spinach, but with a stronger, more assertive (or, as some think, bitter) flavour.Unlike many vegetables, larger Swiss chard leaves aren’t necessarily tougher than smaller ones.Our Swiss chard gratin goes well with venison or a meaty fish like turbot or halibut.Pickling the chard first gives it a very deep, robust flavour that pairs well with the star anise and punchy gruyère.Try baking these luscious, leafy greens with garlic, cream and plenty of parmesan for an indulgent side dish.Bring some green goodness to a standard side dish with our quick braised chard & lentils with a light olive oil dressing.This wholesome chard, sweet potato & peanut stew is an ideal winter warmer.It’s the perfect balance of sweet and savoury, with a deliciously nutty flavour we can’t resist.Our final sensational side dish is Swiss chard & kohlrabi with a lemon sauce.This healthy bowl of greens is full of fresh flavours and goes well with grilled salmon or a simple chicken breast. .

Can Swiss Chard Be Eaten Raw?

Answer: It’s true that many of us are most familiar with eating Swiss chard when it’s been cooked low and slow as part of a braised dish, but this nutritious leafy green can also be eaten raw.It’s delicious as a simple, classic salad, of course, but here are some less conventional ways you can enjoy your homegrown Swiss chard without spending the time to cook the greens, and you won’t have to heat up the oven or stove.Raw Swiss Chard Veggie Wraps with Pecan Spread from Vegetarian Times.Vegan Chicken Salad Sandwich with Curry and Swiss Chard from Peaceful Dumpling (Of course, carnivores can sub in chicken salad made the traditional way if they want some meat on their sandwiches.). .

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