This morning’s mail brings the following query from reader Robert Lester Porter:.There is a phenomenon in the Chicago area that perplexes me and before I go to an early grave I would like to hear an economist discourse on it.It seems that the yuppies are willing to pay exactly three times the basic market price for both regular and cherry tomatoes if those vegetables come with their stems attached.By way of full disclosure, I am uniquely unqualified to address this question, having never (to my knowledge) tasted a tomato.Indeed, despite my lack of tomato experience, I seem to have a key advantage over my correspondent Mr. Porter, whose query arrived via the quaint medium of ink on paper, folded into an envelope and delivered by the United States Postal Service.But it doesn’t really matter anyway, because Mr. Porter asked the wrong question in the first place.Answer: A monopoly seller might do exactly that, if he were trying to boost the price of on-the-vine tomatoes by restricting their supply.The economic provocateur Deirdre McCloskey observes that when the question is “Why did the man drink the motor oil?” it simply will not do to close the question by declaring triumphantly that he had a taste for drinking motor oil.Still, there’s a wide range of behavior that economists are generally comfortable attributing to nothing more mysterious than a diversity of tastes.The supply side is a tougher nut to crack, because sellers are presumably driven not by tastes but by profit, and profit, unlike the taste of a tomato, is the same no matter who measures it.Maybe that’s got something to do with shipping costs; tomatoes look like they’d be a lot harder to pack when they’re strung out in a row.Also, I’m guessing that the tomatoes most suitable for on-the-vine display have to be grown differently in the first place.Our conclusion has invariably been that the business in question is losing money fast enough to bankrupt anyone this side of Bill Gates.That’s why economists and noneconomists respond so differently to the observation that women pay more for dry cleaning than men do.To the economist, the natural question is: Why does it cost more to clean women’s clothes?How can it possibly be more expensive to sell plantains where they’re grown than to ship them abroad? .

Tomatoes on the Vine » Backyard Farms

One of the special joys of growing tomatoes is eating red, ripe, juicy fruit directly off of the vine...right there while you’re still standing in the garden.How to Enjoy Tomatoes on the Vine.It was the first variety we started growing in our greenhouse and we still take pride in harvesting them one vine-ripened cluster at a time. .

How Do Vine Ripened Tomatoes Differ From Others?

The term "vine-ripened" often inspires images of rich, red tomatoes that are perfectly ripe and bursting with flavor, but this is not what the name refers to.Tip When ripening tomatoes after harvesting, you can speed up the process by keeping them at eighty-five degrees Fahrenheit, says Kansas State University Extension.Tomatoes are picked at this point to ensure optimum quality by the time the fruit gets to the supermarket or your table.During the breaker stage, when most vine-ripened tomatoes are harvested, there is a definite differentiation in color from green to tan-yellow, notes the Lagorio Family of Companies.Tomatoes may also be classed depending on the stage of maturity at harvest, which ranges from immature green through fully ripened. .

Vine-Ripened Tomatoes... yet another lie by modern Ag

Once again, I am dismayed by the lies told and sold to us by the modern agriculture industry.This means the tomato has crossed a specific threshold where it will continue to mature, and redden, even after it is picked.If the tomato is picked before it is “mature green”, then it will eventually rot without turning soft and red.The reason tomatoes are picked when green is that they are much easier to handle – they don’t bruise or break.Now, if you have bought tomatoes from a conventional grocery store anytime in the last few years, you have a decision to make.The problem is that what the average consumer believes is meant by “allowed to ripen on the vine” is entirely different than what most commercial producers mean.Then they are carefully picked and delivered to a local grocer at, or almost at, prime eating ripeness.Granted, there may be some places and some growers who do indeed harvest their tomatoes at more mature stages, but they are not required to do so.to make an untrue statement with intent to deceive to create a false or misleading impression.Now, to add insult to injury, let me share the results of research done by the University of Florida (published in the Nov 1998 Journal of the American Society for Horticultual Science).The study states that there were no perceived differences in taste, texture, or visual appeal between “mature greens” and “vine-ripened” tomatoes.This means that for over 15 years, we have PROOF that there is no perceived difference between these two types of tomatoes, yet they still charge more! .

Why Tomatoes Split and Ways to Prevent It

While tomatoes can split at any stage—green or ripe—it seems most frustrating when you're ready to harvest that delicious fruit for a tasty meal.Cracking can occur at any stage—green or ripe—but it seems most frustrating when you're ready to harvest a rich, ripe tomato for a meal.When you water, target the base of the plant and avoid splashing soil on the leaves to prevent the spread of soil-borne diseases like blight and septoria leaf spot.When you water, target the base of the plant and avoid splashing soil on the leaves to prevent the spread of soil-borne diseases like blight and septoria leaf spot.Provide your plants with a two- to three-inch layer of organic mulch, such as straw, pine needles, or shredded bark.Mulch helps maintain consistent soil moisture levels, and you'll deal with less splitting.Provide your plants with a two- to three-inch layer of organic mulch, such as straw, pine needles, or shredded bark.Mulch helps maintain consistent soil moisture levels, and you'll deal with less splitting.Many hybrid varieties offer not only disease resistance and high productivity, but they also are less prone to split.Many hybrid varieties offer not only disease resistance and high productivity, but they also are less prone to split.Because nutrients leech out of containers as the water drains, make sure to feed them with an organic fertilizer according to the directions on the label.Inspect them carefully for any signs of insects or rot, and toss any fruit that smells sours or oozes. .

On The Vine Red Tomatoes Information and Facts

As they are allowed to ripen to a later stage of maturity, they have a higher sugar content, are uniformly bright red, and medium-sized.Red on the vine tomatoes are available year-round.The attached to these tomatoes contains nutrients and continues to feed the fruits while they are ripening in cases or on the shelf.Other varieties are picked green and ripened with a poly ethylene gas which reduces the natural sugar content and sometimes results in a more mealy texture.Red on the vine tomatoes are ideal for display and uniform slices.Oneis easiest, three is harder.the other 24...People have shared On The Vine Red Tomatoes using the Specialty Produce app for iPhone and Android.Pinpoint your location annonymously through the Specialty Produce App and let others know about unique flavors that are around them. .

Why Do Tomatoes Split On The Vine?

You’ve raised your tomato plants right: provided them with good-quality potting mix, fertilized them with care, faithfully pinched off sucker shoots, or trimmed back low-hanging branches.So why do tomatoes split, even when we’ve spent so much time and effort on making sure everything goes perfectly?In the other, lengthwise splits happen down the sides of the fruit, either along the indents in heirlooms or along the surface of smooth varieties.Let’s explore this in detail and go over what causes it, how to stop it from happening, and whether your split tomatoes are safe to eat.As tomatoes get close to ripeness, their skin doesn’t grow as quickly.Many heirloom varieties, especially the big beefsteak types, will crack in concentric circles around the top of the fruit as they grow and mature on the vine.Think of them as “tomato stretch marks”, as the plant’s trying to make the fruit nice and juicy for you.Since these soils tend to drain off excess, an occasional downpour won’t be a problem, as the water will flow easily away.Work the soil at least a foot down or more and incorporate lots of compost and other organic material to loosen it up.Instead, work the whole bed so that excess moisture can spread out over a larger surface and be absorbed.That small dose should be enough to cover the entire lifespan of that plant, so you won’t need to apply any more calcium after that.There are a number of crack-resistant tomatoes available for purchase, both as seed or in live plant form.Even then, varieties that aren’t crack-resistant are still fine to plant as long as you watch closely.You don’t want to give your tomatoes feast or famine conditions, because letting the soil dry out totally between waterings can lead to other problems like blossom end rot.If you’re watching your growing tomatoes closely, you’ll be able to see ones that have started to produce radial cracks. .

Tomatoes 101: Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits

Tomatoes are the major dietary source of the antioxidant lycopene, which has been linked to many health benefits, including reduced risk of heart disease and cancer.An essential mineral, potassium is beneficial for blood pressure control and heart disease prevention ( 3 ).An essential mineral, potassium is beneficial for blood pressure control and heart disease prevention ( ).An antioxidant that often gives foods a yellow or orange hue, beta carotene is converted into vitamin A in your body.An antioxidant that often gives foods a yellow or orange hue, beta carotene is converted into vitamin A in your body.Found in tomato skin, this flavonoid has been shown to decrease inflammation and protect against various diseases in mice ( 12 ).Found in tomato skin, this flavonoid has been shown to decrease inflammation and protect against various diseases in mice ( ).A powerful antioxidant compound, chlorogenic acid may lower blood pressure in people with elevated levels ( 13 , 14 ).Thus, it may be easier to bump up your lycopene intake by eating unprocessed tomatoes — which also have far less sugar than ketchup.It’s found in the highest concentrations in tomato products, such as ketchup, juice, paste, and sauce.A study in middle-aged men linked low blood levels of lycopene and beta-carotene to increased risk of heart attacks and strokes ( 27 , 28 ).Increasing evidence from clinical trials suggests that supplementing with lycopene may help lower LDL (bad) cholesterol ( 29 ).Clinical studies of tomato products indicate benefits against inflammation and markers of oxidative stress ( 30 , 31 ).While the high lycopene content is believed responsible, high-quality human research needed to confirm the cause of these benefits ( 36 , 37 , 38 ).According to one study, people who ingested 1.3 ounces (40 grams) of tomato paste — providing 16 mg of lycopene — with olive oil every day for 10 weeks experienced 40% fewer sunburns ( 43 ).To make them red before selling, food companies spray them with artificial ethylene gas.If you buy unripened tomatoes, you can speed up the ripening process by wrapping them in a sheet of newspaper and keeping them on the kitchen counter for a few days.SUMMARY Tomatoes are often harvested while still green and immature, then ripened artificially with ethylene gas. .

Roasted Vine Tomatoes Recipe

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Cut the cores from the tomatoes, removing as little as possible. .

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