Fresh chard is highly perishable and difficult to ship to distant markets.Some cultivars, often marketed as “rainbow chard,” have colourful stalks, which can be red, orange, yellow, or pale green. .

Chard

Chard, like other green leafy vegetables, has highly nutritious leaves, making it a popular component of healthy diets.[7] Its taxonomic rank has changed many times, so it was treated as a subspecies, convariety, or variety of Beta vulgaris.Chard belongs to the chenopods, which are now mostly included in the family Amaranthaceae (sensu lato).The origin of the adjective "Swiss" is unclear, since this coastal plant is native to Sicily, not Switzerland.Chard is used in traditional Swiss cuisine, however, namely in a dish called capuns from the canton of Grisons.Clusters of chard seeds are usually sown, in the Northern Hemisphere, between June and October, depending on the desired harvesting period.Chard can be harvested while the leaves are young and tender, or after maturity when they are larger and have slightly tougher stems.Harvesting is a continuous process, as most species of chard produce three or more crops.Chard has shiny, green, ribbed leaves, with petioles that range from white to yellow to red, depending on the cultivar.In the Northern Hemisphere, chard is typically ready to harvest as early as April and lasts through May.When daytime temperatures start regularly to attain 30 °C (86 °F), the harvest season is coming to an end.Fresh chard can be used raw in salads, stirfries, soups or omelets.[15] Chard leaves and stalks are typically boiled or sautéed; the bitterness fades with cooking.[3] Also having significant content in raw chard are vitamin E and the dietary minerals, magnesium, manganese, iron, and potassium.[3] Raw chard has low content of carbohydrates, protein, fat, and dietary fiber. .

What family does Swiss chard belong to?

Chard, (Beta vulgaris, variety cicla), also called Swiss chard, variety of the beet of the amaranth family (Amaranthaceae), grown for its edible leaves and leafstalks.Swiss chard is often associated with the pathogens coli, Listeria, and Salmonella because the crop is a raw, fresh marketed product.The brightly colored ribs of the celery-like stems belong to the well-known Swiss chard plant family. .

Swiss Chard: Nutrition, Benefits and How to Cook It

Although kale is often deemed the king of greens, Swiss chard is equally impressive in its wide array of nutritional benefits.Origin and Nutrition Swiss chard is a leafy green belonging to the Chenopodioideae family, which also includes beets and spinach ( 1 ).Consuming a diet high in the antioxidants found in Swiss chard may decrease your chances of developing certain chronic diseases.Summary Swiss chard is high in many antioxidants including beta-carotene and flavonoids, which may help prevent certain conditions like heart disease and lung cancer.Summary Swiss chard is high in fiber, an important nutrient that can help maintain weight, lower your risk of certain cancers and promote heart health.On the other hand, people who consume diets high in vitamin-K-rich foods have greater bone mineral density and lower rates of osteoporosis ( 20 ).Summary Swiss chard is an excellent source of vitamin K, a nutrient essential for proper blood clotting and skeletal health.Swiss chard is an excellent source of potassium, calcium and magnesium, minerals that help maintain healthy blood pressure ( 21 ).Many large studies indicate that people with a higher intake of green leafy vegetables like Swiss chard have a decreased risk of heart disease.One study in over 173,000 people linked every one-serving increment of leafy green vegetables per day to an 11% reduction in heart disease risk.Summary Swiss chard may help lower blood pressure and cholesterol, which may prevent heart disease.Consuming more fiber-rich vegetables like Swiss chard can improve symptoms in those with diabetes and insulin resistance and reduce the chances of these diseases occurring in the first place ( 28 ).Plus, Swiss chard is high in antioxidants, such as alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), which has been shown to reduce insulin resistance and improve diabetes-related complications, including nerve damage ( 29 ).Summary Swiss chard is high in fiber and antioxidants, which may improve blood sugar control and lower your risk of diabetes.Filling up on high-fiber vegetables like Swiss chard can increase fullness after meals, reducing your risk of snacking and overeating.In a study in 120 overweight adults, those who received twice the amount of vegetables than the control group experienced greater weight loss and hunger satisfaction ( 31 ).A review of 17 studies in over 560,000 participants noted that those with the highest intake of vegetables were 17% less likely to be overweight or obese ( 32 ).Summary Swiss chard is a mild green that can be used in a number of dishes, including salads, pastas and sides. .

Swiss Chard – Wisconsin Horticulture

Also know as silverbeet (mainly in New Zealand and Australia), chard is a biennial plant grown as an annual for its rosette of big crinkly leaves and/or wide crunchy stems.The leaves are very similar to beet greens, but have prominent, enlarged midribs and are borne on stout petioles.Chard does best in full sun, although it tolerates partial shade and likes fertile, well-worked soil with good drainage and high organic content.Aphids and spinach leafminer occasionally infest chard but there are no serious disease problems.Lamb’s-quarters (Chenopodium album) is a wild host of the leafminer which commonly grows in and around, so flies may continue to move in from infested weeds in nearby areas.The petioles can be white, yellow, gold, orange, pink, red or striped.The petioles can be white, yellow, gold, orange, pink, red or striped.‘Fordhook Giant’ has broad, thick white midribs and petioles, with heavily crinkled, dark green leaves.‘Lucullus’ is an older variety that produces very broad and thick, white or pale green petioles.‘Rhubarb’ produces crumpled, dark green leaves with deep red veins.The broad white stems and crumpled, glossy dark green leaves can be harvested individually or as a whole plant.The brightly colored petioles and wide, dark green leaves are quite attractive and are easily incorporated into the landscape as an annual ornamental foliage plant.Or you can wait until the plant is more mature to cut all the leaves off as a bunch at about 3″ above the soil surface and let it grow back.Swiss chard is quite cold tolerant and will continue to grow in the garden through frosts until temperatures drop to the mid-20’s.A cold frame usually ensures fresh chard well into December in southern Wisconsin. .

Swiss Chard

Swiss Chard - Chard belongs to the same family as beets and spinach and shares a similar taste profile: it has the bitterness of beet greens and the slightly salty flavor of spinach leaves.Wrap chard in a damp towel or place in a plastic bag and keep in the hydrator drawer of the fridge.ü Toss steamed chard leaves with olive oil, lemon juice, and salt and pepper.For an Asian flavor, toss with toasted sesame oil, rice vinegar, and tamari (wheat-free soy sauce).ü Use Swiss chard in any recipe calling for fresh spinach, like quiches, lasagna, omelets, etc.I know what it’s like when the chard has been sitting in the fridge for too long and taking up waay too much space when really they’re aren’t any plans for using it.Very lightly steam chard in SMALL amount of water for 7-9 minutes on Low temp.If using cashews instead of butter, add hemp, flax or olive oil to desired thickness.Chard high in sodium so don’t add salt ‘til you’ve tried it.Variation: add raw pumpkin seeds and cumin for a strong anti-parasitic combo. .

Vegetable Families

Many veggie gardeners talk about the importance of crop rotation in achieving a healthy, successful harvest. .

Swiss chard: Possible health benefits, uses, and risks

Along with other leafy greens and descendants of the beet family, Swiss chard contains high levels of nitrates, which been shown to lower blood pressure , reduce the amount of oxygen needed during exercise, and enhance athletic performance.However, consumers should not add salt to Swiss chard, because it already has 103 mg of sodium per raw cup, which is 4.5 percent of the recommended daily allowance.Swiss chard also contains lesser amounts of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B6, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, and selenium .Many studies have suggested that consuming more plant foods such as Swiss chard decreases the risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and overall mortality and promotes a healthy complexion, increased energy, and overall lower weight.These minerals are thought to reduce blood pressure by releasing sodium out of the body and helping arteries dilate.A 2013 study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, found that foods that are high in dietary nitrates, like Swiss chard, have multiple vascular benefits.These include reducing blood pressure, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and preserving or improving endothelial dysfunction.Swiss chard contains chlorophyll, which may be effective at blocking the cancer-causing heterocyclic amines generated when grilling foods at a high temperature.In one study, beetroot juice, also high in dietary nitrates, improved performance by 2.8 percent over 11 seconds in a 4-kilometer (km) bicycle time trial. .

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